Economic Impact Payment Information Center: Receiving My Payment

A1. The CARES Act limits offsets of Economic Impact Payments to past-due child support. No other federal or state debts that normally offset your tax refunds will reduce the payment. Nevertheless, tax refunds paid under the Internal Revenue Code, including the Economic Impact Payment, are not protected from garnishment by creditors once the proceeds are deposited into an individual’s bank account.

A2. The Payment may be offset for past-due child support.

Individuals whose portion of the payment was offset to pay their spouse’s past-due child support will automatically be sent their portion of the payment and do not need to take any action.

  • If you submitted Form 8379, Injured Spouse Allocation, with your 2019 federal income tax return, or in some cases, your 2018 return, the IRS will automatically mail a check in September. 
  • If you have not submitted a Form 8379, Injured Spouse Allocation, the IRS will automatically issue your portion of the payment (date to be determined). Do not file a Form 8379. This FAQ will be updated when we identify a payment date.

A3. If you received direct deposit of your refund based on your 2019 tax return (or 2018 tax return if you haven’t filed your 2019 tax return), the IRS has sent your Payment to the bank account provided on the most recent tax return. If you filed a Form 8888, Allocation of Refund, with your tax return to split your refund into multiple accounts, your Payment was deposited to the first bank account listed. You cannot change your account information.

If you filed your 2019 or 2018 tax return but did not receive your refund by direct deposit, your Payment will be mailed to the address we have on file even if you also receive Social Security, Railroad Retirement or Veterans Affairs benefits by direct deposit. This is generally the address on your most recent tax return or as updated through the United States Postal Service (USPS).

A4. If the account is closed or no longer active, the bank will return the deposit and you will be issued a check or, for a smaller group, a prepaid debit card that will be mailed to the address we have on file for you. This is generally the address on your most recent tax return or as updated through the United States Postal Service (USPS). You do not need to call the IRS to change your Payment method or update your address at this time.  If you receive a debit card and have any questions regarding how to use the card please go to EIPcard.com for more information.

As required by law and for security reasons, a letter about the Payment will be mailed to each recipient’s last known address within 15 days after the Payment is made. The letter will provide information on how the Payment was made  and how to report any failure to receive the Payment.

A5. No, the IRS will not send Payments to accounts used to make a payment to the IRS. If we do not have bank information for you, your Payment will be mailed to the address we have on file for you.

A6. You can find this information on one of your checks, through your online banking applications, or by contacting your financial institution directly. Make sure to enter the routing number, account number, and account type (checking or savings) correctly.

A7. We will mail your Payment to the address we have on file for you. This is generally the address on your most recent tax return or as updated through the United States Postal Service (USPS). Your payment will be made either by check or, in more limited situations, by a prepaid debit card.  If you receive a debit card and have any questions regarding how to use the card please go to EIPcard.com for more information.

A8. If you need to change your address, see Address Changes.

If the IRS receives your payment back because the Post Office was unable to deliver it, we will update your payment status to “Need More Information,” on the Get My Payment application at which point you will be able to enter your bank account information.

If you don’t provide your bank account information, the IRS will hold your Economic Impact Payment until we receive your updated address.

A9. Your bank account information is obtained from the most recently filed tax return or from our Get My Payment application if you provided the information through it.

If you haven’t filed a 2018 or 2019 tax return and you received SSA, RRB or VA benefits, your bank account information may be obtained from SSA or VA. You will receive your Payment as a direct deposit or by mail, just as you would normally receive your benefits. You will not be able to use Get My Payment to provide your bank account information.

A10. It is possible we do not have the correct bank account information for you, or your financial institution rejected the direct deposit. In either case, your Payment will be mailed to the address we have on file for you.

A11. Most individuals received only one Economic Impact Payment. However, some individuals are receiving a catch-up Economic Impact Payment.

If you believe you received more than one Economic Impact Payment (EIP) make sure that one is not:

  • Your tax year 2019 tax refund or an interest payment on a tax refund. Check the refund amount on your Form 1040 or 1040-SR for tax year 2019.
  • Your unemployment compensation payment. Some states are issuing back payments in a single check or direct deposit.
  • An EIP for someone else in your household. For example, you may have a family member who receives federal benefits or have an adult child who shares your name or bank account.
  • A catch-up Economic Impact Payment for a qualifying child or injured spouse.

Each Economic Impact Payment made will have a Notice 1444 mailed to the individual who has received the payment, the notice includes the recipient name and amount received.

If after checking the items above you believe you received a payment in error, return one of the payments using the instructions in the FAQs about returning an Economic Impact Payment.