General Instructions

Election To Claim the Foreign Tax Credit Without Filing Form 1116

You may be able to claim the foreign tax credit without filing Form 1116. By making this election, the foreign tax credit limitation (lines 15 through 21 of the form) will not apply to you. This election is available only if you meet all of the following conditions.

Tax Help

For more information about, or assistance with, figuring the foreign tax credit, the following IRS resources are available.
IRS Contacts Call 1-800-829-1040 (in U.S. and Puerto Rico).
  Call 267-941-1000 (overseas) (not toll free).
  Contact IRS offices at U.S. Embassies in Beijing, London, Paris, or the U.S. consulate in Frankfurt.
  Write to Internal Revenue Service, International Section, Philadelphia, PA 19255-0725.
Publications Pub. 54, Tax Guide for U.S. Citizens and Resident Aliens Abroad.
  Pub. 514, Foreign Tax Credit for Individuals.
  Pub. 519, U.S. Tax Guide for Aliens.
  Pub. 570, Tax Guide for Individuals With Income From U.S. Possessions.
  Pub. 575, Pension and Annuity Income.

  • All of your foreign source gross income was “passive category income” (which includes most interest and dividends). See Passive Category Income later. However, for this purpose, passive income also includes (a) income subject to the special rule for high-taxed income described later, and (b) certain export financing interest.

  • All the income and any foreign taxes paid on it were reported to you on a qualified payee statement. Qualified payee statements include Form 1099-DIV, Form 1099-INT, Schedule K-1 (Form 1041), Schedule K-1 (Form 1065), Schedule K-1 (Form 1065-B), Schedule K-1 (Form 1120S), or similar substitute statements.

  • Your total creditable foreign taxes are not more than $300 ($600 if married filing a joint return).

This election is not available to estates or trusts.

If you make this election:

  • You cannot carry over to or from any other year any foreign taxes paid or accrued in a tax year to which the election applies (but carryovers to and from other years are unaffected). See the instructions for line 10 later.

  • You are still required to take into account the general rules for determining whether a tax is creditable. See Foreign Taxes Eligible for a Credit and Foreign Taxes Not Eligible for a Credit later.

  • You are still required to reduce the taxes available for credit by any amount you would have entered on line 12 of Form 1116. See the instructions for line 12 later.

To make the election, just enter on the foreign tax credit line of your tax return (for example, Form 1040, line 47) the smaller of (a) your total foreign tax or (b) your regular tax (for example, Form 1040, line 44).

Purpose of Form

Who should file.   File Form 1116 to claim the foreign tax credit if the election above does not apply and:
  • You are an individual, estate, or trust, and

  • You paid or accrued certain foreign taxes to a foreign country or U.S. possession.

  See Foreign Taxes Eligible for a Credit later to determine if the taxes you paid or accrued qualify for the credit.

Do not use Form 1116 to figure a credit for taxes paid to the U.S. Virgin Islands. Instead, use Form 8689, Allocation of Individual Income Tax to the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Nonresident aliens.   If you are a nonresident alien, you generally cannot take the credit. However, you may be able to take the credit if:
  • You were a resident of Puerto Rico during your entire tax year, or

  • You pay or accrue tax to a foreign country or U.S. possession on income from foreign sources that is effectively connected with a trade or business in the United States. But if you must pay tax to a foreign country or U.S. possession on income from U.S. sources only because you are a citizen or a resident of that country or U.S. possession, do not use that tax in figuring the amount of your credit.

  See section 906 for more information on the foreign tax credit allowed to a nonresident alien individual.

Credit or Deduction

Instead of claiming a credit for eligible foreign taxes, you can choose to deduct foreign income taxes. Form 1040 filers choosing to do so would deduct foreign income taxes on Schedule A (Form 1040), Itemized Deductions. Generally, if you take the credit for any eligible foreign taxes, you cannot take any part of that year's foreign taxes as a deduction. However, even if you take the credit for eligible foreign taxes for the year, you can take a deduction for:

  • Foreign taxes not allowed as a credit because of boycott provisions.

  • Taxes paid to certain foreign countries for which a credit has been denied, as described in item (2) under Foreign Taxes Not Eligible for a Credit later.

  • Taxes on income or gain that are not creditable because you do not meet the holding period requirement, as described in item (3) or (5) under Foreign Taxes Not Eligible for a Credit later.

  • Taxes on income or gain that are not creditable because you have to make related payments, as described in item (4) or (6) under Foreign Taxes Not Eligible for a Credit later.

  • Certain taxes paid or accrued to a foreign country in connection with the purchase or sale of oil or gas extracted in that country, as described in item (8) under Foreign Taxes Not Eligible for a Credit later.

  • Taxes on income or gain that are not creditable because they were paid or accrued in connection with a covered asset acquisition, as described in item (10) under Foreign Taxes Not Eligible for a Credit later.

If you want to change your election to take a deduction instead of a credit, or a credit instead of a deduction, you must do so within a special 10-year limitation period. See Pub. 514 for more information.

Foreign Taxes Eligible for a Credit

You can take a credit for income, war profits, and excess profits taxes paid or accrued during your tax year to any foreign country or U.S. possession, or any political subdivision (for example, city, state, or province), agency, or instrumentality of the country or possession. This includes taxes paid or accrued in lieu of a foreign or possession income, war profits, or excess profits tax that is otherwise generally imposed. For purposes of the credit, U.S. possessions include Puerto Rico and American Samoa.

U.S. citizens living in certain treaty countries may be able to take an additional foreign tax credit for foreign tax imposed on certain items of income from the United States. See Tax Treaties in Pub. 514 for details.

Foreign Taxes Not Eligible for a Credit

You cannot take a credit for the following foreign taxes.

  1. Taxes paid to a foreign country that you do not legally owe, including amounts eligible for refund by the foreign country. If you do not exercise your available remedies to reduce the amount of foreign tax to what you legally owe, a credit for the excess amount is not allowed.

    Example.

    Country X withholds $25 of tax from a payment made to you. Under the income tax treaty between the United States and Country X, you owe only $15 and can claim a refund from Country X for the other $10. Only $15 is eligible for the foreign tax credit (whether or not you apply for a refund).

  2. Taxes imposed by and paid to certain foreign countries. These countries are those designated by the Secretary of State as countries that repeatedly provide support for acts of international terrorism, countries with which the United States does not have or does not conduct diplomatic relations, or countries whose governments are not recognized by the United States and are not otherwise eligible to purchase defense articles or services under the Arms Export Control Act. Pub. 514 contains a list of these countries.

  3. Foreign taxes withheld on a dividend from a corporation, if you have not held the stock for at least 16 days within the 31-day period that begins 15 days before the ex-dividend date. This required holding period is greater for preferred-stock dividends attributable to periods totaling more than 366 days. See section 901(k)(3) or Pub. 514.

  4. Foreign taxes withheld on a dividend to the extent that you have to make related payments on positions in substantially similar or related property.

    Example.

    You receive a dividend subject to foreign withholding tax. You are obligated to pay someone else an amount equal to all these dividends you receive. You cannot claim a foreign tax credit for the withholding tax on these dividends.

  5. Foreign taxes withheld on income or gain (other than dividends) from property if you have not held the property for at least 16 days within the 31-day period that begins 15 days before the date on which the right to receive the payment arises. See section 901(l) or Pub. 514.

  6. Foreign taxes withheld on income or gain (other than dividends) from property to the extent you have to make related payments on positions in substantially similar or related property.

  7. Payments of foreign tax that are returned to you in the form of a subsidy.

  8. Taxes paid or accrued to a foreign country in connection with the purchase or sale of oil or gas extracted in that country if you do not have an economic interest in the oil or gas, and the purchase price or sales price is different from the fair market value of the oil or gas at the time of the purchase or sale.

  9. Foreign taxes paid or accrued on income for which you are claiming an exclusion on Form 8873, Extraterritorial Income Exclusion. However, see section 943(d) for an exception for certain withholding taxes.

  10. The disqualified portion of any foreign tax paid or accrued in connection with a covered asset acquisition. Covered asset acquisitions include certain acquisitions that result in a stepped-up basis for U.S. tax purposes. For more information, see section 901(m). The IRS intends to issue guidance that will explain this provision in greater detail.

You cannot take a credit for any interest or penalties you must pay.

Foreign Currency Conversion

Report all amounts in U.S. dollars except where specified otherwise in Part II. If you have to convert from foreign currency, attach a detailed explanation of how you figured the conversion rate.

If you take a credit for taxes paid, the conversion rate is the rate of exchange in effect on the day you paid the foreign taxes (or on the day the tax was withheld). If you receive a refund of foreign taxes paid, the conversion rate is the rate in effect when you paid the taxes, not when you receive the refund.

If you choose to account for foreign income taxes on an accrual basis, you must generally use the average exchange rate for the tax year to which the taxes relate. However, you cannot do so if any of the following apply.

  1. The foreign taxes are actually paid more than 2 years after the close of the tax year to which they relate.

  2. The foreign taxes are actually paid in a tax year prior to the year to which they relate.

  3. The foreign tax liability is denominated in any inflationary currency.

    Accrued foreign taxes not eligible for conversion at the yearly average exchange rate must be converted using the exchange rate on the date of payment of the tax. However, accrued but unpaid foreign taxes denominated in inflationary currency must be translated into U.S. dollars using the exchange rate on the last day of the U.S. tax year to which those taxes relate.

Inflationary currency.   Inflationary currency means the currency of a country in which there is cumulative inflation during the 36 calendar months immediately preceding the last day of the tax year of at least 30%, as determined by reference to the consumer price index of the country listed in the monthly issues of International Financial Statistics, or a successor publication, of the International Monetary Fund.

Election to use exchange rate on date paid.   If you have accrued foreign taxes that you are otherwise required to convert using the average exchange rate, you can elect to use the exchange rate in effect on the date the foreign taxes are paid if the taxes are denominated in a nonfunctional foreign currency. If any of the accrued taxes are unpaid, you must translate them into U.S. dollars using the exchange rate on the last day of the U.S. tax year to which those taxes relate. Once made, the election applies to the tax year for which made and all subsequent tax years unless revoked with the consent of the IRS. It must be made by the due date (including extensions) for filing the tax return for the first tax year to which the election applies. Make the election by attaching a statement to the applicable tax return.

Special rules for a qualified business unit.    If you have a qualified business unit, see Pub. 514 for special rules for converting foreign income and taxes into U.S. dollars. You may have a qualified business unit if you own and operate a business or are self-employed in a foreign country.

Foreign Tax Credit Redeterminations

If you claim a credit for foreign taxes paid, and you receive a refund of all or part of those taxes in a later year, you must file an amended return reducing the taxes credited by the amount refunded.

If you claim the foreign tax credit based on foreign taxes accrued instead of foreign taxes paid, your credit must be redetermined in any of the following situations.

  1. Your accrued taxes when paid differ from the amount you claimed as a credit.

  2. You do not pay the accrued taxes within 2 years after the close of the tax year to which they relate.

    If this applies to you, you must reduce the credit previously claimed by the amount of the unpaid taxes. You will not be allowed a credit for the unpaid taxes until you pay them. When you pay the accrued taxes, a new tax redetermination occurs and you must translate the taxes into U.S. dollars using the exchange rate as of the date they were paid. The foreign tax credit is allowed for the year to which the foreign tax relates. See Foreign Currency Conversion earlier.

  3. After you pay the accrued taxes, you receive a full or partial refund of them.

  4. For taxes taken into account when accrued but translated into dollars on the date of payment, the dollar value of the accrued tax differs from the dollar value of the tax paid because of fluctuations in the exchange rate between the date of accrual and the date of payment. However, no redetermination is required if the change in foreign tax liability for each foreign country is solely attributable to exchange rate fluctuation and is less than the smaller of:

    1. $10,000, or

    2. 2% of the total dollar amount of the foreign tax initially accrued for that foreign country for the U.S. tax year.

In this case, you must adjust your U.S. tax in the tax year in which the accrued foreign taxes are paid.

If any of the above situations occurs after you file your return, you generally must file Form 1040X, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, or other amended return, to notify the IRS so that your U.S. tax for the year or years affected can be redetermined. Complete and attach to Form 1040X (or other amended return) a revised Form 1116 for the tax year(s) affected and a statement that contains information sufficient for the IRS to redetermine your U.S. tax liability. In some cases, you may not have to file Form 1040X or attach Form 1116. See Pub. 514 for more information, including exceptions.

If you do not notify the IRS of a foreign tax refund or change in the dollar amount of foreign taxes paid or accrued, you will have to pay a penalty unless you can show that the failure to notify the IRS is due to reasonable cause and not due to willful neglect.

Income From Sources Outside theUnited States

Foreign source income generally includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Compensation for services performed outside the United States.

  • Interest income from a payer located outside the United States.

  • Dividends from a corporation incorporated outside the United States.

  • Gain on the sale of nondepreciable personal property you sold while maintaining a tax home outside the United States, if you paid a tax of at least 10% of the gain to a foreign country.

Foreign source income generally does not include gain realized on the sale or exchange of personal property by a U.S. resident as defined in section 865(g).

Special rules apply in determining the source of income from the sale of inventory; sale of depreciable property used in a trade or business; sale of intangible property such as a patent, copyright, or trademark; and transportation services that begin or end in the United States or a U.S. possession. See Pub. 514 for more information.

Compensation for labor or personal services as an employee.   If you are an employee and receive compensation for labor or personal services performed both inside and outside the United States, special rules apply in determining the source of the compensation. Compensation (other than fringe benefits) is sourced on a time basis. Fringe benefits (such as housing and education) are sourced on a geographical basis. Or you may be able to use an alternative basis to determine the source. If you use an alternative basis, you may have to check the box on line 1b (discussed later). See Pub. 514 for more information.

Categories of Income

Use a separate Form 1116 to figure the credit for each category of foreign source income listed above Part I of Form 1116. The following instructions tell you what kind of income to include in each category. For more information, see Pub. 514, Code section 904, and Regulations sections 1.904-4 and 1.904-5.

a. Passive Category Income

Passive category income consists of passive income and specified passive category income.

Passive category income does not include gain from the sale of inventory or property held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of your trade or business; gain from commodities hedging transactions; and active business gains or losses of producers, processors, merchants, or handlers of commodities. It may also not include dividends, interest, rents, or royalties received from a controlled foreign corporation (CFC) in which you are a U.S. shareholder who owns 10% or more of the total voting power of all classes of the corporation's stock.

Passive income.   Passive income generally includes dividends, interest, royalties, rents, annuities, excess of gains over losses from the sale of property that produces such income or of non-income-producing investment property, and excess of gains over losses from foreign currency or commodities transactions. Capital gains not related to the active conduct of a trade or business are also generally passive income.

  Passive income does not include export financing interest, active business rents and royalties, or high-taxed income (see High-taxed income later).

Specified passive category income.   Dividends from a DISC (domestic international sales corporation) or former DISC to the extent they are treated as foreign source income, and certain distributions from a former FSC (foreign sales corporation) are specified passive category income.

b. General Category Income

General category income is income that is not passive category income or income described in categories c, d, and e, discussed later. General category income may include:

  • Wages, salary, and overseas allowances of an individual as an employee.

  • Income earned in the active conduct of a trade or business.

  • Gains from the sale of inventory or depreciable property used in a trade or business.

Financial services income.   In general, financial services income is treated as general category income if it is derived by a financial services entity. You are a financial services entity if you are predominantly engaged in the active conduct of a banking, insurance, financing, or similar business for any taxable year. Financial services income of a financial services entity generally includes income derived in the active conduct of a banking, financing, insurance or similar business. Financial services income of a financial services entity also includes passive income and certain incidental income.

  If you qualify as a financial services entity because you treat certain items of income as active financing income under Regulations section 1.904-4(e)(2)(i)(Y), you must show the type and amount of each item on an attachment to Form 1116.

High-taxed income.   In some cases, passive income and taxes must be treated as general category income and taxes. Generally, passive income and taxes must be treated as general category income if the foreign taxes you paid on the income (after allocation of expenses) exceed the highest U.S. tax that can be imposed on the income. However, passive income that is financial services income is treated as general category income regardless of whether it is high-taxed income. See Pub. 514 and Regulations section 1.904-4(c) for more information.

c. Section 901(j) Income

No credit is allowed for foreign taxes imposed by and paid or accrued to certain sanctioned countries. However, income derived from each such country is subject to a separate foreign tax credit limitation. Therefore, you must use a separate Form 1116 for income derived from each such country. Because no credit is allowed for taxes paid to sanctioned countries, you would generally complete Form 1116 for this category only through line 17.

These countries are those designated by the Secretary of State as countries that repeatedly provide support for acts of international terrorism, countries with which the United States does not have or does not conduct diplomatic relations, or countries whose governments are not recognized by the United States and are not otherwise eligible to purchase defense articles or services under the Arms Export Control Act. Pub. 514 contains a list of these countries.

If you paid taxes to a country that ceased to be a sanctioned country during the tax year, see Pub. 514 for details on how to figure the foreign tax credit for the period that begins after the end of the sanctions.

Presidential waiver.   The President of the United States has the authority to waive the denial of the credit with respect to a sanctioned country if (a) it is in the national interest of the United States and will expand trade and investment opportunities for U.S. companies in such sanctioned country, and (b) the President reports to the Congress, not less than 30 days before the waiver is granted, the intention to grant such a waiver and the reason for such waiver.

d. Certain Income Re-Sourced by Treaty

If a sourcing rule in an applicable income tax treaty treats U.S. source income as foreign source, and you elect to apply the treaty, the income will be treated as foreign source.

Important.

You must compute a separate foreign tax credit limitation for any such income for which you claim benefits under a treaty, using a separate Form 1116 for each amount of re-sourced income from a treaty country. See sections 865(h), 904(d)(6), and 904(h)(10) and the regulations under those sections (including 1.904-5(m)(7)) for any grouping rules and exceptions. Add the amounts from line 22 of each separate Form 1116 and enter the total on line 25 of your summary Form 1116 (that is, the Form 1116 for which you are completing Part IV). In addition, you may be required to file Form 8833, Treaty-Based Return Position Disclosure Under Section 6114 or 7701(b), for the re-sourced income.

e. Lump-Sum Distributions

You can take a foreign tax credit for taxes you paid or accrued on a foreign source lump-sum distribution from a pension plan. Special formulas may be used to figure a separate tax on a qualified lump-sum distribution for the year in which the distribution is received. See Pub. 575 for more information.

If you are able to elect, and do elect, to figure your U.S. tax on a lump-sum distribution using Form 4972, Tax on Lump-Sum Distributions, a separate foreign tax credit limitation applies. Use a separate Form 1116. On this separate Form 1116, check box e above Part I. Skip Part I. Complete Part II showing only foreign taxes that are attributable to the lump-sum distribution. Then, complete the Worksheet for Lump-Sum Distributions above to figure the amounts to enter in Part III.

Worksheet for Lump-Sum Distributions

1. Enter the amount from Form 1116, line 8 1.  
2. Enter the sum of the amounts from Form 4972, lines 6 and 12, that are from foreign sources. Also enter this amount  
on Form 1116, line 17
2.  
3. Enter the sum of the amounts from Form 4972, lines 6 and 12, that are from all sources (both U.S. and foreign). Also enter  
this amount on Form 1116, line 18
3.  
4. Divide line 2 by line 3. Enter the result as a decimal (rounded  
to at least four places) here and on Form 1116, line 19. If  
line 2 is equal to or more than line 3, enter “1
4.  
5. Enter the amount from Form 4972, line 30. Also include  
this amount on Form 1116, line 20
5.  
  Caution: Do not include the amount on line 5 above in the  
tax you enter on line 20 of any other Form 1116 you  
are filing.
   
6. Multiply line 5 by line 4. Enter the result here and on  
Form 1116, line 21
6.  
7. Enter the smaller of line 1 or line 6 here and on Form 1116,  
line 22. To the left of line 22, write “LSD
7.  

Special Rules

Look-Through Rules

Certain income received or accrued by you as a 10%-or-more U.S. shareholder in a controlled foreign corporation (CFC) is treated as income in one of the separate categories listed under Categories of Income earlier. For example, Subpart F inclusions, dividends, interest, rents, and royalties from a CFC are treated as separate category income to the extent they are attributable to separate category income of the CFC. See Regulations section 1.904-5 for more information.

Reporting Foreign Tax Information From Partnerships and S Corporations

If you received a 2013 Schedule K-1 from a partnership or S corporation that includes foreign tax information, use the rules below to report that information on Form 1116.

General Information for Partners and S Corporation Shareholders

Less-than-10% limited partners and certain less-than-10% S corporation shareholders.   If you are a limited partner or an S corporation shareholder who does not actively participate in the management of the S corporation and you own a less-than-10% interest (by value) in the partnership or S corporation, you generally may categorize your distributive share of foreign source income and deductions from that partnership or S corporation as passive income. See Regulations section 1.904-5(h)(2) for more details and exceptions.

  
This rule takes precedence over the income category rules outlined in the instructions that follow for line 16, codes C and D–F, of Schedule K-1 (Form 1065) (or line 14, codes C and D–F, of Schedule K-1 (Form 1120S)), and the apportionment of deductions rules outlined in the instructions for line 16 later, codes H and I–K, (or line 14, codes H and I–K) of the Schedule K-1.

Reporting amounts on Form 1116.   Include amounts reported to you on Schedule K-1 with any other amounts reportable on Form 1116 using:
  • A separate Form 1116 for each category of income.

  • A separate column in Part I and a separate line in Part II for each country or possession.

Explanation of Certain Line Items on Schedule K-1

In each instance that follows, the first line reference is to the Schedule K-1 for Form 1065 and the second line reference is to the Schedule K-1 for Form 1120S. (The Schedule K-1 for Form 1065-B includes all foreign tax information in box 9 or in an attachment for box 9.)

Line 16, code B, or line 14, code B—Gross income from all sources.   Combine your distributive share of “gross income from all sources” with all of your other gross income and enter the total on line 3e. “Gross income from all sources” is a constant amount (that is, you will enter the same amount on line 3e of all Forms 1116 that you file).

Line 16, code C, or line 14, code C—Gross income sourced at partner or shareholder level.   This line includes income from the sale of eligible personal property (most personal property other than inventory, depreciable property, and certain intangible property). See Pub. 514 for details.

  
Although all income reported to you on this line of the Schedule K-1 has been apportioned to separate categories of income, you must nevertheless first determine (using the rules below) whether the income on this line is U.S. source income or foreign source income. Then, enter only foreign source income in Part I of each of the applicable Forms 1116 (that is, those Forms 1116 for each category of income you received from the partnership or S corporation).

  Use the following rules to source the income reported to you on this line of the Schedule K-1. If you are a U.S. resident (as defined below), the income is U.S. source income. If you are a nonresident (as defined below), the income is foreign source income.

U.S. resident.

A U.S. resident is a U.S. citizen or resident alien who does not have a tax home in a foreign country or a nonresident alien who has a tax home in the United States.

Tax home.

Generally, your tax home is the general area of your main place of business, employment, or post of duty, regardless of where you maintain your family home. Your tax home is the place where you are permanently or indefinitely engaged to work as an employee or self-employed individual. If you do not have a regular or main place of business because of the nature of your work, then your tax home is the place where you regularly live. If you do not fit either of these categories, you are considered an itinerant and your tax home is wherever you work.

Nonresident.

A nonresident is any person who is not a U.S. resident. U.S. citizens and resident aliens with a foreign tax home will not be treated as nonresidents for a sale of eligible personal property unless a foreign tax of 10% or more was paid or accrued on the gain on the sale (or, in the case of a loss sale, a foreign tax of 10% or more would have been paid had the sale resulted in a gain).

Note.

To help you with these rules, the partnership or S corporation has specifically identified the following.

  • Gains on the sale of eligible personal property for which a foreign tax of 10% or more was paid or accrued.

  • Losses on the sale of eligible personal property for which a foreign tax of 10% or more would have been paid had the sale resulted in a gain.

  Include foreign source income in Part I of the applicable Form 1116 (that is, the Form 1116 for each category of income provided to you for this line of the Schedule K-1). Do not include in Part I of Form 1116 income that you determined (using the above rules) to be U.S. source income.

  
If the partnership or S corporation has specifically identified any capital gains or losses or unrecaptured section 1250 gain on this line (Schedule K-1, line 16, code C, or line 14, code C) and you have determined that those gains or losses are foreign source, see Foreign Qualified Dividends and Capital Gains (Losses) later before entering an amount in Part I of Form 1116.

Line 16, codes D, E, and F, or line 14, codes D, E, and F—Foreign gross income sourced at partnership or S corporation level.   Income reported on this line has already been sourced for you by the partnership or S corporation. The partnership or S corporation has reported this income to you by country and by category of income. Include these amounts in Part I of each of the applicable Forms 1116 (that is, those Forms 1116 for each category of income you received).

You should disregard any information shown on your Schedule K-1 pertaining to gross income attributable to a foreign branch. It is intended only for corporate partners preparing Form 1118.

Line 16, code G, or line 14, code G—Interest expense.   See the instructions for line 4b later to allocate and apportion the interest expense shown on this line of Schedule K-1. In applying those instructions, take into account your distributive share of the partnership's or S corporation's gross income (for purposes of the $5,000 threshold) or your pro rata share of the partnership's or S corporation's assets. However, if you were a limited partner or an S corporation shareholder who did not actively participate in the management of the S corporation and your interest in the partnership or S corporation was less than 10%, see the next paragraph. Include interest expense that you allocate to foreign source income on line 4b of the applicable Form 1116. Do not enter in Part I of Form 1116 any interest expense that you allocate to U.S. source income.

Less-than-10% limited partners and certain less-than-10% S corporation shareholders.

If you are a limited partner or an S corporation shareholder (who does not actively participate in the management of the S corporation) and you own (directly or indirectly) a less-than-10% interest (by income) in the partnership or S corporation, you may generally allocate your distributive share of interest expense from that partnership or S corporation to foreign or U.S. source income based on your distributive share of the gross foreign or U.S. source income of that partnership or S corporation. The interest expense you allocate to foreign source income generally may be apportioned exclusively to passive category income. However, see Temporary Regulations section 1.861-9T(e)(4) for exceptions.

Line 16, code H, or line 14, code H—Other expenses.   This line includes expenses (other than interest expense) of the partnership or S corporation that must be allocated and apportioned at the partner or shareholder level (for example, research and experimental expenses).

  Combine your distributive share of these expenses with all of your other like expenses, if any, and then allocate and apportion them using the applicable rules (for example, for research and experimental expenses, the rules under Regulations section 1.861-17(f)).

  Include expenses that you allocate to foreign source income on line 2 of the applicable Form 1116. Expenses that you allocate to U.S. source income should not be entered on any line of Part I of Form 1116.

Line 16, codes I, J, and K, or line 14, codes I, J, and K—Deductions allocated and apportioned at partnership or S corporation level to foreign source income.   The partnership or S corporation has already allocated these expenses to foreign source income and has reported them to you by country and by category of income. Include these amounts on line 2 of each of the applicable Forms 1116 (that is, those Forms 1116 for each category of income you received).

  
You should disregard any information shown on your Schedule K-1 pertaining to definitely allocable deductions attributable to a foreign branch. It is intended only for corporate partners preparing Form 1118.

Line 16, codes L and M, or line 14, codes L and M—Total foreign taxes.   The partnership or S corporation has already allocated and apportioned total foreign taxes for you and has reported them to you by country and by category of income. Include these amounts in Part II of each of the applicable Forms 1116 (that is, those Forms 1116 for each category of income you received).

Line 16, code N, or line 14, code N—Reduction in taxes available for credit.   The partnership or S corporation has already apportioned the reduction in taxes available for credit and has reported it to you by country and by category of income. Include these amounts on line 12 of each of the applicable Forms 1116 (that is, those Forms 1116 for each category of income you received).

Foreign Qualified Dividends and Capital Gains (Losses)

Qualified dividends are the amounts you entered on Form 1040, line 9b, or Form 1040NR, line 10b.

If you have foreign source qualified dividends or foreign source capital gains (including any foreign source capital gain distributions) or losses, you may be required to make certain adjustments to those amounts before taking them into account on line 1a (gross income) or line 5 (losses).

If you completed the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet in the instructions for your tax return, and are not required to file Schedule D, see Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet (Individuals), next, to determine the adjustments you may be required to make. If you completed the Qualified Dividends Tax Worksheet in the Instructions for Form 1041, see Qualified Dividends Tax Worksheet (Estates and Trusts), later, to determine the adjustments you may be required to make. If you are required to file Schedule D, see Schedule D Filers, later, to determine the adjustments you may be required to make.

You can elect not to make the adjustments to your qualified dividends and capital gains if you qualify for the adjustment exception. See Adjustment exception under Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet (Individuals), Qualified Dividends Tax Worksheet (Estates and Trusts), and Schedule D Filers.

Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet (Individuals)

If you completed the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet in your tax return instructions and you do not have to file Schedule D, you may have to adjust the amount of your foreign source qualified dividends and capital gain distributions.

Form 1040 filers.   You must adjust the amount of your foreign source qualified dividends and capital gain distributions if both of the following apply:
  • Line 7 of the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet is greater than zero.

  • Line 25 of the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet is less than line 26 of that worksheet.

Form 1040NR filers.   You must adjust the amount of your foreign source qualified dividends and capital gain distributions if both of the following apply:
  • Line 5 of the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet is greater than zero.

  • Line 23 of the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet is less than line 24 of that worksheet.

Adjustment exception.   If you qualify for the adjustment exception, you can elect not to adjust your foreign source capital gain distributions and qualified dividends. You make this election by not adjusting these items. If you make this election, you must elect not to adjust any of your foreign source qualified dividends or capital gain distributions.

Adjustment exception for Form 1040 filers.

You qualify for the adjustment exception if you meet both of the following requirements.

  1. Line 7 of the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet does not exceed:

    1. $223,050 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er),

    2. $111,525 if married filing separately,

    3. $183,250 if single, or

    4. $203,150 if head of household.

  2. The amount of your foreign source capital gain distributions, plus the amount of your foreign source qualified dividends, is less than $20,000. For this purpose, ignore any capital gain distributions or qualified dividends you elected to include on Form 4952, line 4g.

Adjustment exception for Form 1040NR filers.

If you file Form 1040NR, you qualify for the adjustment exception if you meet both of the following requirements.

  1. Line 5 of the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet does not exceed:

    1. $223,050 if you checked filing status box 6,

    2. $111,525 if you checked filing status box 3, 4, or 5, or

    3. $183,250 if you checked filing status box 1 or 2.

  2. The amount of your foreign source capital gain distributions, plus the amount of your foreign source qualified dividends, is less than $20,000.

How to make adjustments.   To adjust your foreign source qualified dividends or capital gain distributions, multiply your foreign source qualified dividends or capital gain distributions in each separate category by 0.3788 if the foreign source qualified dividends or capital gain distributions are taxed at a rate of 15%, and by 0.5051 if they are taxed at a 20% rate. Include the results on line 1a of the applicable Form 1116.

  You adjust your foreign source qualified dividends or capital gain distributions taxed at the 0% rate by not including them on line 1a.

  
Do not adjust the amount of any foreign source qualified dividends or capital gain distributions that you elected to include on Form 4952, line 4g.

No adjustments required.   If you are not required to adjust the amount of your foreign source qualified dividends or capital gain distributions, or you qualify for the adjustment exception and elect not to adjust these items, include the amount of your foreign source qualified dividends and capital gain distributions in each separate category (without adjustment) on line 1a of the applicable Form 1116.

Qualified Dividends Tax Worksheet (Estates and Trusts)

If you completed the Qualified Dividends Tax Worksheet in the Instructions for Form 1041, you must adjust the amount of your foreign source qualified dividends if:

  • Line 5 of the Qualified Dividends Tax Worksheet is greater than zero, and

  • Line 21 of the Qualified Dividends Tax Worksheet is less than line 22 of that worksheet.

Adjustment exception.   If you qualify for the adjustment exception, you can elect not to adjust your foreign source qualified dividends. You make this election by not adjusting these dividends. If you make this election, you must elect not to adjust any of your foreign source qualified dividends. You qualify for the adjustment exception if:
  1. Line 5 of the Qualified Dividends Tax Worksheet does not exceed $8,750, and

  2. The amount of foreign source qualified dividends reported on Form 1041, line 2b(2), is less than $20,000. For this purpose, ignore any qualified dividends you elected to include on Form 4952, line 4g.

How to make adjustment.   To adjust your foreign source qualified dividends, multiply your foreign source qualified dividends in each separate category by 0.3788 if the foreign source qualified dividends are taxed at a rate of 15%, and by 0.5051 if they are taxed at a 20% rate. Include the results on line 1a.

  You adjust your foreign source qualified dividends taxed at the 0% rate by not including them on line 1a.

Do not adjust the amount of any foreign source qualified dividends that you elected to include on Form 4952, line 4g.

No adjustment required.   If you are not required to make adjustments to your foreign source qualified dividends (or you qualify for the adjustment exception and you elected not to adjust these dividends), include your foreign source qualified dividends on line 1a of the applicable Form 1116 without adjustment.

Schedule D Filers

Note.

Throughout these instructions, references to Schedule D (Form 1041) are for estates and trusts only.

Adjustments to foreign qualified dividends.   If you are required to file Schedule D (Form 1040, or Form 1041), you must adjust the amount of your foreign source qualified dividends that you include on line 1a of Form 1116 if one of the following applies to you.
  1. You figured your tax using the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet in the Form 1040 instructions, line 7 of that worksheet is greater than zero, and line 25 of that worksheet is less than line 26.

  2. You figured your tax using the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet in the Form 1040NR instructions, line 5 of that worksheet is greater than zero, and line 23 of that worksheet is less than line 24.

  3. You figured your tax using Schedule D (Form 1041), line 27 of Schedule D is greater than zero, and line 43 of Schedule D is less than line 44.

  4. You figured your tax using the Schedule D Tax Worksheet (in the Schedule D (Form 1040) instructions), line 18 of the Schedule D Tax Worksheet is greater than zero, and line 43 of the Schedule D Tax Worksheet is less than line 44.

  5. You figured your tax using the Schedule D Tax Worksheet (in the Schedule D (Form 1041) instructions), line 17 of the Schedule D Tax Worksheet is greater than zero, and line 42 of the Schedule D Tax Worksheet is less than line 43.

Adjustment exception.

If you qualify for the adjustment exception, you can elect not to adjust your foreign source qualified dividends. You make this election by not adjusting these dividends or your foreign capital gains (or losses). If you make this election, you must elect not to adjust any of your foreign source qualified dividends. You qualify for the adjustment exception if the amount of your foreign source net capital gain, plus the amount of your foreign source qualified dividends, is less than $20,000 and one of the following applies to you.

  1. Line 7 of the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet in the Form 1040 instructions or line 18 of the Schedule D Tax Worksheet in the Schedule D (Form 1040) instructions is less than or equal to:

    1. $223,050 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er),

    2. $111,525 if married filing separately,

    3. $183,250 if single, or

    4. $203,150 if head of household.

  2. Line 5 of the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet in the Form 1040NR instructions or line 18 of the Schedule D Tax Worksheet in the Schedule D (Form 1040) instructions is less than or equal to:

    1. $223,050 if you checked filing status box 6,

    2. $111,525 if you checked filing status box 3, 4, or 5, or

    3. $183,250 if you checked filing status box 1 or 2.

  3. Line 27 of Schedule D (Form 1041) or line 17 of the Schedule D Tax Worksheet in the Schedule D (Form 1041) instructions is less than or equal to $8,750.

Note.

Your foreign source net capital gain is the excess of your net long-term capital gain from foreign sources over your net short-term capital loss from foreign sources. Ignore any long-term capital gains you elected to include on Form 4952, line 4g, in determining your foreign source net capital gain. Ignore any qualified dividends you elected to include on Form 4952, line 4g, in determining the amount of your foreign source qualified dividends.

How to make adjustment.

To adjust your foreign source qualified dividends, multiply your foreign source qualified dividends in each separate category by 0.3788 if the foreign source qualified dividends are taxed at a rate of 15%, and by 0.5051 if they are taxed at a 20% rate. Include the results on line 1a of the applicable Form 1116.

You adjust your foreign source qualified dividends taxed at the 0% rate by not including them on line 1a.

Do not adjust the amount of any foreign source qualified dividends that you elected to include on Form 4952, line 4g.

No adjustment required.

If you are not required to adjust your foreign source qualified dividends (or you qualify for the adjustment exception and elect not to adjust these dividends), include on line 1a of Form 1116 the full amount of foreign source qualified dividends without adjustment.

Adjustments to foreign capital gains and losses.   You must use Worksheet A, Worksheet B, or the instructions for Capital Gains and Losses in Pub. 514 to determine the adjustments you must make to your foreign capital gains or losses. Read the instructions below to see if you qualify to use Worksheet A or Worksheet B. If you do not qualify to use Worksheet A or Worksheet B, use the instructions for Capital Gains and Losses in Pub. 514 to determine the adjustments you must make.

  
Before you complete Worksheet A or Worksheet B, you must reduce each foreign source long-term capital gain by the amount of that gain you elected to include on Form 4952, line 4g. The gain you elected to include on Form 4952, line 4g, must be entered directly on line 1a of the applicable Form 1116 without adjustment.

Worksheet A.

You can use Worksheet A later to determine the adjustments you must make to your foreign source capital gains or losses if you have foreign source capital gains or losses in no more than two separate categories and any of the following apply.

  • You qualify for the adjustment exception discussed earlier under Adjustments to foreign qualified dividends under Schedule D Filers and you did not make any adjustments to your foreign qualified dividends (if any).

  • Line 15 or 16 of Schedule D (Form 1040) (line 18a or 19 of Schedule D (Form 1041)) is zero or a loss.

  • You figured your tax using the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet in the Form 1040 instructions and (a) line 3 of that worksheet minus the amount on Form 4952, line 4e, that you elected to include on Form 4952, line 4g, is zero or less, (b) line 7 of that worksheet is zero, or (c) line 25 of that worksheet is equal to or greater than line 26.

  • You figured your tax using the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet in the Form 1040NR instructions and (a) line 3 of that worksheet is zero, (b) line 5 of that worksheet is zero, or (c) line 23 of that worksheet is equal to or greater than line 24.

  • You figured your tax using Schedule D (Form 1041) and (a) line 27 of Schedule D is zero, (b) line 22 of Schedule D minus the amount on Form 4952, line 4e, that you elected to include on Form 4952, line 4g, is zero or less, or (c) line 43 is equal to or greater than line 44.

  • You figured your tax using the Schedule D Tax Worksheet (in the Schedule D (Form 1040) instructions) and (a) line 18 is zero, (b) line 9 is zero or less, or (c) line 43 is equal to or greater than line 44.

  • You figured your tax using the Schedule D Tax Worksheet (in the Schedule D (Form 1041) instructions) and (a) line 17 is zero, (b) line 9 is zero or less, or (c) line 42 is equal to or greater than line 43.

Complete Worksheet A only once, even if you have capital gains or losses in two separate categories. Keep the completed Worksheet A for your records. Do not file Worksheet A with your tax return.

Capital losses are deductible only up to $3,000 ($1,500 if married filing separately) of ordinary income.

Worksheet B.

If you do not qualify to use Worksheet A, use Worksheet B later to determine the adjustments you must make to your foreign source capital gains or losses if:

  • You have foreign source capital gains or losses in no more than two separate categories,

  • You did not complete the Unrecaptured Section 1250 Gain Worksheet or the 28% Rate Gain Worksheet in the Schedule D instructions, and

  • You do not have any capital gains taxed at a rate of 0% or 20%.

Complete Worksheet B only once, even if you have capital gains or losses in two separate categories. Keep the completed Worksheet B for your records. Do not file Worksheet B with your tax return.

Capital losses are deductible only up to $3,000 ($1,500 if married filing separately) of ordinary income.

Worksheet A(See instructions)

      Category #1   Category #2    
  Specify ▶          
1. Separate category capital gain or (loss) 1.          
2. Foreign source capital gain net income 2.  
3. Capital gain net income 3.  
4. Total U.S. capital loss adjustment 4.  
5. Adjusted separate category capital gain 5.  
6. U.S. capital loss adjustment factor. (For each separate category, divide line 1 by line 2 and round off the result  
to at least four decimal places.)
6.          
7. U.S. capital loss adjustment. (For each separate category, multiply line 4 by line 6.) 7.          
8. Adjusted separate category capital gain. (For each  
separate category, subtract line 7 from line 1. Enter  
the result here and include the result on line 1a of the  
applicable Form 1116.)
8.          
Instructions for Worksheet A
Line 1. For each separate category for which you have foreign source capital gains or losses, combine your foreign source capital gains and losses in that separate category and enter the result on line 1. Show a loss on line 1 of this worksheet as a negative amount and include the loss on line 5 of the Form 1116 you are filing for that separate category.
Line 2. Combine the amounts entered on line 1. If the result is zero or less, do not complete the rest of the worksheet. Instead, for each separate category with a positive amount on line 1 of this worksheet, include that positive amount on line 1a of the Form 1116 you are filing for that separate category.
Line 3. Enter the amount from line 16 of Schedule D (Form 1040), less the portion of net capital gain you included on Form 4952, line 4g. If the result is zero or less, enter -0-.  
Estates and trusts: Enter the amount from line 19 of Schedule D (Form 1041), less any amount shown on line 25 of that Schedule D. If the result is zero or less, enter -0-.
Line 4. Subtract line 3 from line 2 and enter the result on line 4. If the result is zero or less, do not complete the rest of the worksheet. Instead, for each separate category with a positive amount on line 1 of this worksheet, include that positive amount on line 1a of the Form 1116 you are filing for that separate category.
Line 5.
  • If both separate categories have a positive amount on line 1, skip line 5 and go to line 6.

  • If only one separate category has a positive amount on line 1, subtract line 4 from that positive amount. Enter the result here and include the result on line 1a of the Form 1116 you are filing for that separate category. Skip lines 6–8 of this worksheet.

Worksheet B(See instructions)

  Category #1 
 
Specify ▶____________
Category #2 
 
Specify ▶__________
 
  (1) 
Short-Term 
(2) 
Long-Term 
(15%)
(3) 
Short-Term 
(4) 
Long-Term 
(15%)
(5) 
Other
1. Separate category rate group capital gain or (loss)          
2. U.S. capital loss adjustment amount          
3. Subtotal (subtract line 2 from line 1 gain amounts)          
4. Net U.S. long-term capital loss          
5. U.S. long-term capital loss adjustment          
6. Excess net U.S. long-term capital loss          
7. Long-term capital gain (or adjustment amount)          
8. Limitation percentage          
9. Long-term limitation amounts          
10. Adjustment amounts          
11. Rate differential adjustments          
12. Long-term gains          
13. Rate differential adjustment          
14. Long-term gain          
15. Adjusted separate category capital gains and losses          

Instructions for Worksheet B

 
Line 1.For each separate category:
  • Combine your foreign source short-term capital gains and losses and enter the result in column (1) or (3).

  • Combine your foreign source long-term capital gains and losses and enter the result in column (2) or (4).

Line 2.Complete the Line 2 Worksheet later for each column on line 1 with a gain.
Line 4. Enter your net long-term capital loss (if any) from U.S. sources. To determine this amount, subtract your long-term capital losses from U.S. sources from your long-term capital gains from U.S. sources. Enter the loss (if any) as a positive amount in column (5). If you do not have a loss, leave line 4 blank and skip lines 5 through 14.
Line 5. Combine the amounts (if any) from columns (2) and (4) on line 2. Enter the result in column (5). If you do not have any amount entered in either column, enter -0- in column (5).
Line 6. Subtract line 5 from line 4. Enter the result in column (5). If the result is zero or less, leave line 6 blank and skip lines 7 through 14 of this worksheet.
Line 7.
  • If you entered an amount in either column (2) or (4) (but not both) of line 3, subtract line 6 from the amount entered in either column (2) or (4) of line 3. Enter the result in column (2) or (4) on line 7 and skip lines 8 through 12.

  • If you entered amounts in both columns (2) and (4) on line 3, combine those amounts and enter the result in column (5) on line 7.

Line 8. Divide each amount on line 3 by line 7 and enter the results on line 8. Round off each result to at least four decimal places.
Line 9. Multiply each decimal amount on line 8 by line 6 and enter the results in the appropriate columns on line 9.
Line 10. Subtract line 9, column (2) from line 3, column (2) and enter the result on line 10, column (2). Subtract line 9, column (4) from line 3, column (4) and enter the result on line 10, column (4).
Line 11. Multiply each amount on line 10 by 0.3788 and enter the results here.
Line 12. Combine line 11, column (2) with line 9, column (2) and enter the result on line 12, column (2). Combine line 11, column (4) with line 9, column (4) and enter the result on line 12, column (4). Include the amounts on line 1a of the applicable Form 1116. Skip lines 13 and 14.
Line 13. Multiply the amount on line 7 by 0.3788 and enter the result here in the applicable column.
Line 14. Combine line 6 and line 13 and enter the result here. Include the result on line 1a of the applicable Form 1116.
Line 15. 
If you have a:
  • Short-term gain shown in column (1) or (3) of line 3, enter the amount of that short-term gain on line 15, column (1) or (3).

  • Long-term gain shown in column (2) or (4) of line 3, and line 6 is blank, multiply the amount of each gain by 0.3788 and enter the result on line 15, column (2) or (4).

  • Short-term loss in any column of line 1, complete the Line 15 Worksheet later for each column with a loss.

  • Long-term loss in column (2) or (4) of line 1, multiply the amount of the loss by 0.3788 and enter the result on line 15 in the appropriate column.

 
After you have completed line 15:
  • Include line 15 gain amounts on line 1a of the applicable Form 1116.

  • Include line 15 loss amounts on line 5 of the applicable Form 1116.

Line 2 Worksheet (For Line 2 of Worksheet B) 
(See instructions below)

    Category #1 Category #2    
  Specify ▶        
1. Separate category rate group  
gain (or loss)
1.            
      Short-Term Long-Term Short-Term Long-Term    
2. Separate category gain (or loss) 2.        
3. Foreign source capital gain net income 3.  
4. Capital gain net income 4.  
5. Total U.S. capital loss adjustment 5.  
6. Separate category adjustment 6.        
7. Rate Group Factor 7.            
8. Rate Group Adjustment 8.            
Instructions for Line 2 Worksheet
Line 1.Enter your gains and losses from line 1 of Worksheet B. Enter a loss as a negative amount (in parentheses).
Line 2. For each separate category, combine the amounts from line 1. Enter a loss as a negative amount (in parentheses).
Line 3.Combine the amounts from line 2 of this worksheet. If the result is zero or less, stop here. Do not enter any amount on line 2 of Worksheet B.
Line 4.Enter the amount from line 16 of the Schedule D (Form 1040), less the portion of net capital gain you included on Form 4952, line 4g. If the amount entered on line 4 is zero or less, stop here. Do not continue with this worksheet or Worksheet B. Instead, complete Worksheet A. 
Estates and trusts: Enter the amount from line 19 of the Schedule D (Form 1041), less any amount shown on line 25 of that Schedule D. If the amount entered on line 4 is zero or less, stop here. Do not continue with this worksheet or Worksheet B. Instead, complete Worksheet A.
Line 5.Subtract line 4 from line 3 and enter the result on line 5. If the result is zero or less, stop here. Do not enter any amount on line 2 of Worksheet B.
Line 6.
  • If only one separate category has a positive amount on line 2, enter the amount from line 5 on line 6 (in the column for the separate category with the positive amount on line 2).

  • If both separate categories have positive amounts on line 2, divide each amount on line 2 by line 3. Multiply each result by line 5. Enter the results on line 6 in the appropriate columns.

Line 7. 
For each separate category:
  • If you entered an amount on line 6 and you entered positive amounts in both the short-term and long-term columns on line 1, divide each positive amount on line 1 by line 2 and enter the results in the appropriate columns.

  • Leave line 7 blank if you did not enter an amount on line 6 or only one column on line 1 has a positive amount.

Line 8. 
For each separate category:
  • If you entered amounts on line 7, multiply each amount on line 7 by line 6. Enter the results in the appropriate columns on line 8 of this worksheet and on line 2 of Worksheet B.

  • If line 7 is blank, enter the amount from line 6 in the same column on line 8 as the column that has a gain on line 1. Also, enter the amount on line 2 of Worksheet B in the appropriate column. If line 6 is blank, do not enter any amount on line 8 of this worksheet or line 2 of Worksheet B.

Line 15 Worksheet (For Line 15 of Worksheet B)

1. Enter your net short-term capital gain (if any) from U.S. sources. To determine this amount, subtract your short-term capital losses from U.S. sources from your short-term capital gains from U.S. sources. If the result is zero or a loss, enter -0- 1.  
2. If you entered a short-term gain on line 3 of Worksheet B, enter that amount here 2.  
3. Add lines 1 and 2 3.  
4. Did you enter a short-term capital loss on line 1 of Worksheet B for one (but not both) of the separate categories?  
    Yes. Complete lines 5–10 and skip the rest of this worksheet.  
    No. Skip lines 5–10 and go to line 11.  
5. Enter the short-term capital loss from line 1 of Worksheet B (enter the loss as a positive amount) 5.  
6. Enter the gain, if any, determined on line 3. If line 3 is not a gain, enter -0-. 6.  
7. Subtract line 6 from line 5. If zero or a loss, enter -0- 7.  
8. Multiply line 7 by 0.3788 8.  
9. Enter the smaller of line 5 or line 6 9.  
10. Add lines 8 and 9. Enter the result here and on line 15 of Worksheet B 10.  
11. Is the amount on line 1 zero?    
    Yes. Multiply each short-term loss by 0.3788. Enter the results on line 15 of Worksheet B. Skip the rest of this worksheet.    
    No. Go to line 12.
12. Enter your short-term loss from Worksheet B, line 1, column (1) (enter the loss as a positive amount) 12.  
13. Enter your short-term loss from Worksheet B, line 1, column (3) (enter the loss as a positive amount) 13.  
14. Add lines 12 and 13 14.  
15. Enter the gain determined in line 1 15.  
16. Subtract line 15 from line 14. 16.  
  Is the result zero or less?    
    Yes. Skip the rest of this worksheet. Enter each short-term loss from line 1 on line 15 of Worksheet B, in the applicable column, without adjustment (that is, each short-term loss you enter on line 15 of Worksheet B will be the same as the short-term loss you entered on line 1 of Worksheet B).    
    No. Complete lines 17–22.  
17. Multiply line 16 by 0.3788 17.  
18. Add lines 15 and 17 18.  
19. Divide line 12 by line 14. 19.  
20. Multiply line 19 by line 18. Enter the result here and on Worksheet B, line 15, column (1) 20.  
21. Divide line 13 by line 14. 21.  
22. Multiply line 21 by line 18. Enter the result here and on Worksheet B, line 15, column (3) 22.  


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