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SOI Tax Stats - Split-Interest Trust Study Metadata

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Split-interest trusts make distributions to both charitable and noncharitable beneficiaries, while providing tax benefits to their donor. All split-interest trusts must annually file Form 5227, Split-Interest Trust Information Return, to report financial activity and determine if they should be treated as a private foundation. Based on the method and timing of distributions, split-interest trusts are divided into the following four categories:

  • Charitable remainder annuity trusts—distribute income in a series of fixed payments to one or more noncharitable beneficiaries for a defined period of time, after which the remaining value of the trust is transferred to a charitable beneficiary.
  • Charitable remainder unitrusts—distribute a percentage of the fair market value to one or more noncharitable beneficiaries for a defined period of time, after which remaining value of the trust is transferred to a charitable beneficiary.
  • Charitable lead trusts—distribute a sequence of payments to a charitable beneficiary for a period of time, after which the remaining trust assets are transferred to a noncharitable beneficiary.
  • Pooled income funds—allow donors to donate assets to a charity. The pooled assets are invested as a group and each donor receives income based on the ratio of his or her contribution to the total value of the investment pool. After the death of the donor, his or her prorated share of the investment pool is withdrawn and given to the charitable organization.

This page provides additional information about data produced in SOI's Split-Interest Trust Study. Please click on a link below to get started.

Selected Terms and Concepts Current and Prior Revisions of Form 5227 Data Sources and Limitations

Please visit Split-Interest Trust Statistics for data tables and articles from the study.

Page Last Reviewed or Updated: 22-Jan-2013