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Foreign Intermediaries

An intermediary is a custodian, broker, nominee, or any other person that acts as an agent for another person. A foreign intermediary is either a qualified intermediary or a nonqualified intermediary. Generally, you determine whether an entity is a qualified intermediary or a nonqualified intermediary based on the representations the intermediary makes on Form W-8IMY.

Generally, the payees of payments made to a foreign intermediary are the persons for whom the foreign intermediary collects the payment, such as account holders or customers, not the intermediary itself. This rule applies for purposes of NRA withholding and for Form 1099 reporting and backup withholding.

You must determine whether the customers or account holders of a foreign intermediary are U.S. or foreign persons, and, if the account holder or customer is foreign, whether a reduced rate of NRA withholding applies. You make these determinations based on the foreign intermediary's Form W-8IMY and associated information and documentation. If you do not have all of the information or documentation that is required to reliably associate a payment with a payee, you must apply the presumption rules. Refer to Documentation and Presumption Rules.

You may, however, treat a qualified intermediary that has assumed primary withholding responsibility for a payment as the payee, and you are not required to withhold.

Nonqualified Intermediary

A nonqualified intermediary (NQI) is any intermediary that is a foreign person and that is not a qualified intermediary. The payees of a payment made to an NQI are the customers or account holders on whose behalf the NQI is acting.

U.S. Branches of Foreign Banks and Foreign Insurance Companies

Special rules apply to a U.S. branch of a foreign bank subject to Federal Reserve Board supervision or a foreign insurance company subject to state regulatory supervision. If you agree to treat the branch as a U.S. person, you may treat the branch as a U.S. payee for a payment subject to NRA withholding provided you receive a Form W-8IMY from the U.S. branch on which the agreement is evidenced. If you treat the branch as a U.S. payee, you are not required to withhold. Even though you agree to treat the branch as a U.S. person, you must report the payment on Form 1042-S, Annual Withholding Tax Return for U.S. Source Income of Foreign Persons.

A financial institution organized in a U.S. possession is treated as a U.S. branch. The special rules that apply to U.S. branches apply to a possessions financial institution. (Notice 2000-11, as updated by Notice 2002-3)

If you are paying a U.S. branch an amount that is not subject to NRA withholding, treat the payment as made to a foreign person, irrespective of any agreement to treat the branch as a U.S. person for amounts subject to NRA withholding. Consequently, amounts not subject to NRA withholding that are paid to a U.S. branch are not subject to Form 1099 reporting or to backup withholding.

If the U.S. branch does not provide you with a Form W-8IMY, then you should treat a payment subject to NRA withholding as made to the foreign person of which the branch is a part and the income as effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business in the United States.

Alternatively, a U.S. branch may provide you with a Form W-8IMY with which it associates the documentation of the persons on whose behalf it acts. In this situation, the payees are the persons on whose behalf the branch acts provided you can reliably associate the payment with valid documentation from those persons.

References/Related Topics

 

Page Last Reviewed or Updated: 05-Nov-2014