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W-2s, W-3s, 1099-MISC, Information Returns Due Date: January 31 (ASL) YouTube Video Text Script

Hi, I’m Maria, and I work for the IRS. 

If you are an employer, here’s an important reminder about a law change that most likely affects you.

As an employer, the law now requires you to file the copy of the W-2 forms you give to your employees by January 31st.  

This includes the W-3 forms. 

As in the past, you still need to send these forms to the Social Security Administration.

Now you just need to do that a little sooner.

That’s also the deadline if you have independent contractors working for you. 

In other words, if you’re filing a Form 1099 Miscellaneous and you use box 7, non-employee compensation, you need to send in your copy of that form by January 31st. 

This deadline helps us prevent fraud because we can check taxpayers’ returns with your records sooner.

Here are some tips to help you file these forms on time and avoid penalties.

Before the end of the year, make sure your employees’ information is correct.

This includes names, addresses and ID numbers.

Also, double check your company’s information with the Social Security Administration and with any agency whose information you rely on to complete W-2s.

If you need paper forms, order them early.

If a payroll service files your forms, make sure they have what they need to file your forms on time.

Remember, extensions for filing W-2s are no longer automatic.

They will only be allowed for very specific reasons, such as disaster-related damage to your records. 

You can get details about extensions on Form 8809.

Find it and other forms at irs.gov/forms.