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Publication 535 - Introductory Material


Introduction

This publication discusses common business expenses and explains what is and is not deductible. The general rules for deducting business expenses are discussed in the opening chapter. The chapters that follow cover specific expenses and list other publications and forms you may need.

Note. Section references within this publication are to the Internal Revenue Code and regulation references are to the Income Tax Regulations under the Code.

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Future Developments

For the latest information about developments related to Pub. 535, such as legislation enacted after it was published, go to 
IRS.gov/pub535.

What's New for 2016

The following items highlight some changes in the tax law for 2016.

Advance payments of the Health Coverage Tax Credit (HCTC). Beginning in 2016, an individual who qualifies for the HCTC can enroll in a program in which the IRS makes monthly advance payments of the HCTC directly to health plan administrators for qualified health insurance coverage. For more information, see chapter 6.

Payroll tax credit election for research expenditures for qualified small businesses. . Qualified small businesses may elect to apply a certain amount of the research tax credit against the employer portion of social security taxes. For more information, see chapter 7.

Standard mileage rate. Beginning in 2016, the standard mileage rate for the cost of operating your car, van, pickup, or panel truck for each mile of business use is 54 cents per mile. For more information, see chapter 11.

What's New for 2017

The following item highlights a change in the tax law for 2017.

Standard mileage rate. Beginning in 2017, the standard mileage rate for the cost of operating your car, van, pickup, or panel truck for each mile of business use is 53.5 cents per mile.

Reminders

The following reminders and other items may help you file your tax return.

IRS e-file (Electronic Filing)

e-file

You can file your tax returns electronically using an IRS e-file option. The benefits of IRS e-file include faster refunds, increased accuracy, and acknowledgment of IRS receipt of your return. You can use one of the following IRS e-file options.

  • Use an authorized IRS e-file provider.

  • Use a personal computer.

  • Visit a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) site.

For details on these fast filing methods, see your income tax package.

Form 1099-MISC. File Form 1099-MISC, Miscellaneous Income, for each person to whom you have paid during the year in the course of your trade or business at least $600 in rents, services (including parts and materials), prizes and awards, other income payments, medical and health care payments, and crop insurance proceeds. See the Instructions for Form 1099-MISC for more information and additional reporting requirements.

Photographs of missing children. The Internal Revenue Service is a proud partner with the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children® (NCMEC). Photographs of missing children selected by the Center may appear in this publication on pages that would otherwise be blank. You can help bring these children home by looking at the photographs and calling 1-800-THE-LOST (1-800-843-5678) (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) if you recognize a child.

Preventing slavery and human trafficking. Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery, and involves the use of force, fraud, or coercion to exploit human beings for some type of labor or commercial sex purpose. The United States is a source, transit, and destination country for men, women, and children, both U.S. citizens and foreign nationals, who are subjected to the injustices of slavery and human trafficking, including forced labor, debt bondage, involuntary servitude, “mail-order” marriages, and sex trafficking. Trafficking in persons can occur in both lawful and illicit industries or markets, including in hotel services, hospitality, agriculture, manufacturing, janitorial services, construction, health and elder care, domestic service, brothels, massage parlors, and street prostitution, among others. The President’s Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (PITF) brings together federal departments and agencies to ensure a whole-of-government approach that addresses all aspects of human trafficking. Online resources for recognizing and reporting trafficking activities, and assisting victims include the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Blue Campaign at DHS.gov/blue-campaign, the Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons at State.gov/j/tip, and the National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC) at humantraffickinghotline.org. DHS is responsible for investigating human trafficking, arresting traffickers, and protecting victims. DHS also provides immigration relief to non-U.S. citizen victims of human trafficking. DHS uses a victim-centered approach to combating human trafficking, which places equal value on identifying and stabilizing victims and on investigating and prosecuting traffickers. Victims are crucial to investigations and prosecutions; each case and every conviction changes lives. DHS understands how difficult it can be for victims to come forward and work with law enforcement due to their trauma. DHS is committed to helping victims feel stable, safe, and secure. To report suspected human trafficking, call the DHS domestic 24-hour toll-free number at 1-866-DHS-2-ICE (1-866-347-2423) or 1-802-872-6199 (non-toll-free international). For help from the NHTRC, call the National Human Trafficking Hotline toll free at 1-888-373-7888 or text HELP or INFO to BeFree (233733).


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