Economic Impact Payment Information Center: EIP Eligibility and General Information

A1. U.S. citizens and U.S. resident aliens will receive the Economic Impact Payment of $1,200 or $2,400 if they filed married filing jointly and if they are not a dependent of another taxpayer and have a work eligible Social Security number with adjusted gross income up to:

  • $150,000 for married couples filing joint returns
  • $112,500 for head of household filers and
  • $75,000 for all other eligible individuals

Taxpayers will receive a 5% reduction in their payment for the amount their AGI is above these amounts.

Eligible retirees and recipients of Social Security retirement, survivor, or disability benefits (SSDI), Railroad Retirement benefits, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and VA Compensation and Pension (C&P), who do not file a tax return, will receive a $1,200 payment automatically.

These benefit recipients should refer to the Social Security, Railroad Retirement and Department of Veteran Affairs benefit recipients FAQs for additional information.

For eligible taxpayers who filed tax returns for 2019 or 2018, they receive the payments automatically.

For people who have little or no income and didn’t file a tax return or don’t receive any of the federal benefits listed above, they are also eligible for an Economic Impact Payment. They need to register with the Non-Filer tool on IRS.gov as soon as possible so they can receive a payment.

A2. Although some filers, such as high-income filers, will not qualify for an Economic Impact Payment, most will.

Taxpayers likely won't qualify for an Economic Impact Payment if any of the following apply:

  • You do not have any qualifying children and your adjusted gross income is greater than
    • $198,000 if your filing status was married filing jointly
    • $136,500 for head of household
    • $99,000 for all other eligible individuals
  • You can be claimed as a dependent on someone else’s return. For example, this would include a child, student who can be claimed on a parent’s return or a dependent parent who is claimed on their child’s return.
  • You do not have a Social Security number that is valid for employment.
  • You are a nonresident alien.
  • You filed Form 1040-NR or Form 1040NR-EZ, Form 1040-PR or Form 1040-SS for 2019.
  • An incarcerated individual.
  • A deceased individual.
  • An estate or trust.

A3.People who have no income or low-income and who aren't required to file a tax return may be eligible for an Economic Impact Payment and can easily register for a payment by using the free Non-Filers tool by October 15, available only on IRS.gov.

Check the IRS.gov tool - Do I Need to File a Tax Return? - to see if  you have a filing requirement or can benefit by filing a 2019 tax return. This includes those who file a tax return to get a refund even if though they are not required to file.

If you don’t have to file and do not plan to file a 2019 tax return, use the Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Here application to provide simple information by October 15 so you can get your payment.
 
Most Americans have received their Economic Impact Payment. This includes eligible taxpayers who filed a 2019 or 2018 tax return and those who usually do not have to file a tax return but receive Social Security, SSI, RRB or VA benefits. People in these categories who have not received their payment can use the Get My Payment to check on your payment status.

Some federal benefit recipients need to act by September 30. The IRS reopened the registration period only for individuals who are federal benefit recipients who didn't receive $500 per qualifying child payments earlier this year.

Those who received Social Security, SSI, RRB or VA benefits can use the IRS.gov Non-Filers tool through September 30 to provide information about a qualifying child to receive a $500 per child payment.
See the FAQs on this page and Non-Filers tool page for more information.

A4. For security reasons, the IRS plans to mail a letter about the economic impact payment to the taxpayer’s last known address within 15 days after the payment is paid. The letter will provide information on how the payment was made and how to report any failure to receive the payment. If a taxpayer is unsure they’re receiving a legitimate letter, the IRS urges taxpayers to visit IRS.gov first to protect against scam artists.

A5. The IRS urges taxpayers to be on the lookout for scam artists trying to use the economic impact payments as cover for schemes to steal personal information and money. The IRS doesn’t initiate contact with taxpayers by email, text messages or social media channels to request personal or financial information – even related to the economic impact payments. Also, watch out for emails with attachments or links claiming to have special information about economic impact payments or refunds.

A6. Use our guide to figure out which IRS tool you should  use to get your Economic Impact Payment. Certain federal benefit recipients will receive a catch-up $500 payment for qualifying children.

Those who received Social Security, SSI, RRB or VA benefits who did not file a 2019(or 2018) tax return or use the Non-Filers tool to provide information about a qualifying child to receive a $500 per child payment earlier this year, can use the IRS.gov Non-Filers tool. People who enter information on their qualifying child from August 15 through September 30 will receive a catch-up $500 payment per child.

See the FAQs on this page and the Non-Filers tool page for more information.

A7. Yes, U.S. citizens living outside the country are eligible for the Payment. Anyone eligible to file Form 1040 or Form 1040-SR is an eligible person if they have a valid SSN and can’t be claimed as a dependent of another taxpayer. Nonresident aliens who file or would file Form 1040-NR or Form 1040-NR-EZ are not eligible for the Payment.

A8. In many cases, the answer is yes. But special rules in the law apply to these five U.S. territories (possessions). In general, the tax authorities in each territory will make Payments to eligible residents. People in these territories with questions about the Payment should contact their local tax authority.

A9. Citizenship or residency status in the Freely Associated States, by itself, does not entitle you to a Payment.  However, if you are a resident of a U.S. territory for the tax year 2020 for U.S. territory income tax purposes, you can be eligible for a Payment from the U.S. territory tax agency.  To determine whether you are eligible for a Payment from a U.S. territory tax agency, consult with your U.S. territory tax agency.   Alternatively, if you are not a resident of a U.S. territory for the tax year 2020 but you are a U.S. citizen or U.S. resident for federal income tax purposes, you may be eligible for a Payment from the IRS.

A10. In general, eligible individuals should not receive a Payment from both the IRS and a U.S. territory tax agency.  If you have received a Payment from more than one jurisdiction and you are a resident of a U.S. territory for the 2020 tax year, please consult your U.S. territory tax agency concerning information about Payments received by U.S. territory residents from the IRS, including incorrect or duplicate Payments.  If you have received a Payment from more than one jurisdiction and you are a NOT a resident of a U.S. territory for the 2020 tax year, you should return any incorrect or duplicate Payments received from the U.S. territory tax agency to the IRS pursuant to the instructions about repayments.

A11. No. A Payment made to someone who died before receipt of the Payment should be returned to the IRS by following the instructions in the Q&A about repayments. Return the entire Payment unless the Payment was made to joint filers and one spouse had not died before receipt of the Payment, in which case, you only need to return the portion of the Payment made to the decedent. This amount will be $1,200 unless adjusted gross income exceeded $150,000. If you cannot deposit the payment because it was issued to both spouses and one spouse is deceased, return the check as described in Returning the Economic Impact Payment frequently asked questions. Once the IRS receives and processes your returned payment, an Economic Impact Payment will be reissued.

The Bureau of Fiscal Services has cancelled outstanding Economic Impact Payment (EIP) checks issued to recipients who may not be eligible, including those who may be deceased.  Recipients should still return these checks as described in Returning the Economic Impact Payment frequently asked questions.

A12. Upon enactment of the CARES Act, the IRS worked with unprecedented speed to issue Economic Impact Payments to individuals. The IRS initially implemented the legislation consistent with processes and requirements used with the 2008 stimulus payments, which resulted in EIPs being issued to certain deceased individuals. After further review, it was determined that those who died before receipt of the EIP should not receive the advance payment, also known as EIP. As a result of the review, IRS and the Bureau of Fiscal Services (BFS) took action to prevent future payments to deceased individuals. The cancellation of uncashed checks is part of this process.

BFS has cancelled outstanding Economic Impact Payment (EIP) checks issued to recipients who may not be eligible, including those who may be deceased. Treasury is encouraging financial institutions and other check cashing entities to determine the status of EIP checks by using Treasury check verification tools.

An EIP made to someone who died before receipt of the EIP should be returned to the IRS by following the instructions in the Economic Impact Payments FAQs on IRS.gov. Recipients should return these checks as described in Returning the Economic Impact Payment frequently asked questions.

Q13. A person who is a nonresident alien in 2020 is not eligible for the Payment. A person who is a qualifying resident alien with a valid SSN is eligible for the Payment only if he or she is a qualifying resident alien in 2020 and could not be claimed as a dependent of another taxpayer for 2020. Aliens who received a Payment but are not qualifying resident aliens for 2020 should return the Payment to the IRS by following the instructions about repayments.

A14. No. A Payment made to someone who is incarcerated should be returned to the IRS by following the instructions about repayments. A person is incarcerated if he or she is described in one or more of clauses (i) through (v) of Section 202(x)(1)(A) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. § 402(x)(1)(A)(i) through (v)). For a Payment made with respect to a joint return where only one spouse is incarcerated, you only need to return the portion of the Payment made on account of the incarcerated spouse. This amount will be $1,200 unless adjusted gross income exceeded $150,000.