1040A - Introductory Material


The Taxpayer Advocate Service Is Here To Help You 
 
 
What is the Taxpayer Advocate Service? 
The Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS) is an independent organization within the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) that helps taxpayers and protects taxpayer rights. Our job is to ensure that every taxpayer is treated fairly and that you know and understand your rights under the Taxpayer Bill of Rights.  
 
What can the Taxpayer Advocate Service do for you? 
We can help you resolve problems that you can’t resolve with the IRS. And our service is free. If you qualify for our assistance, your advocate will be with you at every turn and do everything possible. TAS can help you if:
  • Your problem is causing financial difficulty for you, your family, or your business.

  • You face (or your business is facing) an immediate threat of adverse action.

  • You’ve tried repeatedly to contact the IRS but no one has responded, or the IRS hasn’t responded by the date promised.

 
 
How can you reach us? 
We have offices in every state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Your local advocate’s number is at www.TaxpayerAdvocate.irs.gov, at www.irs.gov/advocate, and in your local directory. You can also call us at 1-877-777-4778. 
 
How can you learn about your taxpayer rights? 
The Taxpayer Bill of Rights describes ten basic rights that all taxpayers have when dealing with the IRS. Our Tax Toolkit at www.TaxpayerAdvocate.irs.gov can help you understand what these rights mean to you and how they apply. These are your rights. Know them. Use them. 
 
How else does the Taxpayer Advocate Service help taxpayers? 
TAS works to resolve large-scale problems that affect many taxpayers. If you know of one of these broad issues, please report it to us at www.irs.gov/sams.
Low Income Taxpayer Clinics Help Taxpayers
Low Income Taxpayer Clinics (LITCs) are independent from the IRS. Some serve individuals whose income is below a certain level and who need to resolve a tax problem. These clinics provide professional representation before the IRS or in court on audits, appeals, tax collection disputes, and other issues for free or for a small fee. Some clinics provide information about taxpayer rights and responsibilities in many different languages for individuals who speak English as a second language. For more information, and to find a clinic near you, read the LITC page on www.irs.gov/litc or IRS Publication 4134, Low Income Taxpayer Clinic List. You can also get this publication at your local IRS office or by calling 1-800-829-3676.
 
Suggestions for Improving the IRS 
 
Taxpayer Advocacy Panel
 
Have a suggestion for improving the IRS and do not know who to contact? The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP) is a diverse group of citizen volunteers who listen to taxpayers, identify taxpayers’ issues, and make suggestions for improving IRS service and customer satisfaction. The panel is demographically and geographically diverse, with at least one member from each state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Contact TAP at www.improveirs.org or 1-888-912-1227 (toll-free).
 

What's New

Introduction

For information about any additional changes to the 2015 tax law or any other developments affecting Form 1040A or its instructions, go to www.irs.gov/form1040a.

Information reporting about health coverage.   If you or someone in your family had health coverage in 2015, the provider of that coverage is required to send you a Form 1095-A, 1095-B, or 1095-C (with Part III completed), that lists individuals in your family who were enrolled in the coverage and shows their months of coverage. You may use this information to help complete line 38. However, you do not need to wait to receive these forms to file your return. You may have had health care coverage for some or all of 2015 even if you didn’t receive a form with this information, and you may rely on other information about your coverage to complete line 38.

  For more information on why your health provider might be asking for your social security number, go to www.irs.gov/ACASSN.

Information reporting about employer offer of coverage.   If you or someone in your family was an employee in 2015, the employer may be required to send you a Form 1095-C. Part II of Form 1095-C shows whether your employer offered you health insurance coverage and, if so, information about the offer. This information may be relevant if you purchased health insurance coverage for 2015 through the Health Insurance Marketplace and wish to claim the premium tax credit on line 45. However, you do not need to wait to receive this form to file your return. You may rely on other information received from your employer. If you do not wish to claim the premium tax credit for 2015, you do not need the information in Part II. For more information on who is eligible for the premium tax credit, see the instructions for Form 8962.

Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) account.   This is a new type of savings account for individuals with disabilities and their families. For 2015, you can contribute up to $14,000. Distributions are tax free if used to pay the beneficiary's qualified disability expenses. Don't deduct your contributions on your tax return. For details, see Pub. 907.

Due date of return.    File Form 1040 by April 18, 2016. The due date is April 18, instead of April 15, because of the Emancipation Day holiday in the District of Columbia—even if you do not live in the District of Columbia. If you live in Maine or Massachusetts, you have until April 19, 2016. That is because of the Patriots' Day holiday in those states.

Public safety officers.   Certain amounts received because of the death of a public safety officer are nontaxable. See Pub. 525 for details.

Direct deposits of refund to a myRA® account.   You now can have your refund directly deposited to a new retirement savings program called myRA®. This is a starter retirement account offered by the Department of the Treasury. See the instructions for lines 48a through 48d. For more information and to open a myRA account online, visit www.myRA.gov.

Earned income credit.   If you didn't have a social security number (an SSN) by the due date of your 2015 return (including extensions), you can't claim the EIC on either your original or an amended 2015 return, even if you later get an SSN. Also, if a child didn't have an SSN by the due date of your return (including extensions), you can't count that child as a qualifying child in figuring the EIC on either your original or an amended 2015 return, even if that child later gets an SSN. See the instructions for lines 42a and 42b.

Child tax credit.   If you didn't have an SSN (or ITIN) by the due date of your 2015 return (including extensions), you can't claim the child tax credit on either your original or an amended 2015 return, even if you later get an SSN (or ITIN). Also, no credit is allowed on either your original or an amended 2015 return with respect to a child who didn't have an SSN, ATIN, or ITIN by the due date of your return (including extensions), even if that child later gets one of those numbers. See the instructions for line 35.

American opportunity credit.   If you didn't have an SSN (or ITIN) by the due date of your 2015 return (including extensions), you can't claim the American opportunity credit on either your original or an amended 2015 return, even if you later get an SSN (or ITIN). Also, you can't claim this credit on your original or an amended 2015 return for a student who didn't have an SSN, ATIN, or ITIN by the due date of your return (including extensions), even if the student later gets one of those numbers. See Pub. 970 and the instructions for Form 8863 for more information.

Health care individual responsibility payment increased.   If you or someone in your household didn’t have qualifying health care coverage or qualify for a coverage exemption for one or more months of 2015, the amount of your shared responsibility payment may be much more this year than it was last year. Like last year, you must either:
  • Indicate on line 38 that you, your spouse (if filing jointly), and anyone you can or do claim as a dependent had qualifying health care coverage throughout 2015,

  • Attach Form 8965 to claim an exemption from the requirement to have health care coverage, or

  • Make a shared responsibility payment if, for any month in 2015, you, your spouse (if filing jointly), or anyone you can or do claim as a dependent didn’t have coverage and don't qualify for a coverage exemption.

For more information, see the instructions for line 38 and Form 8965.

Requirement to reconcile advance payments of the premium tax credit.   If you or a family member enrolled in health insurance through the Marketplace and advance payments of the premium tax credit were made to your insurance company to reduce your monthly premium payment, you must attach Form 8962 to your return to reconcile (compare) the advance payments with your premium tax credit for the year, which you figure on Form 8962. The Marketplace is required to send Form 1095-A by February 1, 2016, listing the advance payments and other information you need to figure your premium tax credit. Use Form 1095-A to complete Form 8962. Attach Form 8962 to your return. Don't attach Form 1095-A to your return.

Form W-2 verification code.   The IRS is testing the use of a 16-character code to verify certain Forms W-2. If you are e-filing and your Form W-2 includes a code in a box labeled “Verification Code,” enter the code when prompted by your software; disregard the prompt if your Form W-2 doesn't have the code. If you are filing a paper Form 1040A, you don't have to use the code.

Filing Requirements

Introduction

These rules apply to all U.S. citizens, regardless of where they live, and resident aliens.

Have you tried IRS e-file? It's the fastest way to get your refund and it's free if you are eligible. Visit IRS.gov for details.

Do You Have To File?

Use Chart A, B, or C to see if you must file a return.

Even if you don't otherwise have to file a return, you should file one to get a refund of any federal income tax withheld. You should also file if you are eligible for any of the following credits.

  • Earned income credit.

  • Additional child tax credit.

  • American opportunity credit.

  • Credit for federal tax on fuels (must file Form 1040).

  • Premium tax credit.

  • Health coverage tax credit (must file Form 1040).

See Pub. 501 for details. Also see Pub. 501 if you don't have to file but received a Form 1099-B (or substitute statement).

Premium tax credit.   If advance payments of the premium tax credit were made for you, your spouse with whom you are filing a joint return, or a dependent who enrolled in coverage through the Marketplace, you must file a 2015 return and attach Form 8962.

  You (or whoever enrolled you) should have received Form 1095-A from the Marketplace with information about your coverage and any advance payments. You must attach Form 8962 even if someone else enrolled you, your spouse, or your dependent. If you are a dependent who is claimed on someone else's 2015 return, you do not have to attach Form 8962.

Exception for certain children under age 19 or full-time students.   If certain conditions apply, you can elect to include on your return the income of a child who was under age 19 at the end of 2015 or was a full-time student under age 24 at the end of 2015. To do so, use Form 1040 and Form 8814. If you make this election, your child doesn't have to file a return. For details, use Tax Topic 553 or see Form 8814.

  A child born on January 1, 1992, is considered to be age 24 at the end of 2015. Don't use Form 8814 for such a child.

Resident aliens.   These rules also apply if you were a resident alien. Also, you may qualify for certain tax treaty benefits. See Pub. 519 for details.

Nonresident aliens and dual-status aliens.   These rules also apply if you were a nonresident alien or dual-status alien and both of the following apply.
  • You were married to a U.S. citizen or resident alien at the end of 2015.

  • You elected to be taxed as a resident alien.

 
See Pub. 519 for details.

Specific rules apply to determine if you are a resident alien, nonresident alien, or dual-status alien. Most nonresident aliens and dual-status aliens have different filing requirements and may have to file Form 1040NR or Form 1040NR-EZ. Pub. 519 discusses these requirements and other information to help aliens comply with U.S. tax law.

When and Where Should You File?

File Form 1040A by April 18, 2016. (The due date is April 18, instead of April 15, because of the Emancipation Day holiday in the District of Columbia—even if you do not live in the District of Columbia. If you live in Maine or Massachusetts, you have until April 19, 2016, because of the Patriots' Day holiday in those states.) If you file after this date, you may have to pay interest and penalties. See Interest and Penalties, later.

If you were serving in, or in support of, the U.S. Armed Forces in a designated combat zone or contingency operation, you may be able to file later. See Pub. 3 for details.

If you e-file your return, there is no need to mail it. See the e-file page earlier or IRS.gov for more information. However, if you choose to mail it, filing instructions and addresses are at the end of these instructions.

What If You Can't File on Time?

You can get an automatic 6-month extension if, no later than the date your return is due, you file Form 4868. For details, see Form 4868. Instead of filing Form 4868, you can apply for an automatic extension by making an electronic payment by the due date of your return.

An automatic 6-month extension to file doesn't extend the time to pay your tax. If you don't pay your tax by the original due date of your return, you will owe interest on the unpaid tax and may owe penalties. See Form 4868.

If you are a U.S. citizen or resident alien, you may qualify for an automatic extension of time to file without filing Form 4868. You qualify if, on the due date of your return, you meet one of the following conditions.

  • You live outside the United States and Puerto Rico and your main place of business or post of duty is outside the United States and Puerto Rico.

  • You are in military or naval service on duty outside the United States and Puerto Rico.

This extension gives you an extra 2 months to file and pay the tax, but interest will be charged from the original due date of the return on any unpaid tax. You must include a statement showing that you meet the requirements. If you are still unable to file your return by the end of the 2-month period, you can get an additional 4 months if, no later than June 15, 2016, you file Form 4868. This 4-month extension of time to file doesn't extend the time to pay your tax. See Form 4868.

Private Delivery Services

If you choose to mail your return, you can use certain private delivery services designated by the IRS to meet the "timely mailing treated as timely filing/paying" rule for tax returns and payments. These private delivery services include only the following.

  • Federal Express (FedEx): FedEx First Overnight, FedEx Priority Overnight, FedEx Standard Overnight, FedEx 2 Day, FedEx International Next Flight Out, FedEx International Priority, FedEx International First, FedEx International Economy.

  • United Parcel Service (UPS): UPS Next Day Air Early AM, UPS Next Day Air, UPS Next Day Air Saver, UPS 2nd Day Air, UPS 2nd Day Air A.M., UPS Worldwide Express Plus, UPS Worldwide Express.

For more information, go to IRS.gov and enter “private delivery service” in the search box. The search results will direct you to the IRS mailing address to use if you are using a private delivery service. You will also find any updates to the list of designated private delivery services. The private delivery service can tell you how to get written proof of the mailing date.

Chart A—For Most People

IF your filing status is . . . AND at the end of 
2015 you were* . . .
THEN file a return if your 
gross income** was at least . . .
 
Single 
(see the instructions for line 1)
under 65 
65 or older
  $10,300 
11,850
   
Married filing jointly*** 
(see the instructions for line 2)
under 65 (both spouses) 
65 or older (one spouse) 
65 or older (both spouses)
  $20,600 
21,850 
23,100
   
Married filing separately 
(see the instructions for line 3)
any age   $4,000    
Head of household 
(see the instructions for line 4)
under 65 
65 or older
  $13,250 
14,800
   
Qualifying widow(er) with dependent child (see the instructions for line 5) under 65 
65 or older
  $16,600 
17,850
   
* If you were born on January 1, 1951, you are considered to be age 65 at the end of 2015. (If your spouse died in 2015 or if you are preparing a return for someone who died in 2015, see Pub. 501.) 
** Gross income means all income you received in the form of money, goods, property, and services that isn't exempt from tax, including any income from sources outside the United States or from the sale of your main home (even if you can exclude part or all of it). Don't include any social security benefits unless (a) you are married filing a separate return and you lived with your spouse at any time in 2015 or (b) one-half of your social security benefits plus your other gross income and any tax-exempt interest is more than $25,000 ($32,000 if married filing jointly). If (a) or (b) applies, see the instructions for lines 14a and 14b to figure the taxable part of social security benefits you must include in gross income. 
*** If you didn't live with your spouse at the end of 2015 (or on the date your spouse died) and your gross income was at least $4,000, you must file a return regardless of your age.
 

Chart B—For Children and Other Dependents

 
See the instructions for line 6c to find out if someone can claim you as a dependent. 

If your parent (or someone else) can claim you as a dependent, use this chart to see if you must file a return.
In this chart, unearned income includes taxable interest, ordinary dividends, and capital gain distributions. It also includes unemployment compensation, taxable social security benefits, pensions, annuities, and distributions of unearned income from a trust. Earned income includes salaries, wages, tips, professional fees, and taxable scholarship and fellowship grants. Gross income is the total of your unearned and earned income.
Single dependents. Were you either age 65 or older or blind?
 
No. You must file a return if any of the following apply.
   
  • Your unearned income was over $1,050.

  • Your earned income was over $6,300.

  • Your gross income was more than the larger of—

     
  • $1,050, or

  • Your earned income (up to $5,950) plus $350.

 
Yes. You must file a return if any of the following apply.
   
  • Your unearned income was over $2,600 ($4,150 if 65 or older and blind).

  • Your earned income was over $7,850 ($9,400 if 65 or older and blind).

  • Your gross income was more than the larger of—

     
  • $2,600 ($4,150 if 65 or older and blind), or

  • Your earned income (up to $5,950) plus $1,900 ($3,450 if 65 or older and blind).

Married dependents. Were you either age 65 or older or blind?
 
No. You must file a return if any of the following apply.
   
  • Your unearned income was over $1,050.

  • Your earned income was over $6,300.

  • Your gross income was at least $5 and your spouse files a separate return and itemizes deductions.

  • Your gross income was more than the larger of—

     
  • $1,050, or

  • Your earned income (up to $5,950) plus $350.

 
Yes. You must file a return if any of the following apply.
   
  • Your unearned income was over $2,300 ($3,550 if 65 or older and blind).

  • Your earned income was over $7,550 ($8,800 if 65 or older and blind).

  • Your gross income was at least $5 and your spouse files a separate return and itemizes deductions.

  • Your gross income was more than the larger of—

     
  • $2,300 ($3,550 if 65 or older and blind), or

  • Your earned income (up to $5,950) plus $1,600 ($2,850 if 65 or older and blind).

Chart C—Other Situations When You Must File

You must file a return for 2015 if you owe tax from the recapture of an education credit or the alternative minimum tax. See the instructions for line 28. You must also file a return for 2015 if advance payments of the premium tax credit were made for you, your spouse, or a dependent who enrolled in coverage through the Marketplace. You or whoever enrolled you should have received Form(s) 1095-A showing the amount of the advance payments.
You must file a return using Form 1040 if any of the following apply for 2015.
  • You owe any special taxes, such as social security and Medicare tax on tips you didn't report to your employer or on wages you received from an employer who didn't withhold these taxes.

  • You owe write-in taxes, including uncollected social security and Medicare or RRTA tax on tips you reported to your employer or on your group-term life insurance, or additional tax on a health savings account.

  • You had net earnings from self-employment of at least $400.

  • You had wages of $108.28 or more from a church or qualified church-controlled organization that is exempt from employer social security and Medicare taxes.

  • You owe additional tax on a qualified plan, including an individual retirement arrangement (IRA), or other tax-favored account. But if you are filing a return only because you owe this tax, you can file Form 5329 by itself.

  • You owe household employment taxes. But if you are filing a return only because you owe this tax, you can file Schedule H (Form 1040) by itself.

  • You owe any recapture taxes, including repayment of the first-time homebuyer credit.

  • You (or your spouse, if filing jointly) received health savings account, Archer MSA, or Medicare Advantage MSA distributions.

 

Would It Help You To Itemize Deductions on Form 1040?

           
  You may be able to reduce your tax by itemizing deductions on Schedule A (Form 1040). Itemized deductions include amounts you paid for state and local income or sales taxes, real estate taxes, personal property taxes, and mortgage interest. You may also include gifts to charity and part of the amount you paid for medical and dental expenses. You would usually benefit by itemizing if—
  Your filing status is: AND Your itemized deductions are more than:
  Single        
  • Under 65

  • 65 or older or blind

  • 65 or older and blind

   
  • $6,300

  • 7,850

  • 9,400

 
  Married filing jointly        
  • Under 65 (both spouses)

  • 65 or older or blind (one spouse)

  • 65 or older or blind (both spouses)

  • 65 or older and blind (one spouse)

  • 65 or older or blind (one spouse) and 
    65 or older and blind (other spouse)

  • 65 or older and blind (both spouses)

   
  • $12,600

  • 13,850

  • 15,100

  • 15,100

 
  • 16,350

 
 
  • 17,600

 
  Married filing separately*
  • Your spouse itemizes deductions

  • Under 65

  • 65 or older or blind

  • 65 or older and blind

   
  • $0

  • 6,300

  • 7,550

  • 8,800

 
  Head of household
  • Under 65

  • 65 or older or blind

  • 65 or older and blind

   
  • $9,250

  • 10,800

  • 12,350

 
  Qualifying widow(er) with dependent child
  • Under 65

  • 65 or older or blind

  • 65 or older and blind

   
  • $12,600

  • 13,850

  • 15,100

 
* If you can take an exemption for your spouse, complete the Standard Deduction Worksheet for the amount that applies to you.
If someone can claim you as a dependent, it would benefit you to itemize if your itemized deductions total more than your standard deduction figured on the Standard Deduction Worksheet.

Where To Report Certain Items From 2015 Forms W-2, 1097, 1098, and 1099

File electronically. You may be eligible for free tax software that will take the guesswork out of preparing your return. Free File makes available free brand-name software and free e-file. Visit www.irs.gov/freefile for details.

 
If any federal income tax withheld is shown on these forms, include the tax withheld on Form 1040A, line 40.

  Form Item and Box in Which It Should Appear   Where To Report
  W-2 Wages, tips, other compensation (box 1)   Form 1040A, line 7
    Allocated tips (box 8)   See Wages, Salaries, Tips, etc.
    Dependent care benefits (box 10)   Form 2441, Part III
    Adoption benefits (box 12, code T)   Must file Form 1040
    Employer contributions to an Archer MSA (box 12, code R)   Must file Form 1040
    Employer contributions to a health savings account (box 12, code W)   Must file Form 1040 if required to file Form 8889 (see instructions for Form 8889)
    Uncollected social security and Medicare or RRTA tax (box 12, Code A, B, M, or N)   Must file Form 1040
  W-2G Gambling winnings (box 1)   Must file Form 1040
  1097-BTC Bond tax credit   Must file Form 1040 to take
  1098 Mortgage interest (box 1) 
Points (box 2)
  Must file Form 1040 to deduct
    Refund of overpaid interest (box 3)   See the instructions on Form 1098
    Mortgage insurance premiums (box 4)   Must file Form 1040 to deduct
  1098-C Contributions of motor vehicles, boats, and airplanes Must file Form 1040 to deduct
  1098-E Student loan interest (box 1)   See the instructions for Form 1040A, line 18
  1098-MA Home mortgage payments (box 3)   Must file Form 1040 to deduct
  1098-T Qualified tuition and related expenses (box 1)   See the instructions for Form 1040A, line 19, or line 33, but first see the instructions on Form 1098-T
  1099-A Acquisition or abandonment of secured property   See Pub. 4681
  1099-B Broker and barter exchange transactions   Must file Form 1040
  1099-C Canceled debt (box 2)   Generally must file Form 1040 (see Pub. 4681)
  1099-DIV Total ordinary dividends (box 1a)   Form 1040A, line 9a
    Qualified dividends (box 1b)   See the instructions for Form 1040A, line 9b
    Total capital gain distributions (box 2a)   See the instructions for Form 1040A, line 10
    Amount reported in box 2b, 2c, or 2d   Must file Form 1040
    Nondividend distributions (box 3)   Must file Form 1040 if required to report as capital gains (see the instructions on Form 1099-DIV)
    Investment expenses (box 5)   Must file Form 1040 to deduct
    Foreign tax paid (box 6)   Must file Form 1040 to deduct or take a credit for the tax
  1099-G Unemployment compensation (box 1)   See the instructions for Form 1040A, line 13
    State or local income tax refund (box 2)   See the instructions underRefunds of State or Local Income Taxes, later
    Amount reported in box 5, 6, 7, or 9   Must file Form 1040
  1099-INT Interest income (box 1)   See the instructions on Form 1099-INT and the instructions for Form 1040A, line 8a
    Early withdrawal penalty (box 2)   Must file Form 1040 to deduct
    Interest on U.S. savings bonds and Treasury obligations  
(box 3)
See the instructions for Form 1040A, line 8a
    Investment expenses (box 5)   Must file Form 1040 to deduct
    Foreign tax paid (box 6)   Must file Form 1040 to deduct or take a credit for the tax
    Tax-exempt interest (box 8)   Form 1040A, line 8b
    Specified private activity bond interest (box 9)   Must file Form 1040
    Market discount (box 10),   Form 1040A, line 8a
    Bond premium (box 11) and bond premium on tax-exempt bond (box 13)   See instructions on Form 1099-INT and Pub. 550
  1099-K Payment card and third party network transactions   Must file Form 1040
  1099-LTC Long-term care and accelerated death benefits   Must file Form 1040 if required to file Form 8853 (see the instructions for Form 8853)
  1099-MISC Miscellaneous income   Must file Form 1040
  1099-OID Original issue discount (box 1)   See the instructions on Form 1099-OID
    Other periodic interest (box 2)   See the instructions on Form 1099-OID
    Early withdrawal penalty (box 3)   Must file Form 1040 to deduct
    Market discount (box 5)   Form 1040A, line 8a
    Acquisition premium (box 6)   See the instructions on Form 1099-OID and Pub. 550
    Original issue discount on U.S. Treasury obligations (box 8)   See the instructions on Form 1099-OID
    Investment expenses (box 9)   Must file Form 1040 to deduct
  1099-PATR Patronage dividends and other distributions from a cooperative (boxes 1, 2, 3, and 5)   Must file Form 1040 if taxable (see the instructions on Form 1099-PATR)
    Domestic production activities deduction (box 6)   Must file Form 1040 to deduct
    Amount reported in box 7, 8, 9, or 10   Must file Form 1040
  1099-Q Qualified education program payments   Must file Form 1040
  1099-QA Distributions from ABLE accounts   Must file Form 1040
  1099-R Distributions from IRAs*   See the instructions for Form 1040A, lines 11a and 11b
    Distributions from pensions, annuities, etc.   See the instructions for Form 1040A, lines 12a and 12b
    Capital gain (box 3)   See the instructions on Form 1099-R
    Disability income with code 3 in box 7   See the instructions for Form 1040A, line 7
  1099-S Gross proceeds from real estate transactions (box 2) Must file Form 1040 if required to report the sale (see Pub. 523)
    Buyer's part of real estate tax (box 5)   Must file Form 1040
  1099-SA Distributions from HSAs and MSAs**   Must file Form 1040
  SSA-1099 Social security benefits   See the instructions for lines 14a and 14b
  RRB-1099 Railroad retirement benefits   See the instructions for lines 14a and 14b
  *This includes distributions from Roth, SEP, and SIMPLE IRAs.
  **This includes distributions from Archer and Medicare Advantage MSAs.

Who Can Use Form 1040A?

Introduction

You can use Form 1040A if all six of the following apply.

  1. You only had income from the following sources:

    1. Wages, salaries, tips.

    2. Interest and ordinary dividends.

    3. Capital gain distributions.

    4. Taxable scholarship and fellowship grants.

    5. Pensions, annuities, and IRAs.

    6. Unemployment compensation.

    7. Alaska Permanent Fund dividends.

    8. Taxable social security and railroad retirement benefits.

  2. The only adjustments to income you can claim are:

    1. Educator expenses.

    2. IRA deduction.

    3. Student loan interest deduction.

    4. Tuition and fees deduction.

  3. You don't itemize deductions.

  4. Your taxable income (line 27) is less than $100,000.

  5. The only tax credits you can claim are:

    1. Credit for child and dependent care expenses.

    2. Credit for the elderly or the disabled.

    3. Education credits.

    4. Retirement savings contributions credit.

    5. Child tax credit.

    6. Earned income credit.

    7. Additional child tax credit.

    8. Premium tax credit.

  6. You didn't have an alternative minimum tax adjustment on stock you acquired from the exercise of an incentive stock option (see Pub. 525).

You can also use Form 1040A if you received dependent care benefits or if you owe tax from the recapture of an education credit or the alternative minimum tax.

When Must You Use Form 1040?

Introduction

Check Where To Report Certain Items From 2015 Forms W-2, 1097, 1098, and 1099 to see if you must use Form 1040. You must also use Form 1040 if any of the following apply.

  1. You received any of the following types of income:

    1. Income from self-employment (business or farm income).

    2. Certain tips you didn't report to your employer. See the instructions for Form 1040A, line 7.

    3. Income received as a partner in a partnership, shareholder in an S corporation, or a beneficiary of an estate or trust.

    4. Dividends on insurance policies if they exceed the total of all net premiums you paid for the contract.

  2. You can exclude any of the following types of income:

    1. Foreign earned income you received as a U.S. citizen or resident alien.

    2. Certain income received from sources in Puerto Rico if you were a bona fide resident of Puerto Rico.

    3. Certain income received from sources in American Samoa if you were a bona fide resident of American Samoa for all of 2015.

  3. You have an alternative minimum tax adjustment on stock you acquired from the exercise of an incentive stock option (see Pub. 525).

  4. You received a distribution from a foreign trust.

  5. You owe the excise tax on insider stock compensation from an expatriated corporation.

  6. You owe household employment taxes. See Schedule H (Form 1040) and its instructions to find out if you owe these taxes.

  7. You are claiming the adoption credit or received employer-provided adoption benefits. See Form 8839 for details.

  8. You are an employee and your employer didn't withhold social security and Medicare tax. See Form 8919 for details.

  9. You had a qualified health savings account funding distribution from your IRA.

  10. You are a debtor in a bankruptcy case filed after October 16, 2005.

  11. You must repay the first-time homebuyer credit. See Form 5405 for details.

  12. You had foreign financial assets in 2015, and you must file Form 8938. See Form 8938 and its instructions.

  13. You owe Additional Medicare Tax or had Additional Medicare Tax withheld and must file Form 8959. See Form 8959 and its instructions.

  14. You owe Net Investment Income Tax and must file Form 8960. See Form 8960 and its instructions.

  15. You have adjusted gross income of more than $154,950 and must reduce the dollar amount of your exemptions. See the instructions for Form 1040.

  16. You received a Form W-2 that incorrectly includes in box 1 amounts that are payments under a Medicaid waiver program, and you can't get a corrected W-2, or you received a Form 1099-MISC that incorrectly reported these payments to the IRS.

  17. You are eligible for the health coverage tax credit. See Form 8885 for details.

Line Instructions for Form 1040A

Introduction

You may be eligible for free tax software that will take the guesswork out of preparing your return. Free File makes available free brand-name software and free e-file. Visit www.irs.gov/freefile for details.

Name and Address

Print or type the information in the spaces provided. If you are married filing a separate return, enter your spouse’s name on line 3 instead of below your name.

If you filed a joint return for 2014 and you are filing a joint return for 2015 with the same spouse, be sure to enter your names and SSNs in the same order as on your 2014 return.

Name Change

If you changed your name because of marriage, divorce, etc., be sure to report the change to your local Social Security Administration (SSA) office before filing your return. This prevents delays in processing your return and issuing refunds. It also safeguards your future social security benefits.

Address Change

If you plan to move after filing your return, use Form 8822 to notify the IRS of your new address.

P.O. Box

Enter your box number only if your post office doesn't deliver mail to your home.

Foreign Address

If you have a foreign address, enter the city name on the appropriate line. Don't enter any other information on that line, but also complete the spaces below that line. Don't abbreviate the country name. Follow the country's practice for entering the postal code and the name of the province, county, or state.

Death of a Taxpayer

See Death of a taxpayer under General Information, later.

Social Security Number (SSN)

An incorrect or missing SSN can increase your tax, reduce your refund, or delay your refund. To apply for an SSN, fill in Form SS-5 and return it, along with the appropriate evidence documents, to the Social Security Administration (SSA). You can get Form SS-5 online at www.socialsecurity.gov, from your local SSA office, or by calling the SSA at 1-800-772-1213. It usually takes about 2 weeks to get an SSN once the SSA has all the evidence and information it needs.

Check that both the name and SSN on your Forms 1040A, W-2, and 1099 agree with your social security card. If they don't, certain deductions and credits on your Form 1040A may be reduced or disallowed and you may not receive credit for your social security earnings. If your Form W-2 shows an incorrect SSN or name, notify your employer or the form-issuing agent as soon as possible to make sure your earnings are credited to your social security record. If the name or SSN on your social security card is incorrect, call the SSA.

IRS Individual Taxpayer Identification Numbers (ITINs) for Aliens

If you are a nonresident or resident alien and you don't have and aren't eligible to get an SSN, you must apply for an ITIN. For more information, see Form W-7 and its instructions. It takes about 7 weeks to get an ITIN.

If you already have an ITIN, enter it wherever your SSN is requested on your tax return.

An ITIN is for tax use only. It doesn't entitle you to social security benefits or change your employment or immigration status under U.S. law.

If you receive an SSN after previously using an ITIN, stop using your ITIN. Use your SSN instead. Visit a local IRS office or write a letter to the IRS explaining that you now have an SSN and want all your tax records combined under your SSN. Details about what to include with the letter and where to mail it are at www.irs.gov/Individuals/Additional-ITIN-Information.

Nonresident Alien Spouse

If your spouse is a nonresident alien, he or she must have either an SSN or an ITIN if:

  • You file a joint return,

  • You file a separate return and claim an exemption for your spouse, or

  • Your spouse is filing a separate return.

Presidential Election Campaign Fund

This fund helps pay for Presidential election campaigns. The fund reduces candidates' dependence on large contributions from individuals and groups and places candidates on an equal financial footing in the general election. The fund also helps pay for pediatric medical research. If you want $3 to go to this fund, check the box. If you are filing a joint return, your spouse can also have $3 go to the fund. If you check a box, your tax or refund won't change.

Filing Status

Check only the filing status that applies to you. The ones that will usually give you the lowest tax are listed last.

  • Married filing separately.

  • Single.

  • Head of household.

  • Married filing jointly.

  • Qualifying widow(er) with dependent child.

For information about marital status, see Pub. 501.

More than one filing status can apply to you. You can choose the one that will give you the lowest tax.

Line 1

Single

You can check the box on line 1 if any of the following was true on December 31, 2015.

  • You were never married.

  • You were legally separated according to your state law under a decree of divorce or separate maintenance. But if, at the end of 2015, your divorce wasn't final (an interlocutory decree), you are considered married and can't check the box on line 1.

  • You were widowed before January 1, 2015, and didn't remarry before the end of 2015. But, if you have a dependent child, you may be able to use the qualifying widow(er) filing status. See the instructions for line 5.

Line 2

Married Filing Jointly

You can check the box on line 2 if any of the following apply.

  • You were married at the end of 2015, even if you didn't live with your spouse at the end of 2015.

  • Your spouse died in 2015 and you didn't remarry in 2015.

  • You were married at the end of 2015, and your spouse died in 2016 before filing a 2015 return.

A married couple filing jointly report their combined income and deduct their combined allowable expenses on one return. They can file a joint return even if only one had income or if they didn't live together all year. However, both persons must sign the return. Once you file a joint return, you can't choose to file separate returns for that year after the due date of the return.

Joint and several tax liability.   If you file a joint return, both you and your spouse are generally responsible for the tax and any interest or penalties due on the return. This means that if one spouse doesn't pay the tax due, the other may have to. Or, if one spouse doesn't report the correct tax, both spouses may be responsible for any additional taxes assessed by the IRS. You may want to file separately if:
  • You believe your spouse isn't reporting all of his or her income, or

  • You don't want to be responsible for any taxes due if your spouse doesn't have enough tax withheld or doesn't pay enough estimated tax.

  See the instructions for line 3. Also see Innocent spouse relief under General Information, later.

Nonresident aliens and dual-status aliens.   Generally, a married couple can't file a joint return if either spouse is a nonresident alien at any time during the year. However, if you were a nonresident alien or a dual-status alien and were married to a U.S. citizen or resident alien at the end of 2015, you can elect to be treated as a resident alien and file a joint return. See Pub. 519 for details.

Line 3

Married Filing Separately

If you are married and file a separate return, you generally report only your own income, exemptions, deductions, and credits. Generally, you are responsible only for the tax on your own income. Different rules apply to people in community property states; see Pub. 555.

However, you will usually pay more tax than if you use another filing status for which you qualify. Also, if you file a separate return, you can't take the student loan interest deduction, the tuition and fees deduction, the education credits, or the earned income credit. You also can't take the standard deduction if your spouse itemizes deductions.

Be sure to enter your spouse's SSN or ITIN on Form 1040A. If your spouse doesn't have and isn't required to have an SSN or ITIN, enter "NRA."

You may be able to file as head of household if you had a child living with you and you lived apart from your spouse during the last 6 months of 2015. See Married persons who live apart, later.

Line 4

Head of Household

This filing status is for unmarried individuals who provide a home for certain other persons. You are considered unmarried for this purpose if any of the following applies.

  • You were legally separated according to your state law under a decree of divorce or separate maintenance at the end of 2015. But, if at the end of 2015, your divorce wasn't final (an interlocutory decree), you are considered married.

  • You are married but lived apart from your spouse for the last 6 months of 2015 and you meet the other rules under Married persons who live apart, later.

  • You are married to a nonresident alien at any time during the year and you don't choose to treat him or her as a resident alien.

Check the box on line 4 only if you are unmarried (or considered unmarried) and either Test 1 or Test 2 applies.

Test 1.   You paid over half the cost of keeping up a home that was the main home for all of 2015 of your parent whom you can claim as a dependent on line 6c, except under a multiple support agreement (see the line 6c instructions). Your parent didn't have to live with you.

Test 2.   You paid over half the cost of keeping up a home in which you lived and in which one of the following also lived for more than half of the year (if half or less, see Exception to time lived with you).
  1. Any person whom you can claim as a dependent on line 6c. But don't include:

    1. Your child whom you claim as your dependent because of the rule for Children of divorced or separated parents in the line 6c instructions,

    2. Any person who is your dependent only because he or she lived with you for all of 2015, or

    3. Any person you claimed as a dependent under a multiple support agreement. See the line 6c instructions.

  2. Your unmarried qualifying child who isn't your dependent.

  3. Your married qualifying child who isn't your dependent only because you can be claimed as a dependent on line 6c of someone else's 2015 return.

  4. Your qualifying child who, even though you are the custodial parent, isn't your dependent because of the rule for Children of divorced or separated parents in the line 6c instructions.

  If the child isn't claimed as your dependent on line 6c, enter the child's name on line 4. If you don't enter the name, it will take us longer to process your return.

Qualifying child.    To find out if someone is your qualifying child, see Step 1 of the line 6c instructions.

Dependent.   To find out if someone is your dependent, see the instructions for line 6c.

Exception to time lived with you.   Temporary absences by you or the other person for special circumstances, such as school, vacation, business, medical care, military service, or detention in a juvenile facility, count as time lived in the home. Also see Kidnapped child in the line 6c instructions, if applicable.

  If the person for whom you kept up a home was born or died in 2015, you still may be able to file as head of household. If the person is your qualifying child, the child must have lived with you for more than half the part of the year he or she was alive. If the person is anyone else, see Pub. 501.

Keeping up a home.   To find out what is included in the cost of keeping up a home, see Pub. 501.

  If you used payments you received under Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or other public assistance programs to pay part of the cost of keeping up your home, you can't count them as money you paid. However, you must include them in the total cost of keeping up your home to figure if you paid over half the cost.

Married persons who live apart.   Even if you weren't divorced or legally separated at the end of 2015, you are considered unmarried if all of the following apply.
  • You lived apart from your spouse for the last 6 months of 2015. Temporary absences for special circumstances, such as for business, medical care, school, or military service, count as time lived in the home.

  • You file a separate return from your spouse.

  • You paid over half the cost of keeping up your home for 2015.

  • Your home was the main home of your child, stepchild, or foster child for more than half of 2015 (if half or less, see Exception to time lived with you, earlier).

  • You can claim this child as your dependent or could claim the child except that the child's other parent can claim him or her under the rule for Children of divorced or separated parents in the line 6c instructions.

Adopted child.

An adopted child is always treated as your own child. An adopted child includes a child lawfully placed with you for legal adoption.

Foster child.

A foster child is any child placed with you by an authorized placement agency or by judgment, decree, or other order of any court of competent jurisdiction.

Line 5

Qualifying Widow(er) With Dependent Child

You can check the box on line 5 and use joint return tax rates for 2015 if all of the following apply.

  1. Your spouse died in 2013 or 2014 and you didn't remarry before the end of 2015.

  2. You have a child or stepchild you can claim as a dependent on line 6c. This doesn't include a foster child.

  3. This child lived in your home for all of 2015. If the child didn't live with you for the required time, see Exception to time lived with you, later.

  4. You paid over half the cost of keeping up your home.

  5. You could have filed a joint return with your spouse the year he or she died, even if you didn't actually do so.

If your spouse died in 2015, you can't file as qualifying widow(er) with dependent child. Instead, see the instructions for line 2.

Adopted child.   An adopted child is always treated as your own child. An adopted child includes a child lawfully placed with you for legal adoption.

Dependent.   To find out if someone is your dependent, see the instructions for line 6c.

Exception to time lived with you.   Temporary absences by you or the child for special circumstances, such as school, vacation, business, medical care, military service, or detention in a juvenile facility, count as time lived in the home. Also see Kidnapped child in the line 6c instructions, if applicable.

  A child is considered to have lived with you for all of 2015 if the child was born or died in 2015 and your home was the child's home for the entire time he or she was alive.

Keeping up a home.   To find out what is included in the cost of keeping up a home, see Pub. 501.

  If you used payments you received under Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or other public assistance programs to pay part of the cost of keeping up your home, you can't count them as money you paid. However, you must include them in the total cost of keeping up your home to figure if you paid over half the cost.

Exemptions

You can deduct $4,000 on line 26 for each exemption you can take.

Line 6b

Spouse

Check the box on line 6b if either of the following applies.

  1. Your filing status is married filing jointly and your spouse can't be claimed as a dependent on another person's return.

  2. You were married at the end of 2015, your filing status is married filing separately or head of household, and both of the following apply.

    1. Your spouse had no income and isn't filing a return.

    2. Your spouse can't be claimed as a dependent on another person's return.

If your filing status is head of household and you check the box on line 6b, enter the name of your spouse on the line next to line 6b. Also, enter your spouse's social security number in the space provided at the top of your return. If you became divorced or legally separated during 2015, you can't take an exemption for your former spouse.

Death of your spouse.   If your spouse died in 2015 and you didn't remarry by the end of 2015, check the box on line 6b if you could have taken an exemption for your spouse on the date of death. For other filing instructions, see Death of a taxpayer under General Instructions, later.

Line 6c—Dependents

Dependents and Qualifying Child for Child Tax Credit

Follow the steps below to find out if a person qualifies as your dependent, qualifies you to take the child tax credit, or both. If you have more than six dependents, include a statement showing the information required in columns (1) through (4).

Step 1. Do You Have a Qualifying Child?

A qualifying child is a child who is your...
Son, daughter, stepchild, foster child, brother, sister, stepbrother, stepsister, half brother, half sister, or a descendant of any of them (for example, your grandchild, niece, or nephew),
was ...
Under age 19 at the end of 2015 and younger than you (or your spouse, if filing jointly)
or
Under age 24 at the end of 2015, a student (defined later), and younger than you (or your spouse, if filing jointly)
or
Any age and permanently and totally disabled (defined later)
Who didn't provide over half of his or her own support for 2015 (see Pub. 501)
Who isn't filing a joint return for 2015 or is filing a joint return for 2015 only to claim a refund of withheld income tax or estimated tax paid (see Pub. 501 for details and examples)
Who lived with you for more than half of 2015. If the child didn't live with you for the required time, see Exception to time lived with you, later.
If the child meets the conditions to be a qualifying child of any other person (other than your spouse if filing jointly) for 2015, see Qualifying child of more than one person, later.

1. Do you have a child who meets the conditions to be your qualifying child?

 [ ]
Yes.

Go to Step 2.

 [ ]
No.

Go to Step 4.

Step 2. Is Your Qualifying Child Your Dependent?

1. Was the child a U.S. citizen, U.S. national, U.S. resident alien, or a resident of Canada or Mexico? (See Pub. 519 for the definition of a U.S. national or U.S. resident alien. If the child was adopted, see Exception to citizen test, later.)

 [ ]
Yes.

 [ ]
No.

You can't claim this child as a dependent.

2. Was the child married?

 [ ]
Yes.

See Married person, later.

 [ ]
No.

3. Could you, or your spouse if filing jointly, be claimed as a dependent on someone else's 2015 tax return? See Steps 1, 2, and 4.

 [ ]
Yes.

You can't claim any dependents. Go to Form 1040A, line 7.

 [ ]
No.

You can claim this child as a dependent. Complete Form 1040A, line 6c, columns (1) through (3) for this child.  
Then, go to Step 3.

Step 3. Does Your Qualifying ChildQualify You for the Child Tax Credit?

1. Was the child under age 17 at the end of 2015?

 [ ]
Yes.

 [ ]
No.

This child isn't a qualifying child for the child tax credit.

2. Was the child a U.S. citizen, U.S. national, or U.S. resident alien? (See Pub. 519 for the definition of a U.S. national or U.S. resident alien. If the child was adopted, see Exception to citizen test, later.)

 [ ]
Yes.

This child is a qualifying child for the child tax credit. Check the box on Form 1040A, line 6c, column (4).

 [ ]
No.

This child isn't a qualifying child for the child tax credit.

Step 4. Is Your Qualifying Relative Your Dependent?

A qualifying relative is a person who is your...
Son, daughter, stepchild, foster child, or a descendant of any of them (for example, your grandchild)
or
Brother, sister, half brother, half sister, or a son or daughter of any of them (for example, your niece or nephew)
or
Father, mother, or an ancestor or sibling of either of them (for example, your grandmother, grandfather, aunt, or uncle)
or
Stepbrother, stepsister, stepfather, stepmother, son-in-law, daughter-in-law, father-in-law, mother-in-law, brother-in-law, or sister-in-law
or
Any other person (other than your spouse) who lived with you all year as a member of your household if your relationship didn't violate local law. If the person didn't live with you for the required time, see Exception to time lived with you, later
who wasn't...
A qualifying child (see Step 1) of any taxpayer for 2015. For this purpose, a person isn't a taxpayer if he or she isn't required to file a U.S. income tax return and either doesn't file such a return or files only to get a refund of withheld income tax or estimated tax paid. See Pub. 501 for details and examples
who...
Had gross income of less than $4,000 in 2015. If the person was permanently and totally disabled, see Exception to gross income test, later
For whom you provided...
Over half of his or her support in 2015. But see Children of divorced or separated parents, Multiple support agreements, and Kidnapped child, later.

1. Does any person meet the conditions to be your qualifying relative?

 [ ]
Yes.

 [ ]
No.

Go to Form 1040A, line 7.

2. Was your qualifying relative a U.S. citizen, U.S. national, U.S. resident alien, or a resident of Canada or Mexico? (See Pub. 519 for the definition of a U.S. national or U.S. resident alien. If your qualifying relative was adopted, see Exception to citizen test, later.)

 [ ]
Yes.

 [ ]
No.

You can't claim this person as a dependent.

3. Was your qualifying relative married?

 [ ]
Yes.

See Married person, later.

 [ ]
No.

4. Could you, or your spouse if filing jointly, be claimed as a dependent on someone else's 2015 tax return? See Steps 1, 2, and 4.

 [ ]
Yes.

You can't claim any dependents. Go to Form 1040A, line 7.

 [ ]
No.

You can claim this person as a dependent. Complete Form 1040A, line 6c, columns (1) through (3). Don't check the box on Form 1040A, line 6c, column (4).

Definitions and Special Rules

Adopted child.   An adopted child is always treated as your own child. An adopted child includes a child lawfully placed with you for legal adoption.

Adoption taxpayer identification numbers (ATINs).   If you have a dependent who was placed with you for legal adoption and you don't know his or her SSN, you must get an ATIN for the dependent from the IRS. See Form W-7A for details. If the dependant isn't a U.S. citizen or resident alien, apply for an ITIN instead, using Form W-7.

  If you didn't have an SSN (or ITIN) by the due date of your 2015 return (including extensions), you can't claim the child tax credit on either your original or an amended 2015 return, even if you later get an SSN (or ITIN). Also, no child tax credit is allowed on your original or an amended 2015 return with respect to a child who didn't have an ATIN or ITIN by the due date of your return (including extensions), even if that child later gets one of those numbers. See the instructions for line 35.

Children of divorced or separated parents.   A child will be treated as the qualifying child or qualifying relative of his or her noncustodial parent (defined later) if all of the following conditions apply.
  1. The parents are divorced, legally separated, separated under a written separation agreement, or lived apart at all times during the last 6 months of 2015 (whether or not they are or were married).

  2. The child received over half of his or her support for 2015 from the parents (and the rules on Multiple support agreements, later, don't apply). Support of a child received from a parent's spouse is treated as provided by the parent.

  3. The child is in custody of one or both of the parents for more than half of 2015.

  4. Either of the following applies.

    1. The custodial parent signs Form 8332 or a substantially similar statement that he or she won't claim the child as a dependent for 2015, and the noncustodial parent includes a copy of the form or statement with his or her return. If the divorce decree or separation agreement went into effect after 1984 and before 2009, the noncustodial parent may be able to attach certain pages from the decree or agreement instead of Form 8332. See Post-1984 and pre-2009 decree or agreement and Post-2008 decree or agreement, later.

    2. A pre-1985 decree of divorce or separate maintenance or written separation agreement between the parents provides that the noncustodial parent can claim the child as a dependent, and the noncustodial parent provides at least $600 for support of the child during 2015.

  If conditions (1) through (4) apply, only the noncustodial parent can claim the child for purposes of the dependency exemption (line 6c) and the child tax credits (lines 35 and 43). However, this doesn't allow the noncustodial parent to claim head of household filing status, the credit for child and dependent care expenses, the exclusion for dependent care benefits, the earned income credit, or the health coverage tax credit. See Pub. 501 for details.

Example.

Even if conditions (1) through (4) are met and the custodial parent signs Form 8332 or a substantially similar statement that he or she will not claim the child as a dependent for 2015, this doesn't allow the noncustodial parent to claim the child as a qualifying child for the earned income credit. The custodial parent or another taxpayer, if eligible, can claim the child for the earned income credit.

Custodial and noncustodial parents.

The custodial parent is the parent with whom the child lived for the greater number of nights in 2015. The noncustodial parent is the other parent. If the child was with each parent for an equal number of nights, the custodial parent is the parent with the higher adjusted gross income. See Pub. 501 for an exception for a parent who works at night, rules for a child who is emancipated under state law, and other details.

Post-1984 and pre-2009 decree or agreement.

The decree or agreement must state all three of the following.

  1. The noncustodial parent can claim the child as a dependent without regard to any condition, such as payment of support.

  2. The other parent won't claim the child as a dependent.

  3. The years for which the claim is released.

The noncustodial parent must include all of the following pages from the decree or agreement.

  • Cover page (include the other parent's SSN on that page).

  • The pages that include all the information identified in (1) through (3) above.

  • Signature page with the other parent's signature and date of agreement.

You must include the required information even if you filed it with your return in an earlier year.

Post-2008 decree or agreement.

If the divorce decree or separation agreement went into effect after 2008, the noncustodial parent can't include pages from the decree or agreement instead of Form 8332. The custodial parent must sign either Form 8332 or a substantially similar statement the only purpose of which is to release the custodial parent's claim to an exemption for a child, and the noncustodial parent must include a copy with his or her return. The form or statement must release the custodial parent's claim to the child without any conditions. For example, the release must not depend on the noncustodial parent paying support.

Release of exemption revoked.

A custodial parent who has revoked his or her previous release of a claim to exemption for a child must include a copy of the revocation with his or her return. For details, see Form 8332.

Exception to citizen test.   If you are a U.S. citizen or U.S. national and your adopted child lived with you all year as a member of your household, that child meets the requirement to be a U.S. citizen in Step 2, question 1; Step 3, question 2; and Step 4, question 2.

Exception to gross income test.   If your relative (including a person who lived with you all year as a member of your household) is permanently and totally disabled (defined later), certain income for services performed at a sheltered workshop may be excluded for this test. For details, see Pub. 501.

Exception to time lived with you.   Temporary absences by you or the other person for special circumstances, such as school, vacation, business, medical care, military service, or detention in a juvenile facility, count as time the person lived with you. Also see Children of divorced or separated parents, earlier, or Kidnapped child.

  If the person meets all other requirements to be your qualifying child but was born or died in 2015, the person is considered to have lived with you for more than half of 2015 if your home was this person's home for more than half the time he or she was alive in 2015.

  Any other person is considered to have lived with you for all of 2015 if the person was born or died in 2015 and your home was this person's home for the entire time he or she was alive in 2015.

Foster child.   A foster child is any child placed with you by an authorized placement agency or by judgment, decree, or other order of any court of competent jurisdiction.

Kidnapped child.   If your child is presumed by law enforcement authorities to have been kidnapped by someone who isn't a family member, you may be able to take the child into account in determining your eligibility for head of household or qualifying widow(er) filing status, the dependency exemption, the child tax credit, and the earned income credit (EIC). For details, see Pub. 501 (Pub. 596 for the EIC).

Married person.   If the person is married and files a joint return, you can't claim that person as your dependent. However, if the person is married but doesn't file a joint return or files a joint return only to claim a refund of withheld income tax or estimated tax paid, you may be able to claim him or her as a dependent. (See Pub. 501 for details and examples.) In that case, go to Step 2, question 3 (for a qualifying child) or Step 4, question 4 (for a qualifying relative).

Multiple support agreements.   If no one person contributed over half of the support of your relative (or a person who lived with you all year as a member of your household) but you and another person(s) provided more than half of your relative's support, special rules may apply that would treat you as having provided over half of the support. For details, see Pub. 501.

Permanently and totally disabled.   A person is permanently and totally disabled if, at any time in 2015, the person can't engage in any substantial gainful activity because of a physical or mental condition and a doctor has determined that this condition has lasted or can be expected to last continuously for at least a year or can be expected to lead to death.

Qualifying child of more than one person.   Even if a child meets the conditions to be the qualifying child of more than one person, only one person can claim the child as a qualifying child for all of the following tax benefits, unless the special rule for Children of divorced or separated parents, described earlier, applies.
  1. Dependency exemption (line 6c).

  2. Child tax credits (lines 35 and 43).

  3. Head of household filing status (line 4).

  4. Credit for child and dependent care expenses (line 31).

  5. Exclusion for dependent care benefits (Form 2441, Part III).

  6. Earned income credit (lines 42a and 42b).

No other person can take any of the six tax benefits listed above unless he or she has a different qualifying child. If you and any other person can claim the child as a qualifying child, the following rules apply.
  • If only one of the persons is the child's parent, the child is treated as the qualifying child of the parent.

  • If the parents file a joint return together and can claim the child as a qualifying child, the child is treated as the qualifying child of the parents.

  • If the parents don't file a joint return together but both parents claim the child as a qualifying child, the IRS will treat the child as the qualifying child of the parent with whom the child lived for the longer period of time in 2015. If the child lived with each parent for the same amount of time, the IRS will treat the child as the qualifying child of the parent who had the higher adjusted gross income (AGI) for 2015.

  • If no parent can claim the child as a qualifying child, the child is treated as the qualifying child of the person who had the highest AGI for 2015.

  • If a parent can claim the child as a qualifying child but no parent does so claim the child, the child is treated as the qualifying child of the person who had the highest AGI for 2015, but only if that person's AGI is higher than the highest AGI of any parent of the child who can claim the child.

Example.

Your daughter meets the conditions to be a qualifying child for both you and your mother. Your daughter doesn't meet the conditions to be a qualifying child of any other person, including her other parent. Under the rules just described, you can claim your daughter as a qualifying child for all of the six tax benefits listed earlier for which you otherwise qualify. Your mother can't claim any of those six tax benefits unless she has a different qualifying child. However, if your mother's AGI is higher than yours and you don't claim your daughter as a qualifying child, your daughter is the qualifying child of your mother.

  For more details and examples, see Pub. 501.

  If you will be claiming the child as a qualifying child, go to Step 2. Otherwise, stop; you can't claim any benefits based on this child.

Social security number.   You must enter each dependent's social security number (SSN). Be sure the name and SSN entered agree with the dependent's social security card. Otherwise, at the time we process your return, we may disallow the exemption claimed for the dependent and reduce or disallow any other tax benefits (such as the child tax credit) based on that dependent. If the name or SSN on the dependent's social security card isn't correct, or you need to get an SSN for your dependent, contact the Social Security Administration. See Social Security Number (SSN), earlier. If your dependent won't have a number by the date your return is due, see What If You Can't File on Time? earlier.

  If your dependent child was born and died in 2015 and you don't have an SSN for the child, enter “Died” in column (2) and include a copy of the child's birth certificate, death certificate, or hospital records. The document must show the child was born alive.

  If you didn't have an SSN (or ITIN) by the due date of your 2015 return (including extensions), you can't claim the child tax credit on either your original or an amended 2015 return, even if you later get an SSN (or ITIN). Also, no child tax credit is allowed on your original or an amended 2015 return with respect to a child who didn't have an SSN, ATIN, or ITIN by the due date of your return (including extensions), even if that child later gets one of those numbers. See the instructions for line 35.

Student.   A student is a child who during any part of 5 calendar months of 2015 was enrolled as a full-time student at a school, or took a full-time, on-farm training course given by a school or a state, county, or local government agency. A school includes a technical, trade, or mechanical school. It doesn't include an on-the-job training course, correspondence school, or school offering courses only through the Internet.

Income

Generally, you must report all income except income that is exempt from tax by law. For details, see the following instructions, especially the instructions for lines 7 through 14b. Also see Pub. 525.

Foreign-Source Income

You must report unearned income, such as interest, dividends, and pensions, from sources outside the United States unless exempt by law or a tax treaty. You must also report earned income, such as wages and tips, from sources outside the United States.

If you worked abroad, you may be able to exclude part or all of your foreign earned income if you file Form 1040. For details, see Pub. 54 and Form 2555 or 2555-EZ.

Foreign retirement plans.   If you were a beneficiary of a foreign retirement plan, you may have to report the undistributed income earned in your plan. However, if you were the beneficiary of a Canadian registered retirement plan, see Revenue Procedure 2014-55, 2014-44 I.R.B. 753, available at www.irs.gov//irb/2014-44_IRB/ar10.html, to find out if you can elect to defer tax on the undistributed income. If you elect to defer tax, you must file Form 1040.

  Report distributions from foreign pension plans on lines 12a and 12b.

Foreign accounts and trusts.   You must complete Part III of Schedule B if you:
  • Had a foreign account, or

  • Received a distribution from, or were a grantor of, or a transferor to, a foreign trust.

Foreign financial assets.   If you had foreign financial assets in 2015, you may have to file Form 8938. If you must file Form 8938, you can't file Form 1040A. You must file Form 1040. See Form 8938 and its instructions.

Rounding Off to Whole Dollars

You can round off cents to whole dollars on your return and schedules. If you do round to whole dollars, you must round all amounts. To round, drop amounts under 50 cents and increase amounts from 50 to 99 cents to the next dollar. For example, $1.39 becomes $1 and $2.50 becomes $3.

If you have to add two or more amounts to figure the amount to enter on a line, include cents when adding the amounts and round off only the total.

Refunds of State or Local Income Taxes

If you received a refund, credit, or offset of state or local income taxes in 2015, you may receive a Form 1099-G.

For the year the tax was paid to the state or other taxing authority, did you itemize deductions?

No.
None of your refund is taxable.
Yes.
You may have to report part or all of the refund as income on Form 1040 for 2015. See Pub. 525 for details.

Community Property States

Community property states are Arizona, California, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. If you and your spouse lived in a community property state, you must usually follow state law to determine what is community income and what is separate income. For details, see Form 8958 and Pub. 555.

Nevada, Washington, and California domestic partners.   A registered domestic partner in Nevada, Washington, or California generally must report half the combined community income of the individual and his or her domestic partner. See Form 8958 and see Pub. 555.

Line 7

Wages, Salaries, Tips, etc.

Enter the total of your wages, salaries, tips, etc. If a joint return, also include your spouse's income. For most people, the amount to enter on this line should be shown in box 1 of their Form(s) W-2. But the following types of income must also be included in the total on line 7.

  • All wages received as a household employee for which you didn't receive a Form W-2 because your employer paid you less than $1,900 in 2015. Also, enter “HSH” and the amount not reported on a Form W-2 in the space to the left of line 7.

  • Tip income you didn't report to your employer. But you must use Form 1040 and Form 4137 if you received tips of $20 or more in any month and didn't report the full amount to your employer, or your Form(s) W-2 shows allocated tips that you must report as income. You must report the allocated tips shown on your Form(s) W-2 unless you can prove that you received less. Allocated tips should be shown in box 8 of your Form(s) W-2. They aren't included as income in box 1. See Pub. 531 for more details.

  • Dependent care benefits, which should be shown in box 10 of your Form(s) W-2. But first complete Form 2441 to see if you can exclude part or all of the benefits.

  • Scholarship and fellowship grants not reported on Form W-2. Also, enter “SCH” and the amount in the space to the left of line 7. However, if you were a degree candidate, include on line 7 only the amounts you used for expenses other than tuition and course-related expenses. For example, amounts used for room, board, and travel must be reported on line 7.

  • Disability pensions shown on Form 1099-R if you haven't reached the minimum retirement age set by your employer. But see Insurance premiums for retired public safety officers, in the instructions for lines 12a and 12b. Disability pensions received after you reach minimum retirement age and other payments shown on Form 1099-R (other than payments from an IRA*) are reported on lines 12a and 12b of Form 1040A. Payments from an IRA are reported on lines 11a and 11b.

    * This includes a Roth, SEP, or SIMPLE IRA.

Missing or Incorrect Form W-2?

Your employer is required to provide or send Form W-2 to you no later than February 1, 2016. If you do not receive it by early February, use Tax Topic 154 to find out what to do. Even if you don't get a Form W-2, you must still report your earnings on line 7. If you lose your Form W-2 or it is incorrect, ask your employer for a new one.

Line 8a

Taxable Interest

Each payer should send you a Form 1099-INT or Form 1099-OID. Enter your total taxable interest income on line 8a. But you must fill in and attach Schedule B if the total is over $1,500 or any of the other conditions listed at the beginning of the Schedule B instructions apply to you.

For more details about reporting taxable interest, including market discount on bonds, see Pub. 550.

Interest credited in 2015 on deposits that you couldn't withdraw because of the bankruptcy or insolvency of the financial institution may not have to be included in your 2015 income. For details, see Pub. 550.

If you get a 2015 Form 1099-INT for U.S. savings bond interest that includes amounts you reported before 2015, see Pub. 550.

Line 8b

Tax-Exempt Interest

If you received any tax-exempt interest, such as from municipal bonds, each payer should send you a Form 1099-INT. Your tax-exempt interest should be shown in box 8 of Form 1099-INT. Enter the total on line 8b. Also include on line 8b any exempt-interest dividends from a mutual fund or other regulated investment company. This amount should be shown in box 10 of Form 1099-DIV.

Don't include interest earned on your IRA, health savings account, Archer or Medicare Advantage MSA, or Coverdell education savings account.

If you received tax-exempt interest from private activity bonds issued after August 7, 1986, you must use Form 1040.

Line 9a

Ordinary Dividends

Each payer should send you a Form 1099-DIV. Enter your total ordinary dividends on line 9a. This amount should be shown in box 1a of Form(s) 1099-DIV.

You must fill in and attach Schedule B if the total is over $1,500 or you received, as a nominee, ordinary dividends that actually belong to someone else.

You must use Form 1040 if you received nondividend distributions (box 3 of Form 1099-DIV) required to be reported as capital gains.

For details, see Pub. 550.

Line 9b

Qualified Dividends

Enter your total qualified dividends on line 9b. Qualified dividends are also included in the ordinary dividend total required to be shown on line 9a. Qualified dividends are eligible for a lower tax rate than other ordinary income. Generally, these dividends are shown in box 1b of Form(s) 1099-DIV. See Pub. 550 for the definition of qualified dividends if you received dividends not reported on Form 1099-DIV.

Exception.   Some dividends may be reported as qualified dividends in box 1b of Form 1099-DIV but aren't qualified dividends. These include:
  • Dividends you received as a nominee. See the Schedule B instructions.

  • Dividends you received on any share of stock that you held for less than 61 days during the 121-day period that began 60 days before the ex-dividend date. The ex-dividend date is the first date following the declaration of a dividend on which the purchaser of a stock isn't entitled to receive the next dividend payment. When counting the number of days you held the stock, include the day you disposed of the stock but not the day you acquired it. See the examples that follow. Also, when counting the number of days you held the stock, you can't count certain days during which your risk of loss was diminished. See Pub. 550 for more details.

  • Dividends attributable to periods totaling more than 366 days that you received on any share of preferred stock held for less than 91 days during the 181-day period that began 90 days before the ex-dividend date. When counting the number of days you held the stock, you can't count certain days during which your risk of loss was diminished. See Pub. 550 for more details. Preferred dividends attributable to periods totaling less than 367 days are subject to the 61-day holding period rule just described.

  • Dividends on any share of stock to the extent that you are under an obligation (including a short sale) to make related payments with respect to positions in substantially similar or related property.

  • Payments in lieu of dividends, but only if you know or have reason to know that the payments aren't qualified dividends.

Example 1.

You bought 5,000 shares of XYZ Corp. common stock on July 8, 2015. XYZ Corp. paid a cash dividend of 10 cents per share. The ex-dividend date was July 16, 2015. Your Form 1099-DIV from XYZ Corp. shows $500 in box 1a (ordinary dividends) and in box 1b (qualified dividends). However, you sold the 5,000 shares on August 11, 2015. You held your shares of XYZ Corp. for only 34 days of the 121-day period (from July 9, 2015, through August 11, 2015). The 121-day period began on May 17, 2015, (60 days before the ex-dividend date) and ended on September 14, 2015. You have no qualified dividends from XYZ Corp. because you held the XYZ stock for less than 61 days.

Example 2.

The facts are the same as in Example 1 except that you bought the stock on July 15, 2015 (the day before the ex-dividend date), and you sold the stock on September 16, 2015. You held the stock for 63 days (from July 15, 2015, through September 16, 2015). The $500 of qualified dividends shown in box 1b of your Form 1099-DIV are all qualified dividends because you held the stock for 61 days of the 121-day period (from July 16, 2015, through September 14, 2015).

Example 3.

You bought 10,000 shares of ABC Mutual Fund common stock on July 8, 2015. ABC Mutual Fund paid a cash dividend of 10 cents a share. The ex-dividend date was July 16, 2015. The ABC Mutual Fund advises you that the part of the dividend eligible to be treated as qualified dividends equals 2 cents a share. Your Form 1099-DIV from ABC Mutual Fund shows total ordinary dividends of $1,000, and qualified dividends of $200. However, you sold the 10,000 shares on August 11, 2015. You have no qualified dividends from ABC Mutual Fund because you held the ABC Mutual Fund stock for less than 61 days.

Be sure you use the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet to figure your tax.

Line 10

Capital Gain Distributions

Each payer should send you a Form 1099-DIV. Do any of the Forms 1099-DIV or substitute statements you, or your spouse if filing a joint return, received have an amount in box 2b (unrecaptured section 1250 gain), box 2c (section 1202 gain), or box 2d (collectibles (28%) gain)?

Yes.
You must use Form 1040.
No.
You can use Form 1040A. Enter your total capital gain distributions (from box 2a of Form(s) 1099-DIV) on line 10. Also, be sure you use the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet to figure your tax.

If you received capital gain distributions as a nominee (that is, they were paid to you but actually belong to someone else), report on line 10 only the amount that belongs to you. Include a statement showing the full amount you received and the amount you received as a nominee. See the Schedule B instructions for filing requirements for Forms 1099-DIV and 1096.

Lines 11a and 11b

IRA Distributions

You should receive a Form 1099-R showing the total amount of any distribution from your IRA before income tax and other deductions were withheld. This amount should be shown in box 1 of Form 1099-R. Unless otherwise noted in the line 11a and 11b instructions, an IRA includes a traditional IRA, Roth IRA (including a myRA), simplified employee pension (SEP) IRA, and a savings incentive match plan for employees (SIMPLE) IRA. Except as provided below, leave line 11a blank and enter the total distribution (from Form 1099-R, box 1) on line 11b.

Exception 1.   Enter the total distribution on line 11a if you rolled over part or all of the distribution from one:
  • IRA to another IRA of the same type (for example, from one traditional IRA to another traditional IRA),

  • SEP or SIMPLE IRA to a traditional IRA, or

  • IRA to a qualified plan other than an IRA.

  Also, enter “Rollover” next to line 11b. If the total distribution was rolled over in a qualified rollover, enter -0- on line 11b. If the total distribution wasn't rolled over in a qualified rollover, enter the part not rolled over on line 11b unless Exception 2 applies to the part not rolled over. Generally, a qualified rollover must be made within 60 days after the day you received the distribution. For more details on rollovers, see Pub. 590-A and Pub. 590-B.

  If you rolled over the distribution into a qualified plan other than an IRA or you made the rollover in 2016, include a statement explaining what you did.

Exception 2.   If any of the following apply, enter the total distribution on line 11a and see Form 8606 and its instructions to figure the amount to enter on line 11b.
  1. You received a distribution from an IRA (other than a Roth IRA) and you made nondeductible contributions to any of your traditional or SEP IRAs for 2015 or an earlier year. If you made nondeductible contributions to these IRAs for 2015, also seePub. 590-A and Pub. 590-B.

  2. You received a distribution from a Roth IRA. But if either (a) or (b) below applies, enter -0- on line 11b; you don't have to see Form 8606 or its instructions.

    1. Distribution code T is shown in box 7 of Form 1099-R and you made a contribution (including a conversion) to a Roth IRA for 2010 or an earlier year.

    2. Distribution code Q is shown in box 7 of Form 1099-R.

  3. You converted part or all of a traditional, SEP, or SIMPLE IRA to a Roth IRA in 2015.

  4. You had a 2014 or 2015 IRA contribution returned to you, with the related earnings or less any loss, by the due date (including extensions) of your tax return for that year.

  5. You made excess contributions to your IRA for an earlier year and had them returned to you in 2015.

  6. You recharacterized part or all of a contribution to a Roth IRA as a traditional IRA contribution, or vice versa.

Exception 3.   If the distribution is a qualified charitable distribution (QCD), enter the total distribution on line 11a. If the total amount distributed is a QCD, enter -0- on line 11b. If only part of the distribution is a QCD, enter the part that isn't a QCD on line 11b unless Exception 2 applies to that part. Enter “QCD” next to line 11b.

  A QCD is a distribution made directly by the trustee of your IRA (other than an ongoing SEP or SIMPLE IRA) to an organization eligible to receive tax-deductible contributions (with certain exceptions). You must have been at least age 70½ when the distribution was made.

  Generally, your total QCDs for the year can't be more than $100,000. (On a joint return, your spouse can also have a QCD of up to $100,000.) The amount of the QCD is limited to the amount that would otherwise be included in your income. If your IRA includes nondeductible contributions, the distribution is first considered to be paid out of otherwise taxable income. See Pub. 590-A for details.

  
You can't claim a charitable contribution deduction for any QCD not included in your income.

Exception 4.   If the distribution is a health savings account (HSA) funding distribution (HFD), you must file Form 1040. See Exception 4 in the instructions for Form 1040, lines 15a and 15b. An HFD is a distribution made directly by the trustee of your IRA (other than an ongoing SEP or SIMPLE IRA) to your HSA.

More than one exception applies.   If more than one exception applies, include a statement showing the amount of each exception, instead of making an entry next to line 11b. For example: “Line 11b--$1,000 Rollover and $500 Distribution.” But you don't need to attach a statement if only Exception 2 and one other exception apply.

More than one distribution.   If you (or your spouse if filing jointly) received more than one distribution, figure the taxable amount of each distribution and enter the total of the taxable amounts on line 11b. Enter the total amount of those distributions on line 11a.

You may have to pay an additional tax if (a) you received an early distribution from your IRA and the total wasn't rolled over or (b) you were born before July 1, 1944, and received less than the minimum required distribution from your traditional, SEP, and SIMPLE IRAs. If you do owe this tax, you must use Form 1040.

More information.    For more information about IRAs, see Pub. 590-A and Pub. 590-B.

Lines 12a and 12b

Pensions and Annuities

You should receive a Form 1099-R showing the total amount of your pension and annuity payments before income tax or other deductions were withheld. This amount should be shown in box 1 of Form 1099-R. Pension and annuity payments include distributions from 401(k), 403(b), and governmental 457(b) plans. Rollovers and lump-sum distributions are explained later. Don't include the following payments on lines 12a and 12b. Instead, report them on line 7.

  • Disability pensions received before you reach the minimum retirement age set by your employer.

  • Corrective distributions (including any earnings) of excess salary deferrals or excess contributions to retirement plans. The plan must advise you of the year(s) the distributions are includible in income.

Attach Form(s) 1099-R to Form 1040A if any federal income tax was withheld.

Fully taxable pensions and annuities.   Your payments are fully taxable if (a) you didn't contribute to the cost (see Cost, later) of your pension or annuity, or (b) you got back your entire cost tax free before 2015. But see Insurance premiums for retired public safety officers, later. If your pension or annuity is fully taxable, enter the total pension or annuity payments (from Form(s) 1099-R, box 1) on line 12b; don't make an entry on line 12a.

  Fully taxable pensions and annuities also include military retirement pay shown on Form 1099-R. For details on military disability pensions, see Pub. 525. If you received a Form RRB-1099-R, see Pub. 575 to find out how to report your benefits.

Partially taxable pensions and annuities.   Enter the total pension or annuity payments (from Form 1099-R, box 1) on line 12a. If your Form 1099-R doesn't show the taxable amount, you must use the General Rule explained in Pub. 939 to figure the taxable part to enter on line 12b. But if your annuity starting date (defined later) was after July 1, 1986, see Simplified Method, later, to find out if you must use that method to figure the taxable part.

  You can ask the IRS to figure the taxable part for you for a $1,000 fee. For details, see Pub. 939.

  If your Form 1099-R shows a taxable amount, you can report that amount on line 12b. But you may be able to report a lower taxable amount by using the General Rule or the Simplified Method or if the exclusion for retired public safety officers, discussed next, applies.

Insurance premiums for retired public safety officers.   If you are an eligible retired public safety officer (law enforcement officer, firefighter, chaplain, or member of a rescue squad or ambulance crew), you can elect to exclude from income distributions made from your eligible retirement plan that are used to pay the premiums for coverage by an accident or health plan or a long-term care insurance contract. You can do this only if you retired because of disability or because you reached normal retirement age. The premiums can be for coverage for you, your spouse, or dependents. The distribution must be from a plan maintained by the employer from which you retired as a public safety officer. Also, the distribution must be made directly from the plan to the provider of the accident or health plan or long-term care insurance contract. You can exclude from income the smaller of the amount of the premiums or $3,000. You can only make this election for amounts that would otherwise be included in your income.

  An eligible retirement plan is a governmental plan that is:
  • a qualified trust,

  • a section 403(a) plan,

  • a section 403(b) plan, or

  • a section 457(b) plan.

  If you make this election, reduce the otherwise taxable amount of your pension or annuity by the amount excluded. The amount shown in box 2a of Form 1099-R doesn't reflect the exclusion. Report your total distributions on line 12a and the taxable amount on line 12b. Enter “PSO” next to line 12b.

  If you are retired on disability and reporting your disability pension on line 7, include only the taxable amount on that line and enter “PSO” and the amount excluded in the space to the left of line 7.

Simplified Method.   You must use the Simplified Method if either of the following applies.
  1. Your annuity starting date was after July 1, 1986, and you used this method last year to figure the taxable part.

  2. Your annuity starting date was after November 18, 1996, and both of the following apply.

    1. The payments are from a qualified employee plan, a qualified employee annuity, or a tax-sheltered annuity.

    2. On your annuity starting date, either you were under age 75 or the number of years of guaranteed payments was fewer than 5. See Pub. 575 for the definition of guaranteed payments.

  If you must use the Simplified Method, complete the Simplified Method Worksheet in these instructions to figure the taxable part of your pension or annuity. For more details on the Simplified Method, see Pub. 575 or Pub. 721 for U.S. Civil Service retirement benefits.

If you received U.S. Civil Service retirement benefits and you chose the alternative annuity option, see Pub. 721 to figure the taxable part of your annuity. Don't use the Simplified Method Worksheet in these instructions.

Annuity starting date.   Your annuity starting date is the later of the first day of the first period for which you received a payment or the date the plan's obligations became fixed.

Age (or combined ages) at annuity starting date.   If you are the retiree, use your age on the annuity starting date. If you are the survivor of a retiree, use the retiree's age on his or her annuity starting date. But if your annuity starting date was after 1997 and the payments are for your life and that of your beneficiary, use your combined ages on the annuity starting date.

  If you are the beneficiary of an employee who died, see Pub. 575. If there is more than one beneficiary, see Pub. 575 or Pub. 721 to figure each beneficiary's taxable amount.

Cost.   Your cost is generally your net investment in the plan as of the annuity starting date. It doesn't include pre-tax contributions. Your net investment should be shown in box 9b of Form 1099-R for the first year you received payments from the plan.

Rollovers.   Generally, a qualified rollover is a tax-free distribution of cash or other assets from one retirement plan that is contributed to another plan within 60 days of receiving the distribution. However, a qualified rollover to a Roth IRA or a designated Roth account is generally not a tax-free distribution. Use lines 12a and 12b to report a qualified rollover, including a direct rollover, from one qualified employer's plan to another or to an IRA or SEP.

  Enter on line 12a the distribution from Form 1099-R, box 1. From this amount, subtract any contributions (usually shown in box 5) that were taxable to you when made. From that result, subtract the amount of the qualified rollover. Enter the remaining amount on line 12b. If the remaining amount is zero and you have no other distribution to report on line 12b, enter zero on line 12b. Also, enter “Rollover” next to line 12b.

  See Pub. 575 for more details on rollovers, including special rules that apply to rollovers from designated Roth accounts, partial rollovers of property, and distributions under qualified domestic relations orders.

Lump-sum distributions.   If you received a lump-sum distribution from a profit-sharing or retirement plan, your Form 1099-R should have the “Total distribution” box in box 2b checked. You must use Form 1040 if you owe additional tax because you received an early distribution from a qualified retirement plan and the total amount wasn't rolled over in a qualified rollover. See Pub. 575 to find out if you owe this tax.

  Enter the total distribution on line 12a and the taxable part on line 12b. For details, see Pub. 575.

  
You may be able to pay less tax on the distribution if you were born before January 2, 1936, or you are the beneficiary of a deceased employee who was born before January 2, 1936. But you must use Form 1040 to do so. For details, see Form 4972.

Simplified Method Worksheet—Lines 12a and 12b

Before you begin:

  • If you are the beneficiary of a deceased employee or former employee who died before August 21, 1996, include any death benefit exclusion that you are entitled to (up to $5,000) in the amount entered on line 2 below.

More than one pension or annuity. If you had more than one partially taxable pension or annuity, figure the taxable part of each separately. Enter the total of the taxable parts on Form 1040A, line 12b. Enter the total pension or annuity payments received in 2015 on Form 1040A, line 12a.

1. Enter the total pension or annuity payments from Form 1099-R, box 1. Also, enter this amount on Form 1040A,  
line 12a
1.    
2. Enter your cost in the plan at the annuity starting date 2.      
  Note. If you completed this worksheet last year, skip line 3 and enter the amount from line 4 of last year's worksheet on line 4 below (even if the amount of your pension or annuity has changed). Otherwise, go to line 3.            
3. Enter the appropriate number from Table 1 below. But if your annuity starting date was after 1997 and the payments are for your life and that of your beneficiary, enter the appropriate number from Table 2 below 3.      
4. Divide line 2 by the number on line 3 4.      
5. Multiply line 4 by the number of months for which this year's payments were made. If your annuity starting date was before 1987, skip lines 6 and 7 and enter this amount on line 8. Otherwise, go to line 6 5.      
6. Enter the amount, if any, recovered tax free in years after 1986. If you completed this worksheet last year, enter the amount from line 10 of last year's worksheet 6.      
7. Subtract line 6 from line 2 7.      
8. Enter the smaller of line 5 or line 7 8.    
9. Taxable amount. Subtract line 8 from line 1. Enter the result, but not less than zero. Also, enter this amount on Form 1040A, line 12b. If your Form 1099-R shows a larger amount, use the amount on this line instead of the amount from Form 1099-R. If you are a retired public safety officer, see Insurance premiums for retired public safety officers before entering an amount on line 12b 9.    
10. Was your annuity starting date before 1987?        
 
Yes.
Do not complete the rest of this worksheet.        
 
No.
Add lines 6 and 8. This is the amount you have recovered tax free through 2015. You will need this number if you need to fill out this worksheet next year. 10.    
11. Balance of cost to be recovered. Subtract line 10 from line 2. If zero, you won't have to complete this worksheet next year. The payments you receive next year will generally be fully taxable. 11.    
   
Table 1 for Line 3 Above  
      AND your annuity starting date was—  
  IF the age at annuity starting date was . . .   before November 19, 1996, 
enter on line 3 . . .
  after November 18, 1996, enter on line 3 . . .    
  55 or under   300   360    
  56–60   260   310    
  61–65   240   260    
  66–70   170   210    
  71 or older   120   160    
Table 2 for Line 3 Above
  IF the combined ages at annuity 
starting date were . . .
  THEN enter on line 3 . . .    
  110 or under   410    
  111–120   360    
  121–130   310    
  131–140   260    
  141 or older   210    

Line 13

Unemployment Compensation and Alaska Permanent Fund Dividends

Unemployment compensation.   You should receive a Form 1099-G showing in box 1 the total unemployment compensation paid to you in 2015. Report this amount on line 13. However, if you made contributions to a governmental unemployment compensation program or to a governmental paid family leave program, reduce the amount you report on line 13 by those contributions.

  If you received an overpayment of unemployment compensation in 2015 and you repaid any of it in 2015, subtract the amount you repaid from the total amount you received. Enter the result on line 13. Also, enter “Repaid” and the amount you repaid in the space to the left of line 13. If, in 2015, you repaid unemployment compensation that you included in gross income in an earlier year, you can deduct the amount repaid. But you must use Form 1040 to do so. See Pub. 525 for details.

Alaska Permanent Fund dividends.   Include the dividends in the total on line 13.

Social Security Benefits Worksheet—Lines 14a and 14b

Before you begin:

  • Complete Form 1040A, lines 16 and 17, if they apply to you. 

  • If you are married filing separately and you lived apart from your spouse for all of 2015, enter “D” to the right of the word “benefits” on line 14a. If you do not, you may get a math error notice from the IRS. 

  • Be sure you have read the Exception in the line 14a and 14b instructions to see if you can use this worksheet instead of a publication to find out if any of your benefits are taxable. 

1.   Enter the total amount from box 5 of all your Forms SSA-1099 and Forms RRB-1099. Also, enter this amount on Form 1040A, line 14a 1.        
2.   Multiply line 1 by 50% (0.50) 2.    
3.   Enter the total of the amounts from Form 1040A, lines 7, 8a, 9a, 10, 11b, 12b, and 13 3.    
4.   Enter the amount, if any, from Form 1040A, line 8b 4.    
5.   Add lines 2, 3, and 4 5.    
6.   Enter the total of the amounts from Form 1040A, lines 16 and 17 6.    
7.   Is the amount on line 6 less than the amount on line 5?          
   
No.
None of your social security benefits are taxable. Enter -0- on Form 1040A, line 14b.          
   
Yes. Subtract line 6 from line 5 7.    
8.   If you are:
  • Married filing jointly, enter $32,000.

  • Single, head of household, qualifying widow(er), or married  
    filing separately and you lived apart from your  
    spouse for all of 2015, enter $25,000.

  8.    
   
  • Married filing separately and you lived with your spouse at any  
    time in 2015, skip lines 8 through 15; multiply line 7 by 85% (0.85)  
    and enter the result on line 16. Then go to line 17.

     
9.   Is the amount on line 8 less than the amount on line 7?      
   
No.
None of your social security benefits are taxable. Enter -0- on Form 1040A, line 14b. If you are married filing separately and you lived apart from your spouse for all of 2015, be sure you entered “D” to the right of the word “benefits” on line 14a.      
   
Yes. Subtract line 8 from line 7 9.    
10.   Enter: $12,000 if married filing jointly; $9,000 if single, head of household, qualifying widow(er), or married filing separately and you lived apart from your spouse for all of 2015 10.    
11.   Subtract line 10 from line 9. If zero or less, enter -0- 11.    
12.   Enter the smaller of line 9 or line 10 12.    
13.   Enter one-half of line 12 13.    
14.   Enter the smaller of line 2 or line 13 14.    
15.   Multiply line 11 by 85% (0.85). If line 11 is zero, enter -0- 15.    
16.   Add lines 14 and 15 16.    
17.   Multiply line 1 by 85% (0.85) 17.    
18.   Taxable social security benefits. Enter the smaller of line 16 or line 17. Also enter this amount on Form 1040A, line 14b 18.    
  If any of your benefits are taxable for 2015 and they include a lump-sum benefit payment that was for an earlier year, you may be able to reduce the taxable amount. See Lump-Sum Election in Pub. 915 for details.  

Lines 14a and 14b

Social Security Benefits

You should receive a Form SSA-1099 showing in box 3 the total social security benefits paid to you. Box 4 will show the amount of any benefits you repaid in 2015. If you received railroad retirement benefits treated as social security, you should receive a Form RRB-1099.

Use the Social Security Benefits Worksheet in these instructions to see if any of your benefits are taxable.

Exception.   Don't use the Social Security Benefits Worksheet if any of the following applies.

  
  • You made contributions to a traditional IRA for 2015 and you or your spouse were covered by a retirement plan at work. Instead, use the worksheets in Pub. 590-A to see if any of your social security benefits are taxable and to figure your IRA deduction.

  • You repaid any benefits in 2015 and your total repayments (box 4) were more than your total benefits for 2015 (box 3). None of your benefits are taxable for 2015. Also, you may be able to take an itemized deduction or a credit for part of the excess repayments if they were for benefits you included in gross income in an earlier year. But you must use Form 1040 to do so. For more details, see Pub. 915.

  • You file Form 8815. Instead, use the worksheet in Pub. 915.

  
Benefits for earlier year received in 2015? If any of your benefits are taxable for 2015, and they include a lump-sum benefit payment that was for an earlier year, you may be able to reduce the taxable amount. See Lump-Sum Election in Pub. 915 for details.

Social security information.   Social security beneficiaries can now get a variety of information from the SSA website with a my Social Security account, including getting a replacement Form SSA-1099 if needed. For more information and to set up an account, go to www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.

Form RRB-1099.   If you need a replacement Form RRB-1099, call the Railroad Retirement Board at 1-877-772-5772 or go to www.rrb.gov.

Adjusted Gross Income

Line 16

Educator Expenses

If you were an eligible educator in 2015, you can deduct on line 16 up to $250 of qualified expenses you paid in 2015. If you and your spouse are filing jointly and both of you were eligible educators, the maximum deduction is $500. However, neither spouse can deduct more than $250 of his or her qualified expenses on line 16. You may be able to deduct expenses that are more than the $250 (or $500) limit on Schedule A, line 21, but you must use Form 1040. An eligible educator is a kindergarten through grade 12 teacher, instructor, counselor, principal, or aide who worked in a school for at least 900 hours during a school year.

Qualified expenses include ordinary and necessary expenses paid in connection with books, supplies, equipment (including computer equipment, software, and services), and other materials used in the classroom. An ordinary expense is one that is common and accepted in your educational field. A necessary expense is one that is helpful and appropriate for your profession as an educator. An expense doesn't have to be required to be considered necessary.

Qualified expenses don't include expenses for home schooling or for nonathletic supplies for courses in health or physical education.

You must reduce your qualified expenses by the following amounts.

  • Excludable U.S. series EE and I savings bond interest from Form 8815.

  • Nontaxable qualified tuition program earnings or distributions.

  • Any nontaxable distribution of Coverdell education savings account earnings.

  • Any reimbursements you received for these expenses that weren't reported to you in box 1 of your Form W-2.

For more details, use Tax Topic 458 or see Pub. 529.

Line 17

IRA Deduction

If you made any nondeductible contributions to a traditional individual retirement arrangement (IRA) for 2015, you must report them on Form 8606.

If you made contributions to a traditional IRA for 2015, you may be able to take an IRA deduction. But you, or your spouse if filing a joint return, must have had earned income to do so. If you were a member of the U.S. Armed Forces, earned income includes any nontaxable combat pay you received. A statement should be sent to you by May 31, 2016, that shows all contributions to your traditional IRA for 2015.

Use the IRA Deduction Worksheet in these instructions to figure the amount, if any, of your IRA deduction. But read the following 11-item list before you fill in the worksheet.

  1. If you were age 70½ or older at the end of 2015, you can't deduct any contributions made to your traditional IRA for 2015 or treat them as nondeductible contributions.

  2. You can't deduct contributions to a Roth IRA. But you may be able to take the retirement savings contributions credit (saver's credit). See the instructions for line 34.

  3. If you are filing a joint return and you or your spouse made contributions to both a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA for 2015, don't use the IRA Deduction Worksheet in these instructions. Instead, see Pub. 590-A to figure the amount, if any, of your IRA deduction.

  4. You can't deduct elective deferrals to a 401(k) plan, 403(b) plan, section 457 plan, SIMPLE plan, or the federal Thrift Savings Plan. These amounts aren't included as income in box 1 of your Form W-2. But you may be able to take the retirement savings contributions credit. See the instructions for line 34.

  5. If you made contributions to your IRA in 2015 that you deducted for 2014, don't include them in the worksheet.

  6. If you received income from a nonqualified deferred compensation plan or nongovernmental section 457 plan that is included in box 1 of your Form W-2, don't include that income on line 8 of the worksheet. The income should be shown in (a) box 11 of your Form W-2 or (b) box 12 of your Form W-2 with code Z. If it isn't, contact your employer for the amount of the income.

  7. You must file a joint return to deduct contributions to your spouse's IRA. Enter the total IRA deduction for you and your spouse on line 17.

  8. Don't include qualified rollover contributions in figuring your deduction. Instead, see the instructions for lines 11a and 11b.

  9. Don't include trustees' fees that were billed separately and paid by you for your IRA. You may be able to deduct those fees as an itemized deduction. But you must use Form 1040 to do so.

  10. Don't include any repayments of qualified reservist distributions. You can't deduct them. For information on how to report these repayments, see Qualified reservist repayments in Pub. 590-A.

  11. If the total of your IRA deduction on line 17 plus any nondeductible contribution to your traditional IRAs shown on Form 8606 is less than your total traditional IRA contributions for 2015, see Pub. 590-A for special rules.

By April 1 of the year after the year in which you reach age 70½, you must start taking minimum required distributions from your traditional IRA. If you don't, you may have to pay a 50% additional tax on the amount that should have been distributed. For details, including how to figure the minimum required distribution, see Pub. 590-B.

IRA Deduction Worksheet—Line 17

If you were age 70½ or older at the end of 2015, you can't deduct any contributions made to your traditional IRA or treat them as nondeductible contributions. Don't complete this worksheet for anyone age 70½ or older at the end of 2015. If you are married filing jointly and only one spouse was under age 70½ at the end of 2015, complete this worksheet only for that spouse.

Before you begin:

  • Be sure you have read the 11-item list in the instructions for this line. You may not be able to use this worksheet.

  • If you are married filing separately and you lived apart from your spouse for all of 2015, enter “D” in the space to the left of line 17. If you do not, you may get a math error notice from the IRS.

    Your IRA Spouse's IRA  
1a.   Were you covered by a retirement plan (see Were you covered by a retirement plan?)? 1a.
Yes
No
     
b.   If married filing jointly, was your spouse covered by a retirement plan? 1b.
Yes
No
 
    Next. If you checked “No” on line 1a (and “No” on line 1b if married filing jointly), skip lines 2 through 6, enter the applicable amount below on line 7a (and line 7b if applicable), and go to line 8.
  • $5,500, if under age 50 at the end of 2015.

  • $6,500, if age 50 or older but under age 70½ at the end of 2015.

Otherwise, go to line 2.
         
2.   Enter the amount shown below that applies to you.          
   
  • Single, head of household, or married filing separately and you lived  
    apart
    from your spouse for all of 2015, enter $71,000

   
   
  • Qualifying widow(er), enter $118,000

  2a.   2b.    
   
  • Married filing jointly, enter $118,000 in both columns. But if you  
    checked “No” on either line 1a or 1b, enter $193,000 for  
    the person who wasn't covered by a plan

  • Married filing separately and you lived with your spouse at any time in  
    2015, enter $10,000

           
3.   Enter the amount from Form 1040A, line 15 3.            
4.   Enter the amount, if any, from Form 1040A, line 16 4.            
5.   Subtract line 4 from line 3. If married filing jointly, enter the result in both columns 5a.   5b.    
6.   Is the amount on line 5 less than the amount on line 2?          
   
No.
None of your IRA contributions are deductible. For details on nondeductible IRA contributions, see Form 8606.          
   
Yes.
Subtract line 5 from line 2 in each column. Follow the instruction below that applies to you.    
       
  • If single, head of household, or married filing separately, 
    and the result is $10,000 or more, enter the applicable amount  
    below on line 7 for that column and go to line 8.  
    i. $5,500, if under age 50 at the end of 2015. 
    ii. $6,500, if age 50 or older but under age 70½ at the end  
    of 2015. 
    If the result is less than $10,000, go to line 7.

  6a.   6b.    
       
  • If married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er), and the  
    result is $20,000 or more ($10,000 or more in the column for  
    the IRA of a person who wasn't covered by a retirement 
    plan), enter the applicable amount below on line 7 for that  
    column and go to line 8. 
    i. $5,500, if under age 50 at the end of 2015. 
    ii. $6,500, if age 50 or older but under age 70½ at the end  
    of 2015. 
    Otherwise, go to line 7.

           
   

IRA Deduction Worksheet— (continued)

      Your IRA Spouse's IRA  
7.   Multiply lines 6a and 6b by the percentage below that applies to you. If the result isn't a multiple of $10, increase it to the next multiple of $10 (for example, increase $490.30 to $500). If the result is $200 or more, enter the result. But if it is less than $200, enter $200.    
   
  • Single, head of household, or married filing 
    separately, multiply by 55% (0.55) (or by 65% (0.65) in the 
    column for the IRA of a person who is age 50 or older at 
    the end of 2015)

  7a.   7b.    
   
  • Married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er), multiply by 27.5%  
    (0.275) (or by 32.5% (0.325) in the column for the IRA of a  
    person who is age 50 or older at the end of 2015). But if you  
    checked “No” on either line 1a or 1b, then in the  
    column for the IRA of the person who wasn't covered by a  
    retirement plan, multiply by 55% (0.55) (or by 65% (0.65) if age  
    50 or older at the end of 2015)

           
8.   Enter the amount from Form 1040A, line 7. Include any nontaxable combat pay. This amount should be reported in box 12 of Form W-2 with code Q 8.            
   
   
If married filing jointly and line 8 is less than $11,000 ($12,000 if one spouse is age 50 or older at the end of 2015; $13,000 if both spouses are age 50 or older at the end of 2015), stop here and see Pub. 590-A to figure your IRA deduction. 
           
9.   Enter traditional IRA contributions made, or that will be made by the due date of your 2015 return not counting extensions (April 18, 2016, for most people), for 2015 to your IRA on line 9a and to your spouse's IRA on line 9b 9a.   9b.    
10.   On line 10a, enter the smallest of line 7a, 8, or 9a. On line 10b, enter the smallest of line 7b, 8, or 9b. This is the most you can deduct. Add the amounts on lines 10a and 10b and enter the total on Form 1040A, line 17. Or, if you want, you can deduct a smaller amount and treat the rest as a nondeductible contribution (see Form 8606) 10a.   10b.    
   

You must use Form 1040 if you owe tax on any excess contributions made to an IRA or any excess accumulations in an IRA. For details, see Pub. 590-A.

Were you covered by a retirement plan?   If you were covered by a retirement plan (401(k), SIMPLE, etc.) at work, your IRA deduction may be reduced or eliminated. But you can still make contributions to an IRA even if you can't deduct them. In any case, the income earned on your IRA contributions isn't taxed until it is paid to you. The “Retirement plan” box in box 13 of your Form W-2 should be checked if you were covered by a plan at work even if you weren't vested in the plan.

If you were covered by a retirement plan and you file Form 8815, see Pub. 590-A to figure the amount, if any, of your IRA deduction.

Married persons filing separately.   If you weren't covered by a retirement plan but your spouse was, you are considered covered by a plan unless you lived apart from your spouse for all of 2015.

  
You may be able to take the retirement savings contributions credit. See the line 34 instructions.

Line 18

Student Loan Interest Deduction

You can take this deduction only if all of the following apply.

  • You paid interest in 2015 on a qualified student loan (defined later).

  • Your filing status is any status except married filing separately.

  • Your modified adjusted gross income (AGI) is less than: $80,000 if single, head of household, or qualifying widow(er); $160,000 if married filing jointly. Use lines 2 through 4 of the Student Loan Interest Deduction Worksheet to figure your modified AGI.

  • You, or your spouse if filing jointly, aren't claimed as a dependent on someone's (such as your parent's) 2015 tax return.

Use the Student Loan Interest Deduction Worksheet to figure your student loan interest deduction.

Qualified student loan.   A qualified student loan is any loan you took out to pay the qualified higher education expenses for any of the following individuals who was an eligible student.
  1. Yourself or your spouse.

  2. Any person who was your dependent when the loan was taken out.

  3. Any person you could have claimed as a dependent for the year the loan was taken out except that:

    1. The person filed a joint return,

    2. The person had gross income that was equal to or more than the exemption amount for that year ($4,000 for 2015), or

    3. You, or your spouse if filing jointly, could be claimed as a dependent on someone else's return.

However, a loan isn't a qualified student loan if (a) any of the proceeds were used for other purposes, or (b) the loan was from either a related person or a person who borrowed the proceeds under a qualified employer plan or a contract purchased under such a plan. For details, see Pub. 970.

Qualified higher education expenses.   Qualified higher education expenses generally include tuition, fees, room and board, and related expenses such as books and supplies. The expenses must be for education in a degree, certificate, or similar program at an eligible educational institution. An eligible educational institution includes most colleges, universities, and certain vocational schools. For details, see Pub. 970.

Student Loan Interest Deduction Worksheet—Line 18

Before you begin:

  • See the instructions for line 18.

1.   Enter the total interest you paid in 2015 on qualified student loans (see the instructions for line 18). Do not enter more than $2,500 1.    
2.   Enter the amount from Form 1040A, line 15 2.        
3.   Enter the total of the amounts from Form 1040A, lines 16 and 17 3.        
4.   Subtract line 3 from line 2 4.        
5.   Enter the amount shown below for your filing status.          
 
  • Single, head of household, or qualifying widow(er)—$65,000

  • Married filing jointly—$130,000

    5.        
6.   Is the amount on line 4 more than the amount on line 5?          
   
No.
Skip lines 6 and 7, enter -0- on line 8, and go to line 9.          
   
Yes.
Subtract line 5 from line 4 6.        
7.   Divide line 6 by $15,000 ($30,000 if married filing jointly). Enter the result as a decimal (rounded to at least three places). If the result is 1.000 or more, enter 1.000 7. .  
8.   Multiply line 1 by line 7 8.    
9.   Student loan interest deduction. Subtract line 8 from line 1. Enter the result here and on Form 1040A, line 18 9.    
   

Line 19

Tuition and Fees

If you paid qualified tuition and fees for yourself, your spouse, or your dependent(s), you may be able to take this deduction. See Form 8917.

You may be able to take a credit for your educational expenses instead of a deduction. See the instructions for lines 33 and 44 for details.

Tax, Credits, and Payments

Line 23a

If you were born before January 2, 1951, or were blind at the end of 2015, check the appropriate boxes on line 23a. If you were married and checked the box on Form 1040A, line 6b, and your spouse was born before January 2, 1951, or was blind at the end of 2015, also check the appropriate boxes for your spouse. Be sure to enter the total number of boxes checked. Don't check any box(es) for your spouse if your filing status is head of household.

Death of spouse in 2015.   If your spouse was born before January 2, 1951, but died in 2015 before reaching age 65, don't check the box that says “Spouse was born before January 2, 1951.

  A person is considered to reach age 65 on the day before his or her 65th birthday.

Example.

Your spouse was born on February 14, 1950, and died on February 13, 2015. Your spouse is considered age 65 at the time of death. Check the appropriate box for your spouse on line 23a. However, if your spouse died on February 12, 2015, your spouse isn't considered age 65. Don't check the box.

Death of taxpayer in 2015.   If you are preparing a return for someone who died in 2015, see Pub. 501 before completing line 23a.

Blindness.   If you weren't totally blind as of December 31, 2015, you must get a statement certified by your eye doctor (ophthalmologist or optometrist) that:
  • You can't see better than 20/200 in your better eye with glasses or contact lenses, or

  • Your field of vision is 20 degrees or less.

  If your eye condition isn't likely to improve beyond the conditions listed above, you can get a statement certified by your eye doctor (ophthalmologist or optometrist) to this effect instead.

  You must keep the statement for your records.

Line 23b

If your filing status is married filing separately (box 3 is checked) and your spouse itemizes deductions on Form 1040, check the box on line 23b. You can't take the standard deduction even if you were born before January 2, 1951, or were blind. Enter -0- on line 24 and go to line 25.

In most cases, your federal income tax will be less if you take the larger of any itemized deductions you may have or the standard deduction. To itemize deductions, you must file Form 1040.

Line 24

Standard Deduction

Most people can find their standard deduction by looking at the amounts listed under “All others” to the left of line 24.

Exception 1–dependent.   If you, or your spouse if filing jointly, can be claimed as a dependent on someone else's 2015 return, use the Standard Deduction Worksheet for Dependents to figure your standard deduction.

Exception 2–box on line 23a checked.   If you checked any box on line 23a, figure your standard deduction using the Standard Deduction Chart for People Who Were Born Before January 2, 1951, or Were Blind.

Exception 3–box on line 23b checked.   If you checked the box on line 23b, your standard deduction is zero, even if your were born before January 2, 1951, or were blind.

Standard Deduction Worksheet for Dependents—Line 24

Use this worksheet only if someone can claim you, or your spouse if filing jointly, as a dependent.

1.   Is your earned income* more than $700?      
   
Yes.
Add $350 to your earned income. Enter the total     1.    
   
No.
Enter $1,050
2.   Enter the amount shown below for your filing status.      
 
  • Single or married filing separately—$6,300

  • Married filing jointly—$12,600

  • Head of household—$9,250

    2.    
3.   Standard deduction.          
  a. Enter the smaller of line 1 or line 2. If born after January 1, 1951, and not blind, stop here and enter this amount on Form 1040A, line 24. Otherwise, go to line 3b 3a.    
  b. If born before January 2, 1951, or blind, multiply the number on Form 1040A, line 23a, by $1,250 ($1,550 if single or head of household) 3b.    
  c. Add lines 3a and 3b. Enter the total here and on Form 1040A, line 24 3c.    
* Earned income includes wages, salaries, tips, professional fees, and other compensation received for personal services you performed. It also includes any taxable scholarship or fellowship grant. Generally, your earned income is the total of the amount you reported on Form 1040A, line 7.

Standard Deduction Chart for People Who Were Born Before January 2, 1951, or Were Blind—Line 24

Do not use this chart if someone can claim you, or your spouse if filing jointly, as a dependent. Instead, use the Standard Deduction Worksheet for Dependents.
Enter the number from the box on  
Form 1040A, line 23a
 
Do not use the number of exemptions from line 6d.  
IF your filing  
status is . . .
AND the number in  
the box above is . . .
  THEN your standard  
deduction is . . .
 
Single 1  
2
  $7,850 
9,400
   
Married filing jointly  
or  
Qualifying widow(er)
1  


4
  $13,850 
15,100 
16,350 
17,600
   
Married filing separately


4
  $7,550 
8,800 
10,050 
11,300
   
Head of household
2
  $10,800 
12,350
   

Line 26

Exemptions

You usually can deduct $4,000 on line 26 for each exemption you can take. But if your filing status is married filing separately, and the amount on line 21 is over $154,950, your exemption amount may be reduced. You must file Form 1040 instead of Form 1040A.

Line 28

Tax

Do you want the IRS to figure your tax for you?

Yes. See chapter 30 of Pub. 17 for details, including who is eligible and what to do. If you have paid too much, we will send you a refund. If you didn't pay enough, we will send you a bill.
No. Use the Tax Table to figure your tax unless you are required to use Form 8615 (see Form 8615, later) or the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet in these instructions. Also include in the total on line 28 any of the following taxes.

Tax from recapture of education credits.   You may owe this tax if (a) you claimed an education credit in an earlier year, and (b) either tax-free educational assistance or a refund of qualified expenses was received in 2015 for the student. See the Instructions for Form 8863 for more details. If you owe this tax, enter the amount and “ECR” to the left of the entry space for line 28.

Alternative minimum tax.   If both 1 and 2 next apply to you, use the Alternative Minimum Tax Worksheet in these instructions to see if you owe this tax and, if you do, the amount to include on line 28.
  1. The amount on Form 1040A, line 26, is: $28,000 or more if single or married filing jointly; $32,000 if a qualifying widow(er); or $16,000 or more if head of household or married filing separately.

  2. The amount on Form 1040A, line 22, is more than: $53,600 if single or head of household; $83,400 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er); $41,700 if married filing separately.

  For help with the alternative minimum tax, go to www.irs.gov/AMT.

  
If filing for a child who must use Form 8615 to figure the tax (see below), and the amount on Form 1040A, line 22, is more than the total of $7,400 plus the amount on Form 1040A, line 7, don't file this form. Instead, file Form 1040 for the child. Use Form 6251 to see if the child owes this tax.

Alternative Minimum Tax Worksheet—Line 28

Before you begin:

  • Figure the amount you would enter on Form 1040A, line 30, as if you do not owe this tax.

1. Enter the amount from Form 1040A, line 22 1.        
2. Enter the amount shown below for your filing status  
 
  • Single or head of household—$53,600

  • Married filing jointly or qualifying 
    widow(er)—$83,400

  • Married filing separately—$41,700

  2        
3. Subtract line 2 from line 1. If zero or less, stop here; you do not owe this tax 3.        
4. Enter the amount shown below for your filing status.  
 
  • Single or head of household—$119,200

  • Married filing jointly or qualifying 
    widow(er)—$158,900

  • Married filing separately—$79,450

  4.            
5. Subtract line 4 from line 1. If zero or less, enter -0- here and on line 6, and go to line 7 5.            
6. Multiply line 5 by 25% (0.25) 6.        
7. Add lines 3 and 6 7.        
8. If line 7 is $185,400 or less ($92,700 or less if married filing separately), multiply line 7 by 26% (0.26). Otherwise, multiply line 7 by 28% (0.28) and subtract $3,708 ($1,854 if married filing separately) from the result 8.            
9. Did you use the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet to figure the tax on the amount on Form 1040A, line 27?              
 
No.
Skip lines 9 through 19; enter the amount from line 8 on line 20 and go to line 21.              
 
Yes.
Enter the amount from line 4 of that worksheet 9.            
10. Enter the smaller of line 7 or line 9 10.        
11. Subtract line 10 from line 7 11.        
12. If line 11 is $185,400 or less ($92,700 or less if married filing separately), multiply line 11 by 26% (0.26). Otherwise, multiply line 11 by 28% (0.28) and subtract $3,708 ($1,854 if married filing separately) from the result 12.    
13. Enter the amount shown below for your filing status:          
 
  • Single or married filing separately— $37,450

  • Married filing jointly or Qualifying widow(er)— $74,900

  • Head of household—$50,200

  13.        
14. Enter the amount from line 5 of the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet 14.        
15. Subtract line 14 from line 13. If zero or less, enter -0- 15.        
16. Enter the smaller of line 10 or line 15 16.        
17. Subtract line 16 from line 10 17.        
18. Multiply line 17 by 15% (0.15) 18.    
19. Add lines 12 and 18 19.    
20. Enter the smaller of line 8 or line 19 20.    
21. Enter the amount you would enter on Form 1040A, line 30, if you do not owe this tax 21.    
22. Alternative minimum tax. Is the amount on line 20 more than the amount on line 21?  
 
No.
You do not owe this tax.  
 
Yes.
Subtract line 21 from line 20. Also include this amount in the total on Form 1040A, line 28. Enter “AMT” and show the amount in the space to the left of line 28 22.    
   

Form 8615

Form 8615 generally must be used to figure the tax for any child who had more than $2,100 of unearned income, such as taxable interest, ordinary dividends, or capital gain distributions, and who either:

  1. Was under age 18 at the end of 2015,

  2. Was age 18 at the end of 2015 and didn't have earned income that was more than half of the child's support, or

  3. Was a full-time student at least age 19 but under age 24 at the end of 2015 and didn't have earned income that was more than half of the child's support.

But if the child files a joint return for 2015 or if neither of the child's parents was alive at the end of 2015, don't use Form 8615 to figure the child's tax.

A child born on January 1, 1998, is considered to be age 18 at the end of 2015; a child born on January 1, 1997, is considered to be age 19 at the end of 2015; a child born on January 1, 1992, is considered to be age 24 at the end of 2015.

Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet

If you received qualified dividends or capital gain distributions, use the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet to figure your tax.

Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet—Line 28

Before you begin:

  • Be sure you do not have to file Form 1040 (see the Instructions for Form 1040A,  
    line 10).

1. Enter the amount from Form 1040A, line 27 1.        
2. Enter the amount from Form 1040A, line 9b 2.            
3. Enter the amount from Form 1040A, line 10 3.            
4. Add lines 2 and 3 4.        
5. Subtract line 4 from line 1. If zero or less, enter -0- 5.        
6. Enter the smaller of:          
 
  • The amount on line 1, or

           
 
  • $37,450 if single or married filing separately,

    6.        
  $74,900 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er), or              
  $50,200 if head of household.              
7. Enter the smaller of line 5 or line 6 7.        
8. Subtract line 7 from line 6. This amount is taxed at 0% 8.        
9. Enter the smaller of line 1 or line 4 9.        
10. Enter the amount from line 8 10.        
11. Subtract line 10 from line 9 11.        
12. Multiply line 11 by 15% (0.15) 12.    
13. Use the Tax Table to figure the tax on the amount on line 5. Enter the tax here 13.    
14. Add lines 12 and 13 14.    
15. Use the Tax Table to figure the tax on the amount on line 1. Enter the tax here 15.    
16. Tax on all taxable income. Enter the smaller of line 14 or line 15 here and on Form 1040A,  
line 28
16.    
   

Line 29

Excess Advance Premium Tax Credit Repayment

The premium tax credit helps pay premiums for health insurance purchased from the Marketplace. If advance payments were made for coverage for you, your spouse, or your dependent, complete Form 8962. If the advance payments were more than the premium tax credit you can claim, enter the amount from Form 8962, line 29.

You may have to repay excess advance premium tax credit payments even if someone else enrolled you, your spouse, or your dependent. You may also have to repay excess advance premium tax credit payments if you enrolled someone in coverage through the Marketplace whom you don't claim as a dependent on your return. For more information, see the instructions for Form 8962.

Line 31

Credit for Child and Dependent Care Expenses

You may be able to take this credit if you paid someone to care for any of the following persons.

  1. Your qualifying child under age 13 whom you claim as your dependent.

  2. Your disabled spouse or any other disabled person who couldn't care for himself or herself.

  3. Your child whom you couldn't claim as a dependent because of the rules for Children of divorced or separated parents in the instructions for line 6c.

For details, use Tax Topic 602 or see Form 2441.

Line 32

Credit for the Elderly or the Disabled

You may be able to take this credit if by the end of 2015 (a) you were age 65 or older, or (b) you retired on permanent and total disability and you had taxable disability income. But you can't take the credit if:

  1. The amount on Form 1040A, line 22, is $17,500 or more ($20,000 or more if married filing jointly and only one spouse is eligible for the credit; $25,000 or more if married filing jointly and both spouses are eligible; $12,500 or more if married filing separately and you lived apart from your spouse all year), or

  2. You received one or more of the following benefits totaling $5,000 or more ($7,500 or more if married filing jointly and both spouses are eligible for the credit; $3,750 or more if married filing separately and you lived apart from your spouse all year).

    1. Nontaxable part of social security benefits.

    2. Nontaxable part of tier 1 railroad retirement benefits treated as social security.

    3. Nontaxable veterans' pensions (excluding military disability pensions).

    4. Any other nontaxable pensions, annuities, or disability income excluded from income under any provision of law other than the Internal Revenue Code.

For this purpose, don't include amounts treated as a return of your cost of a pension or annuity. Also, don't include a disability annuity payable under section 808 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 or any pension, annuity, or similar allowance for personal injuries or sickness resulting from active service in the armed forces of any country, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or the Public Health Service.

You must include Schedule R with your return to claim this credit.

See Schedule R and its instructions for details.

Credit figured by the IRS.   If you can take this credit and you want us to figure it for you, see the Instructions for Schedule R.

Line 33

Education Credits

If you (or your dependent) paid qualified expenses in 2015 for yourself, your spouse, or your dependent to enroll in or attend an eligible educational institution, you may be able to take an education credit. See Form 8863 for details. However, you can't take an education credit if any of the following applies.

  • You, or your spouse if filing jointly, are claimed as a dependent on someone else's (such as your parent's) 2015 tax return.

  • Your filing status is married filing separately.

  • The amount on Form 1040A, line 22, is $90,000 or more ($180,000 or more if married filing jointly).

  • You are taking a deduction for tuition and fees on Form 1040A, line 19, for the same student.

  • You, or your spouse, were a nonresident alien for any part of 2015 unless your filing status is married filing jointly.

To find out which education benefits you qualify for, go to www.irs.gov/uac/Am-I-Eligible-to-Claim-an-Education-Credit%3F.

You must include Form 8863 with your return to claim this credit.

See Form 8863 and its instructions for details.

Line 34

Retirement Savings Contributions Credit (Saver's Credit)

You may be able to take this credit if you, or your spouse if filing jointly, made (a) contributions, other than rollover contributions, to a traditional or Roth IRA (including a myRA); (b) elective deferrals to a 401(k) or 403(b) plan (including designated Roth contributions), or to a governmental 457, SEP, or SIMPLE plan; (c) voluntary employee contributions to a qualified retirement plan (including the federal Thrift Savings Plan); or (d) contributions to a 501(c)(18)(D) plan.

However, you can't take the credit if either of the following applies.

  1. The amount on Form 1040A, line 22, is more than $30,500 ($45,750 if head of household; $61,000 if married filing jointly).

  2. The person(s) who made the qualified contribution or elective deferral (a) was born after January 1, 1998, (b) is claimed as a dependent on someone else's 2015 tax return, or (c) was a student (defined next).

You were a student if during any part of 5 calendar months of 2015 you:

  • Were enrolled as a full-time student at a school, or

  • Took a full-time, on-farm training course given by a school or a state, county, or local government agency.

A school includes a technical, trade, or mechanical school. It doesn't include an on-the-job training course, correspondence school, or school offering courses only through the Internet.

You must include Form 8880 with your return to claim this credit.

For more details, use Tax Topic 610 or see Form 8880.

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Line 38

Health Care: Individual Responsibility

You must either:

  • Have qualifying health care coverage for every month of 2015 for yourself, your spouse (if filing jointly), and anyone you can or do claim as a dependent (you are treated as having coverage for any month in which you have coverage for at least 1 day of the month),

  • Qualify for an exemption from the requirement to have health care coverage, or

  • Make a shared responsibility payment with your return and enter the amount on this line.

If you had qualifying health care coverage (called minimum essential coverage) for every month of 2015 for yourself, your spouse (if filing jointly), and anyone you can or do claim as a dependent, check the box on this line and leave the entry space blank.

Otherwise, don't check the box on this line. If you, your spouse (if filing jointly) or someone you can or do claim as a dependent didn't have coverage for each month of 2015 you must either claim a coverage exemption on Form 8965 or report a shared responsibility payment on line 38. See the instructions for Form 8965 for information on coverage exemptions and figuring the shared responsibility payment.

You can check the box even if:

  • A dependent child who was born or adopted during the year wasn't covered by your insurance during the month of or months before birth or adoption (but the child must have had minimum essential coverage every month of 2015 following the birth or adoption), or

  • A spouse or dependent who died during the year wasn't covered by your insurance during the month of death and months after death (but he or she must have had minimum essential coverage every month of 2015 he or she was alive).

If you can be claimed as a dependent, don't check the box on this line. Leave the entry space blank. You don't need to attach Form 8965 or see its instructions.

If you or someone in your household had minimum essential coverage in 2015, the provider of that coverage is required to send you a Form 1095-A, 1095-B, or 1095-C (with Part III completed) that lists individuals in your family who were enrolled in the coverage and shows their months of coverage.

  • Individuals enrolled in health insurance coverage through the Marketplace generally receive this information on Form 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace Statement.

  • Individuals enrolled in health insurance coverage provided by their employer generally receive this information on either Form 1095-B, Health Coverage, or on Form 1095-C, Employer-Provided Health Insurance Offer and Coverage.

  • Individuals enrolled in a government-sponsored health program or in other types of coverage generally receive this information on Form 1095-B, Health Coverage.

Even if you haven't received one of these forms, you may have had health care coverage and can rely on other information you have about your coverage to complete line 38.

Your health care coverage provider may have asked for your social security number. To understand why, go to www.irs.gov/ACASSN.

Minimum essential coverage.   Most health care coverage that people have is minimum essential coverage.

  Minimum essential coverage includes:
  • Most types of health care coverage provided by your employer,

  • Many types of government-sponsored health care coverage including Medicare, most Medicaid coverage, and most health care coverage provided to veterans and active duty service members,

  • Certain types of health care coverage you buy directly from an insurance company, and

  • Health care coverage you buy through the Marketplace.

See the instructions for Form 8965 for more information on what qualifies as minimum essential coverage.

Reminder - health care coverage.   If you need health care coverage, go to www.HealthCare.gov to learn about health insurance options for you and your family, how to buy health insurance, and how you might qualify to get financial assistance to buy health insurance.

Premium tax credit.   If you, your spouse, or a dependent enrolled in health insurance through the Marketplace, you may be able to claim the premium tax credit. See the instructions for line 45 and Form 8962.

Line 40

Federal Income Tax Withheld

Add the amounts shown as federal income tax withheld on your Forms W-2 and 1099-R. Enter the total on line 40. The amount withheld should be shown in box 2 of Form W-2, and in box 4 of Form 1099-R. Attach your Form(s) W-2 to the front of your paper return. Attach Form(s) 1099-R to the front of your return if federal income tax was withheld.

If you received a 2015 Form 1099 showing federal income tax withheld on dividends, taxable or tax-exempt interest income, unemployment compensation, social security benefits, or railroad retirement benefits, include the amount withheld in the total on line 40. This should be shown in box 4 of Form 1099, box 6 of Form SSA-1099, or box 10 of Form RRB-1099. If federal income tax was withheld from your Alaska Permanent Fund dividends, include the tax withheld in the total on line 40.

Line 41

2015 Estimated Tax Payments

Enter any estimated federal income tax payments you made for 2015. Include any overpayment that you applied to your 2015 estimated tax from:

  • Your 2014 return, or

  • An amended return (Form 1040X).

If you and your spouse paid joint estimated tax but are now filing separate income tax returns, you can divide the amount paid in any way you choose as long as you both agree. If you can't agree, you must divide the payments in proportion to each spouse's individual tax as shown on your separate returns for 2015. For an example of how to do this, see Pub. 505. You may want to attach an explanation of how you and your spouse divided the payments. Be sure to show both social security numbers (SSNs) in the space provided on the separate returns. If you or your spouse paid separate estimated tax but you are now filing a joint return, add the amounts you each paid. Follow these instructions even if your spouse died in 2015 or in 2016 before filing a 2015 return.

Divorced taxpayers.   If you got divorced in 2015 and you made joint estimated tax payments with your former spouse, enter your former spouse's SSN in the space provided on the front of Form 1040A. If you were divorced and remarried in 2015, enter your present spouse's SSN in the space provided on the front of Form 1040A. Also, in the blank space to the left of line 41, enter your former spouse's SSN, followed by “DIV.

Name change.   If you changed your name because of marriage, divorce, etc., and you made estimated tax payments using your former name, attach a statement to the front of Form 1040A. On the statement, explain all the payments you and your spouse made in 2015 and the name(s) and SSN(s) under which you made them.

Lines 42a and 42b—Earned Income Credit (EIC)

What is the EIC?

The EIC is a credit for certain people who work. The credit may give you a refund even if you don't owe any tax or didn't have any tax withheld.

To Take the EIC:

  • Follow the steps below.

  • Complete the Earned Income Credit (EIC) Worksheet in these instructions or let the IRS figure the credit for you.

  • If you have a qualifying child, complete and attach Schedule EIC.

For help in determining if you are eligible for the EIC, go to  
www.irs.gov/eitc and click on “EITC Assistant.” This service is available in English and Spanish.

If you take the EIC even though you aren't eligible and it is determined that your error is due to reckless or intentional disregard of the EIC rules, you won't be allowed to take the credit for 2 years even if you are otherwise eligible to do so. If you fraudulently take the EIC, you won't be allowed to take the credit for 10 years. See Form 8862, who must file, later. You may also have to pay penalties.

Step 1. All Filers

1. If, in 2015:

  • 3 or more children lived with you, is the amount on Form 1040A, line 22, less than $47,747 ($53,267 if married filing jointly)?
  • 2 children lived with you, is the amount on Form 1040A, line 22, less than $44,454 ($49,974 if married filing jointly)?
  • 1 child lived with you, is the amount on Form 1040A, line 22, less than $39,131 ($44,651 if married filing jointly)?
  • No children lived with you, is the amount on Form 1040A, line 22, less than $14,820 ($20,330 if married filing jointly)?

3 or more children lived with you, is the amount on Form 1040A, line 22, less than $47,747 ($53,267 if married filing jointly)? 2 children lived with you, is the amount on Form 1040A, line 22, less than $44,454 ($49,974 if married filing jointly)? 1 child lived with you, is the amount on Form 1040A, line 22, less than $39,131 ($44,651 if married filing jointly)? No children lived with you, is the amount on Form 1040A, line 22, less than $14,820 ($20,330 if married filing jointly)?

 [ ]
Yes.

 [ ]
No.

You can't take the credit.

2. Do you, and your spouse if filing a joint return, have a social security number that allows you to work and is valid for EIC purposes (explained later under Definitions and Special Rules)?

 [ ]
Yes.

 [ ]
No.

You can't take the credit. Enter “No” to the left of the entry space for line 42a.

3. Is your filing status married filing separately?

 [ ]
Yes.

You can't take the credit.

 [ ]
No.

4. Were you or your spouse a nonresident alien for any part of 2015?

 [ ]
Yes.

See Nonresident aliens, later, under Definitions and Special Rules.

 [ ]
No.

Go to Step 2.

Step 2. Investment Income

1. Add the amounts from  
Form 1040A:

  Line 8a      
  Line 8b +    
  Line 9a +    
  Line 10 +    
         
Investment Income =    
         

2. Is your investment income more than $3,400?

 [ ]
Yes.

You can't take the credit.

 [ ]
No.

Go to Step 3.

Step 3. Qualifying Child

A qualifying child for the EIC is a child who is your...
Son, daughter, stepchild, foster child, brother, sister, stepbrother, stepsister, half brother, half sister, or a descendant of any of them (for example, your grandchild, niece, or nephew),
was ...
Under age 19 at the end of 2015 and younger than you (or your spouse, if filing jointly)
or
Under age 24 at the end of 2015, a student (defined later), and younger than you (or your spouse, if filing jointly)
or
Any age and permanently and totally disabled (defined later)
Who isn't filing a joint return for 2015 or is filing a joint return for 2015 only to claim a refund of withheld income tax or estimated tax paid (see Pub. 596 for examples)
Who lived with you in the United States for more than half of 2015.
You can't take the credit for a child who didn't live with you for more than half the year, even if you paid most of the child's living expenses. The IRS may ask you for documents to show you lived with each qualifying child. Documents you might want to keep for this purpose include school and child care records and other records that show your child's address.
If the child didn't live with you for more than half of 2015 because of a temporary absence, birth, death, or kidnapping, see Exception to time lived with you,
If the child meets the conditions to be a qualifying child of any other person (other than your spouse if filing a joint return) for 2015, see Qualifying child of more than one person, later. If the child was married, see Married child, later.

1. Do you have at least one child who meets the conditions to be your qualifying child?

 [ ]
Yes.

The child must have a valid social security number (SSN) as defined later, unless the child was born and died in 2015. If at least one qualifying child has a valid SSN (or was born or died in 2015), go to question 2. Otherwise, you can't take the credit.

 [ ]
No.

Skip questions 2 and 3; go to Step 4.

2. Are you filing a joint return for 2015?

 [ ]
Yes.

Skip question 3 and Step 4; go to Step 5.

 [ ]
No.

3. Could you be a qualifying child of another person for 2015? (Check “No” if the other person isn't required to file, and isn't filing, a 2015 tax return or is filing a 2015 return only to claim a refund of withheld income tax or estimated tax paid (see Pub. 596 for examples).)

 [ ]
Yes.

You can't take the credit. Enter “No” to the left of the entry space for line 42a.

 [ ]
No.

Skip Step 4; go to Step 5.

Step 4. Filers Without a Qualifying Child

1. Is the amount on Form 1040A, line 22, less than $14,820 ($20,330 if married filing jointly)?

 [ ]
Yes.

 [ ]
No.

You can't take the credit.

2. Were you, or your spouse if filing a joint return, at least age 25 but under age 65 at the end of 2015? (Check “Yes” if you or your spouse if filing a joint return, were born after December 31, 1950, and before January 2, 1991.) If your spouse died in 2015 (or if you are preparing a return for someone who died in 2015), see Pub. 596 before you answer.

 [ ]
Yes.

 [ ]
No.

You can't take the credit.

3. Was your main home, and your spouse's if filing a joint return, in the United States for more than half of 2015? Members of the military stationed outside the United States, see Members of the military, later, before you answer.

 [ ]
Yes.

 [ ]
No.

You can't take the credit. Enter “No” to the left of the entry space for line 42a.

4. Are you filing a joint return for 2015?

 [ ]
Yes.

Skip questions 5 and 6; go to Step 5.

 [ ]
No.

5. Could you be a qualifying child of another person for 2015? (Check “No” if the other person isn't required to file, and isn't filing, a 2015 tax return or is filing a 2015 return only to claim a refund of withheld income tax or estimated tax paid (see Pub. 596 for examples).)

 [ ]
Yes.

You can't take the credit. Enter “No” to the left of the entry space for line 42a.

 [ ]
No.

6. Can you be claimed as a dependent on someone else's 2015 tax return?

 [ ]
Yes.

You can't take the credit.

 [ ]
No.

Go to Step 5.

Step 5. Earned Income

 

1. Complete the following worksheet.

Earned Income Worksheet
1. Enter the amount from Form 1040A, line 7 1.    
2. Enter any amount included on Form 1040A, line 7, that is a taxable scholarship or fellowship grant not reported on a Form W-2 2.    
3. Enter any amount included on Form 1040A, line 7, that you received for work performed while an inmate in a penal institution. (Enter “PRI” and the same amount on the dotted line next to Form 1040A, line 7 3.    
4. Enter any amount included on Form 1040A, line 7, that you received as a pension or annuity from a nonqualified deferred compensation plan or a nongovernmental section 457 plan. (Enter “DFC” and the same amount on the dotted line next to Form 1040A, line 7). This amount may be shown in box 11 of Form W-2. If you received such an amount but box 11 is blank, contact your employer for the amount received 4.    
5. Add lines 2, 3, and 4 5.    
6. Subtract line 5 from line 1 6.    
7. Enter all your nontaxable combat pay if you elect to include it in earned income. Also enter this amount on Form 1040A, line 42b. See Combat pay, nontaxable, later 7.    
   
Electing to include nontaxable combat pay may increase or decrease your EIC. Figure the credit with and without your nontaxable combat pay before making the election.
     
8. Add lines 6 and 7. This is your earned income 8.    

2. If you have:

  • 3 or more qualifying children, is your earned income less than $47,747 ($53,267 if married filing jointly)?
  • 2 qualifying children, is your earned income less than $44,454 ($49,974 if married filing jointly)?
  • 1 qualifying child, is your earned income less than $39,131 ($44,651 if married filing jointly)?
  • No qualifying children, is your earned income less than $14,820 ($20,330 if married filing jointly)?

3 or more qualifying children, is your earned income less than $47,747 ($53,267 if married filing jointly)? 2 qualifying children, is your earned income less than $44,454 ($49,974 if married filing jointly)? 1 qualifying child, is your earned income less than $39,131 ($44,651 if married filing jointly)? No qualifying children, is your earned income less than $14,820 ($20,330 if married filing jointly)?

 [ ]
Yes.

Go to Step 6.

 [ ]
No.

You can't take the credit.

Step 6. How To Figure the Credit

1. Do you want the IRS to figure the credit for you?

 [ ]
Yes.

See Credit figured by the IRS, later.

 [ ]
No.

Go to the Earned Income Credit Worksheet.

Definitions and Special Rules

Adopted child.   An adopted child is always treated as your own child. An adopted child includes a child lawfully placed with you for legal adoption.

Combat pay, nontaxable.   If you were a member of the U.S. Armed Forces who served in a combat zone, certain pay is excluded from your income. See Combat Zone Exclusion in Pub. 3. You can elect to include this pay in your earned income when figuring the EIC. The amount of your nontaxable combat pay should be shown in box 12 of Form(s) W-2 with code Q. If you are filing a joint return and both you and your spouse received nontaxable combat pay, you can each make your own election. In other words, if one of you makes the election, the other one can also make it but doesn't have to.

Credit figured by the IRS.   To have the IRS figure your EIC:
  1. Enter “EIC” to the left of the entry space for Form 1040A, line 42a.

  2. Be sure you enter the nontaxable combat pay you elect to include in earned income on Form 1040A, line 42b. See Combat Pay, nontaxable, earlier.

  3. If you have a qualifying child, complete and attach Schedule EIC. If your EIC for a year after 1996 was reduced or disallowed, see Form 8862, who must file, later.

Exception to time lived with you.   Temporary absences by you or the child for special circumstances, such as school, vacation, business, medical care, military service, or detention in a juvenile facility, count as time the child lived with you. Also see Kidnapped child in the instructions for line 6c and Members of the military, later. A child is considered to have lived with you for more than half of 2015 if the child was born or died in 2015 and your home was this child's home for more than half the time he or she was alive in 2015.

Form 8862, who must file.   You must file Form 8862 if your EIC for a year after 1996 was reduced or disallowed for any reason other than a math or clerical error. But don't file Form 8862 if either of the following applies.
  • You filed Form 8862 for another year, the EIC was allowed for that year, and your EIC hasn't been reduced or disallowed again for any reason other than a math or clerical error.

  • You are taking the EIC without a qualifying child and the only reason your EIC was reduced or disallowed in the other year was because it was determined that a child listed on Schedule EIC wasn't your qualifying child.

  Also, don't file Form 8862 or take the credit for the:
  • 2 years after the most recent tax year for which there was a final determination that your EIC claim was due to reckless or intentional disregard of the EIC rules, or

  • 10 years after the most recent tax year for which there was a final determination that your EIC claim was due to fraud.

Foster child.   A foster child is any child placed with you by an authorized placement agency or by judgment, decree, or other order of any court of competent jurisdiction. For more details on authorized placement agencies, see Pub. 596.

Married child.   A child who was married at the end of 2015 is a qualifying child only if (a) you can claim him or her as your dependent on Form 1040A, line 6c, or (b) you could have claimed him or her as your dependent except for the special rule under Children of divorced or separated parents in the instructions for line 6c.

Members of the military.   If you were on extended active duty outside the United States, your main home is considered to be in the United States during that duty period. Extended active duty is military duty ordered for an indefinite period or for a period of more than 90 days. Once you begin serving extended active duty, you are considered to be on extended active duty even if you don't serve more than 90 days.

Nonresident aliens.   If your filing status is married filing jointly, go to Step 2. Otherwise, stop; you can't take the EIC. Enter “No” to the left of the entry space for line 42a.

Permanently and totally disabled.   A person is permanently and totally disabled if, at any time in 2015, the person couldn't engage in any substantial gainful activity because of a physical or mental condition and a doctor has determined that this condition (a) has lasted or can be expected to last continuously for at least a year, or (b) can be expected to lead to death.

Qualifying child of more than one person.   Even if a child meets the conditions to be the qualifying child of more than one person, only one person can claim the child as a qualifying child for all of the following tax benefits, unless the special rule for Children of divorced or separated parents in the instructions for line 6c applies.
  1. Dependency exemption (line 6c).

  2. Child tax credits (lines 35 and 43).

  3. Head of household filing status (line 4).

  4. Credit for child and dependent care expenses (line 31).

  5. Exclusion for dependent care benefits (Form 2441, Part III).

  6. Earned income credit (lines 42a and 42b).

No other person can take any of the six tax benefits just listed unless he or she has a different qualifying child. If you and any other person can claim the child as a qualifying child, the following rules apply.
  • If only one of the persons is the child's parent, the child is treated as the qualifying child of the parent.

  • If the parents don't file a joint return together but both parents claim the child as a qualifying child, the IRS will treat the child as the qualifying child of the parent with whom the child lived for the longer period of time in 2015. If the child lived with each parent for the same amount of time, the IRS will treat the child as the qualifying child of the parent who had the higher adjusted gross income (AGI) for 2015.

  • If no parent can claim the child as a qualifying child, the child is treated as the qualifying child of the person who had the highest AGI for 2015.

  • If a parent can claim the child as a qualifying child but no parent does so claim the child, the child is treated as the qualifying child of the person who had the highest AGI for 2015, but only if that person's AGI is higher than the highest AGI of any parent of the child who can claim the child.

Example.

Your daughter meets the conditions to be a qualifying child for both you and your mother. Your daughter doesn't meet the conditions to be the qualifying child of any other person, including her other parent. Under the rules just described, you can claim your daughter as a qualifying child for all of the six tax benefits previously listed for which you otherwise qualify. Your mother can't claim any of those six tax benefits unless she has a different qualifying child. However, if your mother's AGI is higher than yours and you don't claim your daughter as a qualifying child, your daughter is the qualifying child of your mother.

  For more details and examples, see Pub. 596.

  If you won't be taking the EIC with a qualifying child, enter “No” to the left of the entry space for line 42a. Otherwise, go to Step 3, question 1.

Social security number (SSN).   For the EIC, a valid SSN is a number issued by the Social Security Administration unless “Not Valid for Employment” is printed on the social security card and the number was issued solely to allow the recipient of the SSN to apply for or receive a federally funded benefit. However, if “Valid for Work Only With DHS Authorization” is printed on your social security card, your SSN is valid for EIC purposes only as long as the DHS authorization is still valid.

  To find out how to get an SSN, see Social Security Number (SSN), near the beginning of these instructions. If you won't have an SSN by the date your return is due, see What If You Can't File on Time.

  If you didn't have an SSN by the due date of your 2015 return (including extensions), you can't claim the EIC on either your original or an amended 2015 return, even if you later get an SSN. Also, if a child didn't have an SSN by the due date of your return (including extensions), you can't count that child as a qualifying child in figuring the EIC on either your original or an amended 2015 return, even if that child later gets an SSN.

Student.   A student is a child who during any part of 5 calendar months of 2015 was enrolled as a full-time student at a school, or took a full-time, on-farm training course given by a school or a state, county, or local government agency. A school includes a technical, trade, or mechanical school. It doesn't include an on-the-job training course, correspondence school, or school offering courses only through the Internet.

  

Welfare benefits, effect of credit on.   Any refund you receive as a result of taking the EIC can't be counted as income when determining if you or anyone else is eligible for benefits or assistance, or how much you or anyone else can receive, under any federal program or under any state or local program financed in whole or in part with federal funds. These programs include Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (food stamps). In addition, when determining eligibility, the refund can't be counted as a resource for at least 12 months after you receive it. Check with your local benefit coordinator to find out if your refund will affect your benefits.

2015 Earned Income Credit Worksheet—Lines 42a and 42b
Please click here for the text description of the image.

Earned Income Credit (EIC) Worksheet - Lines 42a and 42b

EIC Table

2015 Earned Income Credit (EIC) Table 
Caution. This is not a tax table.

Earned Income Credit (EIC) Table

1. To find your credit, read down the “At least - But less than” columns and find the line that includes the amount you were told to look up from your EIC Worksheet. 2. Then, go to the column that includes your filing status and the number of qualifying children you have. Enter the credit from that column on your EIC Worksheet. Example. If your filing status is single, you have one qualifying child, and the amount you are looking up from your EIC Worksheet is $2,455, you would enter $842.
  And your filing status is–
If the amount you are looking up from the worksheet is– Single, head of household, or qualifying widow(er) and the number of children you have is– Married filing jointly and the number of children you have is–
  0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3
At least But less than Your credit is– Your credit is–
$1 $50 $2 $9 $10 $11 $2 $9 $10 $11
50 100 6 26 30 34 6 26 30 34
100 150 10 43 50 56 10 43 50 56
150 200 13 60 70 79 13 60 70 79
200 250 17 77 90 101 17 77 90 101
250 300 21 94 110 124 21 94 110 124
300 350 25 111 130 146 25 111 130 146
350 400 29 128 150 169 29 128 150 169
400 450 33 145 170 191 33 145 170 191
450 500 36 162 190 214 36 162 190 214
500 550 40 179 210 236 40 179 210 236
550 600 44 196 230 259 44 196 230 259
600 650 48 213 250 281 48 213 250 281
650 700 52 230 270 304 52 230 270 304
700 750 55 247 290 326 55 247 290 326
750 800 59 264 310 349 59 264 310 349
800 850 63 281 330 371 63 281 330 371
850 900 67 298 350 394 67 298 350 394
900 950 71 315 370 416 71 315 370 416
950 1,000 75 332 390 439 75 332 390 439
1,000 1,050 78 349 410 461 78 349 410 461
1,050 1,100 82 366 430 484 82 366 430 484
1,100 1,150 86 383 450 506 86 383 450 506
1,150 1,200 90 400 470 529 90 400 470 529
1,200 1,250 94 417 490 551 94 417 490 551
1,250 1,300 98 434 510 574 98 434 510 574
1,300 1,350 101 451 530 596 101 451 530 596
1,350 1,400 105 468 550 619 105 468 550 619
1,400 1,450 109 485 570 641 109 485 570 641
1,450 1,500 113 502 590 664 113 502 590 664
1,500 1,550 117 519 610 686 117 519 610 686
1,550 1,600 120 536 630 709 120 536 630 709
1,600 1,650 124 553 650 731 124 553 650 731
1,650 1,700 128 570 670 754 128 570 670 754
1,700 1,750 132 587 690 776 132 587 690 776
1,750 1,800 136 604 710 799 136 604 710 799
1,800 1,850 140 621 730 821 140 621 730 821
1,850 1,900 143 638 750 844 143 638 750 844
1,900 1,950 147 655 770 866 147 655 770 866
1,950 2,000 151 672 790 889 151 672 790 889
2,000 2,050 155 689 810 911 155 689 810 911
2,050 2,100 159 706 830 934 159 706 830 934
2,100 2,150 163 723 850 956 163 723 850 956
2,150 2,200 166 740 870 979 166 740 870 979
2,200 2,250 170 757 890 1,001 170 757 890 1,001
2,250 2,300 174 774 910 1,024 174 774 910 1,024
2,300 2,350 178 791 930 1,046 178 791 930 1,046
2,350 2,400 182 808 950 1,069 182 808 950 1,069
2,400 2,450 186 825 970 1,091 186 825 970 1,091
2,450 2,500 189 842 990 1,114 189 842 990 1,114
2,500 2,550 193 859 1,010 1,136 193 859 1,010 1,136
2,550 2,600 197 876 1,030 1,159 197 876 1,030 1,159
2,600 2,650 201 893 1,050 1,181 201 893 1,050 1,181
2,650 2,700 205 910 1,070 1,204 205 910 1,070 1,204
2,700 2,750 208 927 1,090 1,226 208 927 1,090 1,226
2,750 2,800 212 944 1,110 1,249 212 944 1,110 1,249
2,800 2,850 216 961 1,130 1,271 216 961 1,130 1,271
2,850 2,900 220 978 1,150 1,294 220 978 1,150 1,294
2,900 2,950 224 995 1,170 1,316 224 995 1,170 1,316
2,950 3,000 228 1,012 1,190 1,339 228 1,012 1,190 1,339
3,000 3,050 231 1,029 1,210 1,361 231 1,029 1,210 1,361
3,050 3,100 235 1,046 1,230 1,384 235 1,046 1,230 1,384
3,100 3,150 239 1,063 1,250 1,406 239 1,063 1,250 1,406
3,150 3,200 243 1,080 1,270 1,429 243 1,080 1,270 1,429
3,200 3,250 247 1,097 1,290 1,451 247 1,097 1,290 1,451
3,250 3,300 251 1,114 1,310 1,474 251 1,114 1,310 1,474
3,300 3,350 254 1,131 1,330 1,496 254 1,131 1,330 1,496
3,350 3,400 258 1,148 1,350 1,519 258 1,148 1,350 1,519
3,400 3,450 262 1,165 1,370 1,541 262 1,165 1,370 1,541
3,450 3,500 266 1,182 1,390 1,564 266 1,182 1,390 1,564
3,500 3,550 270 1,199 1,410 1,586 270 1,199 1,410 1,586
3,550 3,600 273 1,216 1,430 1,609 273 1,216 1,430 1,609
3,600 3,650 277 1,233 1,450 1,631 277 1,233 1,450 1,631
3,650 3,700 281 1,250 1,470 1,654 281 1,250 1,470 1,654
3,700 3,750 285 1,267 1,490 1,676 285 1,267 1,490 1,676
3,750 3,800 289 1,284 1,510 1,699 289 1,284 1,510 1,699
3,800 3,850 293 1,301 1,530 1,721 293 1,301 1,530 1,721
3,850 3,900 296 1,318 1,550 1,744 296 1,318 1,550 1,744
3,900 3,950 300 1,335 1,570 1,766 300 1,335 1,570 1,766
3,950 4,000 304 1,352 1,590 1,789 304 1,352 1,590 1,789
4,000 4,050 308 1,369 1,610 1,811 308 1,369 1,610 1,811
4,050 4,100 312 1,386 1,630 1,834 312 1,386 1,630 1,834
4,100 4,150 316 1,403 1,650 1,856 316 1,403 1,650 1,856
4,150 4,200 319 1,420 1,670 1,879 319 1,420 1,670 1,879
4,200 4,250 323 1,437 1,690 1,901 323 1,437 1,690 1,901
4,250 4,300 327 1,454 1,710 1,924 327 1,454 1,710 1,924
4,300 4,350 331 1,471 1,730 1,946 331 1,471 1,730 1,946
4,350 4,400 335 1,488 1,750 1,969 335 1,488 1,750 1,969
4,400 4,450 339 1,505 1,770 1,991 339 1,505 1,770 1,991
4,450 4,500 342 1,522 1,790 2,014 342 1,522 1,790 2,014
4,500 4,550 346 1,539 1,810 2,036 346 1,539 1,810 2,036
4,550 4,600 350 1,556 1,830 2,059 350 1,556 1,830 2,059
4,600 4,650 354 1,573 1,850 2,081 354 1,573 1,850 2,081
4,650 4,700 358 1,590 1,870 2,104 358 1,590 1,870 2,104
4,700 4,750 361 1,607 1,890 2,126 361 1,607 1,890 2,126
4,750 4,800 365 1,624 1,910 2,149 365 1,624 1,910 2,149
4,800 4,850 369 1,641 1,930 2,171 369 1,641 1,930 2,171
4,850 4,900 373 1,658 1,950 2,194 373 1,658 1,950 2,194
4,900 4,950 377 1,675 1,970 2,216 377 1,675 1,970 2,216
4,950 5,000 381 1,692 1,990 2,239 381 1,692 1,990 2,239
5,000 5,050 384 1,709 2,010 2,261 384 1,709 2,010 2,261
5,050 5,100 388 1,726 2,030 2,284 388 1,726 2,030 2,284
5,100 5,150 392 1,743 2,050 2,306 392 1,743 2,050 2,306
5,150 5,200 396 1,760 2,070 2,329 396 1,760 2,070 2,329
5,200 5,250 400 1,777 2,090 2,351 400 1,777 2,090 2,351
5,250 5,300 404 1,794 2,110 2,374 404 1,794 2,110 2,374
5,300 5,350 407 1,811 2,130 2,396 407 1,811 2,130 2,396
5,350 5,400 411 1,828 2,150 2,419 411 1,828 2,150 2,419
5,400 5,450 415 1,845 2,170 2,441 415 1,845 2,170 2,441
5,450 5,500 419 1,862 2,190 2,464 419 1,862 2,190 2,464
5,500 5,550 423 1,879 2,210 2,486 423 1,879 2,210 2,486
5,550 5,600 426 1,896 2,230 2,509 426 1,896 2,230 2,509
5,600 5,650 430 1,913 2,250 2,531 430 1,913 2,250 2,531
5,650 5,700 434 1,930 2,270 2,554 434 1,930 2,270 2,554
5,700 5,750 438 1,947 2,290 2,576 438 1,947 2,290 2,576
5,750 5,800 442 1,964 2,310 2,599 442 1,964 2,310 2,599
5,800 5,850 446 1,981 2,330 2,621 446 1,981 2,330 2,621
5,850 5,900 449 1,998 2,350 2,644 449 1,998 2,350 2,644
5,900 5,950 453 2,015 2,370 2,666 453 2,015 2,370 2,666
5,950 6,000 457 2,032 2,390 2,689 457 2,032 2,390 2,689
6,000 6,050 461 2,049 2,410 2,711 461 2,049 2,410 2,711
6,050 6,100 465 2,066 2,430 2,734 465 2,066 2,430 2,734
6,100 6,150 469 2,083 2,450 2,756 469 2,083 2,450 2,756
6,150 6,200 472 2,100 2,470 2,779 472 2,100 2,470 2,779
6,200 6,250 476 2,117 2,490 2,801 476 2,117 2,490 2,801
6,250 6,300 480 2,134 2,510 2,824 480 2,134 2,510 2,824
6,300 6,350 484 2,151 2,530 2,846 484 2,151 2,530 2,846
6,350 6,400 488 2,168 2,550 2,869 488 2,168 2,550 2,869
6,400 6,450 492 2,185 2,570 2,891 492 2,185 2,570 2,891
6,450 6,500 495 2,202 2,590 2,914 495 2,202 2,590 2,914
6,500 6,550 499 2,219 2,610 2,936 499 2,219 2,610 2,936
6,550 6,600 503 2,236 2,630 2,959 503 2,236 2,630 2,959
6,600 6,650 503 2,253 2,650 2,981 503 2,253 2,650 2,981
6,650 6,700 503 2,270 2,670 3,004 503 2,270 2,670 3,004
6,700 6,750 503 2,287 2,690 3,026 503 2,287 2,690 3,026
6,750 6,800 503 2,304 2,710 3,049 503 2,304 2,710 3,049
6,800 6,850 503 2,321 2,730 3,071 503 2,321 2,730 3,071
6,850 6,900 503 2,338 2,750 3,094 503 2,338 2,750 3,094
6,900 6,950 503 2,355 2,770 3,116 503 2,355 2,770 3,116
6,950 7,000 503 2,372 2,790 3,139 503 2,372 2,790 3,139
7,000 7,050 503 2,389 2,810 3,161 503 2,389 2,810 3,161
7,050 7,100 503 2,406 2,830 3,184 503 2,406 2,830 3,184
7,100 7,150 503 2,423 2,850 3,206 503 2,423 2,850 3,206
7,150 7,200 503 2,440 2,870 3,229 503 2,440 2,870 3,229
7,200 7,250 503 2,457 2,890 3,251 503 2,457 2,890 3,251
7,250 7,300 503 2,474 2,910 3,274 503 2,474 2,910 3,274
7,300 7,350 503 2,491 2,930 3,296 503 2,491 2,930 3,296
7,350 7,400 503 2,508 2,950 3,319 503 2,508 2,950 3,319
7,400 7,450 503 2,525 2,970 3,341 503 2,525 2,970 3,341
7,450 7,500 503 2,542 2,990 3,364 503 2,542 2,990 3,364
7,500 7,550 503 2,559 3,010 3,386 503 2,559 3,010 3,386
7,550 7,600 503 2,576 3,030 3,409 503 2,576 3,030 3,409
7,600 7,650 503 2,593 3,050 3,431 503 2,593 3,050 3,431
7,650 7,700 503 2,610 3,070 3,454 503 2,610 3,070 3,454
7,700 7,750 503 2,627 3,090 3,476 503 2,627 3,090 3,476
7,750 7,800 503 2,644 3,110 3,499 503 2,644 3,110 3,499
7,800 7,850 503 2,661 3,130 3,521 503 2,661 3,130 3,521
7,850 7,900 503 2,678 3,150 3,544 503 2,678 3,150 3,544
7,900 7,950 503 2,695 3,170 3,566 503 2,695 3,170 3,566
7,950 8,000 503 2,712 3,190 3,589 503 2,712 3,190 3,589
8,000 8,050 503 2,729 3,210 3,611 503 2,729 3,210 3,611
8,050 8,100 503 2,746 3,230 3,634 503 2,746 3,230 3,634
8,100 8,150 503 2,763 3,250 3,656 503 2,763 3,250 3,656
8,150 8,200 503 2,780 3,270 3,679 503 2,780 3,270 3,679
8,200 8,250 503 2,797 3,290 3,701 503 2,797 3,290 3,701
8,250 8,300 501 2,814 3,310 3,724 503 2,814 3,310 3,724
8,300 8,350 497 2,831 3,330 3,746 503 2,831 3,330 3,746
8,350 8,400 493 2,848 3,350 3,769 503 2,848 3,350 3,769
8,400 8,450 489 2,865 3,370 3,791 503 2,865 3,370 3,791
8,450 8,500 485 2,882 3,390 3,814 503 2,882 3,390 3,814
8,500 8,550 482 2,899 3,410 3,836 503 2,899 3,410 3,836
8,550 8,600 478 2,916 3,430 3,859 503 2,916 3,430 3,859
8,600 8,650 474 2,933 3,450 3,881 503 2,933 3,450 3,881
8,650 8,700 470 2,950 3,470 3,904 503 2,950 3,470 3,904
8,700 8,750 466 2,967 3,490 3,926 503 2,967 3,490 3,926
8,750 8,800 462 2,984 3,510 3,949 503 2,984 3,510 3,949
8,800 8,850 459 3,001 3,530 3,971 503 3,001 3,530 3,971
8,850 8,900 455 3,018 3,550 3,994 503 3,018 3,550 3,994
8,900 8,950 451 3,035 3,570 4,016 503 3,035 3,570 4,016
8,950 9,000 447 3,052 3,590 4,039 503 3,052 3,590 4,039
9,000 9,050 443 3,069 3,610 4,061 503 3,069 3,610 4,061
9,050 9,100 439 3,086 3,630 4,084 503 3,086 3,630 4,084
9,100 9,150 436 3,103 3,650 4,106 503 3,103 3,650 4,106
9,150 9,200 432 3,120 3,670 4,129 503 3,120 3,670 4,129
9,200 9,250 428 3,137 3,690 4,151 503 3,137 3,690 4,151
9,250 9,300 424 3,154 3,710 4,174 503 3,154 3,710 4,174
9,300 9,350 420 3,171 3,730 4,196 503 3,171 3,730 4,196
9,350 9,400 417 3,188 3,750 4,219 503 3,188 3,750 4,219
9,400 9,450 413 3,205 3,770 4,241 503 3,205 3,770 4,241
9,450 9,500 409 3,222 3,790 4,264 503 3,222 3,790 4,264
9,500 9,550 405 3,239 3,810 4,286 503 3,239 3,810 4,286
9,550 9,600 401 3,256 3,830 4,309 503 3,256 3,830 4,309
9,600 9,650 397 3,273 3,850 4,331 503 3,273 3,850 4,331
9,650 9,700 394 3,290 3,870 4,354 503 3,290 3,870 4,354
9,700 9,750 390 3,307 3,890 4,376 503 3,307 3,890 4,376
9,750 9,800 386 3,324 3,910 4,399 503 3,324 3,910 4,399
9,800 9,850 382 3,341 3,930 4,421 503 3,341 3,930 4,421
9,850 9,900 378 3,359 3,950 4,444 503 3,359 3,950 4,444
9,900 9,950 374 3,359 3,970 4,466 503 3,359 3,970 4,466
9,950 10,000 371 3,359 3,990 4,489 503 3,359 3,990 4,489
10,000 10,050 367 3,359 4,010 4,511 503 3,359 4,010 4,511
10,050 10,100 363 3,359 4,030 4,534 503 3,359 4,030 4,534
10,100 10,150 359 3,359 4,050 4,556 503 3,359 4,050 4,556
10,150 10,200 355 3,359 4,070 4,579 503 3,359 4,070 4,579
10,200 10,250 352 3,359 4,090 4,601 503 3,359 4,090 4,601
10,250 10,300 348 3,359 4,110 4,624 503 3,359 4,110 4,624
10,300 10,350 344 3,359 4,130 4,646 503 3,359 4,130 4,646
10,350 10,400 340 3,359 4,150 4,669 503 3,359 4,150 4,669
10,400 10,450 336 3,359 4,170 4,691 503 3,359 4,170 4,691
10,450 10,500 332 3,359 4,190 4,714 503 3,359 4,190 4,714
10,500 10,550 329 3,359 4,210 4,736 503 3,359 4,210 4,736
10,550 10,600 325 3,359 4,230 4,759 503 3,359 4,230 4,759
10,600 10,650 321 3,359 4,250 4,781 503 3,359 4,250 4,781
10,650 10,700 317 3,359 4,270 4,804 503 3,359 4,270 4,804
10,700 10,750 313 3,359 4,290 4,826 503 3,359 4,290 4,826
10,750 10,800 309 3,359 4,310 4,849 503 3,359 4,310 4,849
10,800 10,850 306 3,359 4,330 4,871 503 3,359 4,330 4,871
10,850 10,900 302 3,359 4,350 4,894 503 3,359 4,350 4,894
10,900 10,950 298 3,359 4,370 4,916 503 3,359 4,370 4,916
10,950 11,000 294 3,359 4,390 4,939 503 3,359 4,390 4,939
11,000 11,050 290 3,359 4,410 4,961 503 3,359 4,410 4,961
11,050 11,100 286 3,359 4,430 4,984 503 3,359 4,430 4,984
11,100 11,150 283 3,359 4,450 5,006 503 3,359 4,450 5,006
11,150 11,200 279 3,359 4,470 5,029 503 3,359 4,470 5,029
11,200 11,250 275 3,359 4,490 5,051 503 3,359 4,490 5,051
11,250 11,300 271 3,359 4,510 5,074 503 3,359 4,510 5,074
11,300 11,350 267 3,359 4,530 5,096 503 3,359 4,530 5,096
11,350 11,400 264 3,359 4,550 5,119 503 3,359 4,550 5,119
11,400 11,450 260 3,359 4,570 5,141 503 3,359 4,570 5,141
11,450 11,500 256 3,359 4,590 5,164 503 3,359 4,590 5,164
11,500 11,550 252 3,359 4,610 5,186 503 3,359 4,610 5,186
11,550 11,600 248 3,359 4,630 5,209 503 3,359 4,630 5,209
11,600 11,650 244 3,359 4,650 5,231 503 3,359 4,650 5,231
11,650 11,700 241 3,359 4,670 5,254 503 3,359 4,670 5,254
11,700 11,750 237 3,359 4,690 5,276 503 3,359 4,690 5,276
11,750 11,800 233 3,359 4,710 5,299 503 3,359 4,710 5,299
11,800 11,850 229 3,359 4,730 5,321 503 3,359 4,730 5,321
11,850 11,900 225 3,359 4,750 5,344 503 3,359 4,750 5,344
11,900 11,950 221 3,359 4,770 5,366 503 3,359 4,770 5,366
11,950 12,000 218 3,359 4,790 5,389 503 3,359 4,790 5,389
12,000 12,050 214 3,359 4,810 5,411 503 3,359 4,810 5,411
12,050 12,100 210 3,359 4,830 5,434 503 3,359 4,830 5,434
12,100 12,150 206 3,359 4,850 5,456 503 3,359 4,850 5,456
12,150 12,200 202 3,359 4,870 5,479 503 3,359 4,870 5,479
12,200 12,250 199 3,359 4,890 5,501 503 3,359 4,890 5,501
12,250 12,300 195 3,359 4,910 5,524 503 3,359 4,910 5,524
12,300 12,350 191 3,359 4,930 5,546 503 3,359 4,930 5,546
12,350 12,400 187 3,359 4,950 5,569 503 3,359 4,950 5,569
12,400 12,450 183 3,359 4,970 5,591 503 3,359 4,970 5,591
12,450 12,500 179 3,359 4,990 5,614 503 3,359 4,990 5,614
12,500 12,550 176 3,359 5,010 5,636 503 3,359 5,010 5,636
12,550 12,600 172 3,359 5,030 5,659 503 3,359 5,030 5,659
12,600 12,650 168 3,359 5,050 5,681 503 3,359 5,050 5,681
12,650 12,700 164 3,359 5,070 5,704 503 3,359 5,070 5,704
12,700 12,750 160 3,359 5,090 5,726 503 3,359 5,090 5,726
12,750 12,800 156 3,359 5,110 5,749 503 3,359 5,110 5,749
12,800 12,850 153 3,359 5,130 5,771 503 3,359 5,130 5,771
12,850 12,900 149 3,359 5,150 5,794 503 3,359 5,150 5,794
12,900 12,950 145 3,359 5,170 5,816 503 3,359 5,170 5,816
12,950 13,000 141 3,359 5,190 5,839 503 3,359 5,190 5,839
13,000 13,050 137 3,359 5,210 5,861 503 3,359 5,210 5,861
13,050 13,100 133 3,359 5,230 5,884 503 3,359 5,230 5,884
13,100 13,150 130 3,359 5,250 5,906 503 3,359 5,250 5,906
13,150 13,200 126 3,359 5,270 5,929 503 3,359 5,270 5,929
13,200 13,250 122 3,359 5,290 5,951 503 3,359 5,290 5,951
13,250 13,300 118 3,359 5,310 5,974 503 3,359 5,310 5,974
13,300 13,350 114 3,359 5,330 5,996 503 3,359 5,330 5,996
13,350 13,400 111 3,359 5,350 6,019 503 3,359 5,350 6,019
13,400 13,450 107 3,359 5,370 6,041 503 3,359 5,370 6,041
13,450 13,500 103 3,359 5,390 6,064 503 3,359 5,390 6,064
13,500 13,550 99 3,359 5,410 6,086 503 3,359 5,410 6,086
13,550 13,600 95 3,359 5,430 6,109 503 3,359 5,430 6,109
13,600 13,650 91 3,359 5,450 6,131 503 3,359 5,450 6,131
13,650 13,700 88 3,359 5,470 6,154 503 3,359 5,470 6,154
13,700 13,750 84 3,359 5,490 6,176 503 3,359 5,490 6,176
13,750 13,800 80 3,359 5,510 6,199 501 3,359 5,510 6,199
13,800 13,850 76 3,359 5,530 6,221 498 3,359 5,530 6,221
13,850