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Employer and Employee Responsibilities - Employment Tax Enforcement

Both employer and employee hold the responsibility for collecting and remitting withholding taxes to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). For the most part, the employer withholds these taxes on behalf of their employees, but in cases where an employer does not do this, or where an employee is self-employed, it is the responsibility of the employee to pay these withholding taxes.

Employer's Responsibility

Employers must report income and employment taxes withheld from their employees on an Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return (Form 941) and deposit these taxes in full to an authorized bank or financial institution pursuant to Federal Tax Deposit Requirements. Employers are also responsible for filing a FUTA return annually, and depositing those taxes.

Employers who do not comply with the employment tax laws may be subject to criminal and civil sanctions for willfully failing to pay employment taxes.

Employees’ Responsibility

Employees who do not have taxes withheld nor remit them personally, are still liable for these taxes and may not qualify for Social Security, Medicare, or unemployment benefits.

Employees who are concerned that their employer is improperly withholding or failing to withhold federal income and employment taxes should report their employer by contacting the IRS at 1-800-829-1040. In cases where the employer withheld employment taxes but failed to deposit them, or failed to issue W-2s, the employee should contact the employer to request the W-2.  If the employee is unable to secure a W-2 from the employer, the employee should complete and attach Form 4852, Substitute for W-2, to their tax return using the best information available to calculate the wages and the withholding. This information can often be secured from pay stubs. 

In addition, if the employer refuses to withhold employment taxes from these wages and the IRS is unable to collect the employment taxes from the employer, the employee still has the responsibility to pay income tax and is ultimately responsible for his/her share of the FICA tax.

Evasion of Employment Taxes Carries a Price

Evading employment taxes can have serious consequences for employers and the employees. Employers may be subject to criminal and civil sanctions for willfully failing to pay employment taxes. Employees suffer because they may not qualify for social security, Medicare, or unemployment benefits when employers do not report or pay employment and unemployment taxes. Consequently, taxes withheld and paid by compliant employers are used to pay the refunds and social security benefits of employees whose employers did not pay the withheld taxes.


Table of Contents - Employment Tax Enforcement

 Criminal Investigation (CI)

 

Page Last Reviewed or Updated: 12-Feb-2014