Questions and Answers about the Second Economic Impact Payment

Below are frequently asked questions about the second Economic Impact (Stimulus) Payment, separated by topic. Please do not call the IRS.

You can check the status of your payment with Get My Payment. Visit our Get My Payment Frequently Asked Questions page to get answers to your questions about using the application.

Common Questions

Maybe. IRS updated Get My Payment (GMP) on January 5, 2021 to allow you to see if you’re receiving the second Economic Impact Payment.  If you checked GMP on or after January 5 and:

  • GMP reflects a direct deposit date and partial account information, then your payment is deposited there.
  • GMP reflects a date your payment was mailed; it may take up to three to four weeks for you to receive the payment. Watch your mail carefully for a check or an EIP debit card. The EIP debit cards arrive in a white envelope that prominently displays the U.S. Department of the Treasury seal. 
    (See the FAQ for EIP Card)

If you don’t recognize the bank account number displayed in the Get My Payment tool it does not mean your deposit was made to the wrong account that there is a fraud. If you do not recognize the account number, it may be an issue related to how information is displayed in the tool tied to temporary accounts used for refund loans/banking products. You do not need to complete Form 14039, Identity Theft Affidavit.

The IRS and tax industry partners are taking steps to redirect stimulus payments to the correct account for those affected. The IRS anticipates many additional taxpayers will receive payments following this effort.

If you’re eligible, and don't receive a payment – or if you don’t receive the full amount – you may be eligible to claim the Recovery Rebate Credit when you file your 2020 Form 1040 or 1040-SR tax return. See the IRS Statement — Update on Economic Impact Payments for more information.

If you haven’t yet received your direct deposit, you should continue to watch your bank accounts for a deposit in coming days. IRS tax industry partners are taking steps to redirect stimulus payments to the correct accounts as quickly as possible.

The information you see in the Get My Payment tool, including account numbers and potential deposit dates, may continue to display unfamiliar account numbers as the IRS continues to work through and update this issue.

If you don’t recognize the bank account number displayed in the Get My Payment tool it does not mean your deposits were made to the wrong account or that there is a fraud. If you do not recognize the account number, it may be an issue related to how information is displayed in the tool tied to temporary accounts used for refund loans/banking products. The IRS is working to address this. You do not need to complete Form 14039, Identity Theft Affidavit. 

The IRS and tax industry partners are taking steps to redirect stimulus payments to the correct account for those affected. The IRS anticipates many additional taxpayers will receive payments following this effort. You don’t need to take any action as this work continues; you do not need to call the IRS, your tax provider or your financial institution.

If you’re eligible, and don't receive a payment – or if you don’t receive the full amount – you may be eligible to claim the Recovery Rebate Credit when you file your 2020 Form 1040 or 1040-SR tax return. To get your payment as quickly as possible, you should electronically file your federal tax return and choose direct deposit.

The IRS is working hard to deliver the second Economic Impact Payment as rapidly as possible, as required by law, while still preparing for the upcoming 2021 tax filing season. Due to the compressed timeline, the IRS is unable to reissue any payments. If your mailed payment is returned to the IRS by the Post Office as undeliverable, IRS is unable to reissue the check.

If Get My Payment (GMP) on IRS.gov shows your payment has been directly deposited to a bank account that you don’t recognize , there may be an issue related to how information is displayed in the tool tied to temporary accounts used for refund loans/banking products.  It does not mean your deposit was made to the wrong account and or that there is a fraud. You do not need to complete Form 14039, Identity Theft Affidavit. 

The IRS and tax industry partners are taking steps to redirect stimulus payments to the correct account for those affected. The IRS anticipates many additional taxpayers will receive payments following this effort. You don’t need to take any action as this work continues; you do not need to call the IRS, your tax provider or your financial institution.

If you’re eligible, and don't receive a payment – or if you don’t receive the full amount – you may be eligible to claim the Recovery Rebate Credit when you file your 2020 Form 1040 or 1040-SR tax return.

You should visit IRS.gov for the most current information on the second round of Economic Impact Payments rather than calling the IRS, your financial institutions or tax software providers. IRS phone assistors do not have additional information beyond what’s available on IRS.gov. Visit IRS Statements and Announcements on IRS.gov for current information about the Economic Impact Payments along with other IRS subjects.

For more information about Economic Impact Payments and the 2020 Recovery Rebate Credit, visit IRS.gov/eip. You can check the status of your payment at IRS.gov/getmypayment. For other COVID-19-related tax relief, visit IRS.gov/coronavirus. Visit IRS Statements and Announcements on IRS.gov for current information about the Economic Impact Payments along with other IRS subjects.

No, Economic Impact Payments can’t be counted as income when determining if you or anyone else is eligible for benefits or assistance, or how much you or anyone else can receive, under any federal program or under any state or local program financed in whole or in part with federal funds. These programs also can’t count Economic Impact Payments as a resource for purposes of determining eligibility for a period of 12 months from receipt.

 

General Information

Payments started during the last week of December with more payments occurring in early 2021.

Direct deposit payments were issued first to individuals with valid routing and account information on file at the IRS.

Mailed payments followed – payments sent as a paper check or an EIP debit card require more processing and mailing time.
You can check the status of your payment at IRS.gov/getmypayment.

If you checked Get My Payment and received a response indicating a direct deposit was to be sent to an account you do not recognize, the IRS advises you to continue to monitor your bank accounts for deposits. Some recipients may have had their payment directed to the temporary bank account established when their 2019 tax return was filed.

The IRS and tax industry partners are taking immediate steps to redirect stimulus payments to the correct account for those affected. The IRS anticipates many additional taxpayers will receive payments following this effort. You don’t need to take any action as this work continues; you do not need to call the IRS, your tax provider or your financial institution.

Yes, the IRS will issue a notice, or letter, about the second payment. We will provide an update on the timeline for delivery of the notices when one is available.

Please keep any IRS notices/letters you receive related to the Economic Impact Payments with your tax records.

Yes, you can check the status of your first and second Economic Impact Payments. The status includes the date of the payment and the method (direct deposit or mailed payment date). Mailed payments will require more processing and mailing time.

Note: Because payments are being issued based on information IRS already has on file, you will not be able to add new routing or account information, or request to receive your payment by EIP Card.

Yes, if you didn’t receive the full amounts of both Economic Impact Payments, you may be eligible to claim the Recovery Rebate Credit on your 2020 tax return.

The Instructions for Form 1040 or 1040-SR include a worksheet used to calculate the Recovery Rebate Credit. To claim the credit, you’ll need to know the amounts of your first and second Economic Impact Payments.

You should file your 2020 Form 1040 or 1040-SR electronically and choose direct deposit for the fastest and most accurate way to claim and receive your payments as the Recovery Rebate Credit. For information on how to find your payment amounts go to the Recovery Rebate Credit page on IRS.gov.
Requesting My Payment

Eligibility

Generally, if you’re a U.S. citizen or U.S. resident alien, you may be eligible for $600 ($1,200  for a joint return), plus $600 for each qualifying child, if you (and your spouse if filing a joint return) aren’t a dependent of another taxpayer on a 2019 tax return, have a social security number (SSN) valid for employment (see exception when married filing joint) and your adjusted gross income (AGI) does not exceed:

  • $150,000 if married and filing a joint return or if filing as a qualifying widow or widower;
  • $112,500 if filing as head of household; or
  • $75,000 for eligible individuals using any other filing status

Your payment will be reduced by 5% of the amount by which your AGI exceeds the applicable threshold above.

You aren’t eligible for a payment if any of the following apply to you:

  • You were claimed as a dependent on another taxpayer’s 2019 tax return (for example, a child or student who may be claimed on a parent’s tax return or a dependent parent who may be claimed on an adult child’s tax return).
  • You don’t have an SSN that is valid for employment issued before the due date of your 2019 tax return (including any extensions).
  • You’re a nonresident alien.
  • Someone was deceased before 2020.
  • Are an estate or trust.

However, you may be eligible to claim a Recovery Rebate Credit on line 30 of your 2020 tax return. Please refer to the instructions for the 2020 Form 1040 for more information.

A payment won’t be issued to someone who has died before January 1, 2020. If you filed a joint return in 2019 and your spouse died before January 1, 2020, you won’t receive a $600 payment for your deceased spouse, but you’ll still be issued up to $600 for you and $600 for any qualifying children, if all other eligibility criteria are met. 

Regarding eligible individuals who died in 2020, the Recovery Rebate Credit may be claimed on line 30 of their 2020 tax return.  Please refer to the instructions for the 2020 Form 1040 for more information.

Yes, individuals will not be denied Economic Impact Payments solely because they are incarcerated.  An incarcerated individual may be issued a payment if all eligibility requirements are met and the individual filed a 2019 tax return that was processed by the IRS. Eligible incarcerated individuals may claim a 2020 Recovery Rebate Credit on line 30 of their 2020 tax return.  Please refer to the instructions for the 2020 Form 1040 for more information.

A valid SSN for a payment is one that is valid for employment in the United States and is issued by the Social Security Administration (SSA) before the due date of your 2019 tax return (including the filing deadline postponement to July 15 and an extension to October 15 if you requested it).

If the individual was a U.S. citizen when they received the SSN, then it’s valid for employment. If “Not Valid for Employment” is printed on the individual’s Social Security card and the individual’s immigration status has changed so that they’re now a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, ask the SSA for a new Social Security card. However, if “Valid for Work Only With DHS Authorization” is printed on the individual's Social Security card, the individual has the required SSN only as long as the Department of Homeland Security authorization is valid.

No, if you file jointly with your spouse and only one individual has a valid SSN, the spouse with a valid SSN will receive up to a $600 payment and up to $600 for each qualifying child claimed on the 2019 tax return.

If neither has a valid SSN, no payment will be allowed even if their qualifying child has a valid SSN.

Active Military: If either spouse is an active member of the U.S. Armed Forces at any time during the taxable year, only one spouse needs to have a valid SSN for the couple to receive up to $1,200 for themselves.

If you file separately from your spouse, only the spouse who has an SSN may qualify for a payment.

A qualifying child must have either:

  • An SSN that’s valid for employment and assigned to them before the due date of your 2019 return (including the filing deadline postponement to July 15 and an extension to October 15 if you requested it); or
  • An ATIN.

An ITIN won’t be accepted for a qualifying child.

Note: When the qualifying child is claimed by spouses filing a joint return, at least one spouse must have an SSN that’s valid for employment for a qualifying child to be considered. If the return isn’t filed by married spouses filing a joint return, the taxpayer filing the return must have an SSN that’s valid for employment for a qualifying child to be considered.

A qualifying child is a child who meets the following conditions:

  • Relationship to the individual who’s eligible for the payment: The child is your son, daughter, stepchild, eligible foster child, brother, sister, stepbrother, stepsister, half-brother, half-sister, or a descendant of any of them (for example, grandchild, niece, or nephew).
  • Child's age: The child was under age 17 on December 31, 2019.
  • Dependent of the individual who's eligible for the payment: The child was claimed as your dependent on your 2019 tax return or in the Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Here tool.
  • Child's citizenship: The child’s a U.S. citizen, U.S. national, or U.S. resident alien.
  • Child's residency: The child lived with you for more than half of 2019.
  • Support for child: The child didn’t provide over half of their own support for 2019.
  • Child's tax return: The child doesn’t file a joint return for the year (or files it only to claim a refund of withheld income tax or estimated tax paid).

The payment will include $600 for each qualifying child listed on your 2019 tax return with a valid SSN or ATIN. 

In many cases, the answer is yes. But special rules in the law apply to these five U.S. territories. In general, the tax authorities in each U.S. territory will make payments to eligible residents. If you’re a resident of one of these U.S. territories with questions about a payment, you should contact your local tax authority.

Resident of a U.S territory: If you receive a payment from the IRS and a U.S. territory tax agency and you’re a resident of a U.S. territory for the 2020 tax year, please consult with your U.S. territory tax agency concerning information about an incorrect or duplicate payment.

Not a resident of a U.S. territory: If you’ve received a payment from more than one jurisdiction and you’re NOT a resident of a U.S. territory for the 2020 tax year, you should return any incorrect or duplicate payment received from the U.S. territory tax agency to the IRS following the instructions about repayments. See Topic I: Returning the Economic Impact Payment for instructions.

Citizenship or residency status in the Freely Associated States, by itself, doesn’t entitle you to a payment. However, if you’re a resident of a U.S. territory for the tax year 2020 for U.S. territory income tax purposes, you may be eligible for a payment from the U.S. territory tax agency. To determine whether you’re eligible for a payment, consult with your U.S. territory tax agency. Alternatively, if you’re not a resident of a U.S. territory for the tax year 2020 but you’re a U.S. citizen or U.S. resident for federal income tax purposes, you may be eligible for a payment from the IRS.

Resident of a U.S. territory: You shouldn’t receive a payment from both the IRS and a U.S. territory tax agency. If you received a payment from more than one jurisdiction and you’re a resident of a U.S. territory for the 2020 tax year, please consult with your U.S. territory tax agency concerning information about payments received, including any incorrect or duplicate payment.

Not a resident of a U.S. territory: If you’ve received a payment from more than one jurisdiction and you’re NOT a resident of a U.S. territory for the 2020 tax year, you should return any incorrect or duplicate payment received from the U.S. territory tax agency to the IRS following the instructions about repayments. See Topic I: Returning the Economic Impact Payment for instructions.

A person who’s a qualifying resident alien with an SSN valid for employment is eligible for the payment only if he or she is a qualifying resident alien in 2020 and may not be claimed as a dependent of another taxpayer.  A nonresident alien in 2020 isn’t eligible for the payment. An alien who received a payment but isn’t a qualifying resident alien for 2020 should return the payment to the IRS by following the instructions as described in Topic I: Returning the Economic Impact Payment for instructions.

Calculating The Payment 

Eligible individuals who filed a 2019 joint tax return will receive up to $1,200, and all other eligible individuals will receive up to $600. Those with qualifying children on their 2019 tax return will receive up to $600 in additional payment per qualifying child.

Eligible individuals don’t need a minimum income for the payment. However, for higher income individuals, the payment amount is reduced by 5% of the amount that their adjusted gross income exceeds the following thresholds:

  • $150,000 for taxpayers filing a joint return or filing a return as a qualifying widow or widower
  • $112,500 for taxpayers filing as head of household
  • $75,000 for all others

The $600 payment for eligible individuals with no qualifying children ($1,200 for married couples filing a joint return) will be reduced to $0 once adjusted gross income reaches the following amounts:

  • $174,000 for taxpayers filing a joint return
  • $124,500 for taxpayers filing as head of household
  • $87,000 for taxpayers filing as single or married filing separately

Each of these adjusted gross income amounts at which the payment is reduced to $0 increases by $12,000 for each additional qualifying child.

Note: Qualifying widows and widowers whose AGI is more than $75,000 may not have received the full amount of their payments.  Those individuals may claim the Recovery Rebate Credit on line 30 of their 2020 return. Please refer to the instructions for the 2020 Form 1040 for more information.

Requesting My Payment 

No action is necessary. Your payment will be issued based on the information the IRS has on file for your 2019 tax return, the information you provided on the – no-longer-available – IRS Non-Filers tool, payment information entered on the Get My Payment tool, or information provided by a federal agency that issued benefits to you (Social Security Administration, Veteran Affairs, or Railroad Retirement Board).

If you checked Get My Payment and received a response indicating a direct deposit was to be sent to an account you do not recognize, the IRS advises you to continue to monitor your bank accounts for deposits. Some recipients may have had their payment directed to the temporary bank account established when their 2019 tax return was filed.

The IRS and tax industry partners are taking immediate steps to redirect stimulus payments to the correct account for those affected. The IRS anticipates many additional taxpayers will receive payments following this effort. You don’t need to take any action as this work continues; you do not need to call the IRS, your tax provider or your financial institution.

If you don’t get a payment and you are eligible to receive one, you may be eligible to claim it on your 2020 tax return as the Recovery Rebate Credit.

No action is necessary for you to receive the second payment. Your payment will be issued based on information the IRS has on file for your 2019 tax return, the information you provided on the – no longer available – IRS Non-Filers tool, payment information entered on the Get My Payment tool, or information provided by a federal agency that issued benefits to you (Social Security Administration, Veterans Affairs, or Railroad Retirement Board).

If you don’t get a payment and you are eligible to receive one, you may be eligible to claim it on your 2020 tax return as the Recovery Rebate Credit.
 

No action is necessary for you to receive the second payment. Your payment will be issued based on information the IRS has on file for your 2019 tax return, the information you provided on the - no longer available - IRS Non-Filers tool, payment information entered on the Get My Payment tool, or information provided by a federal agency that issued benefits to you (Social Security Administration, Veterans Affairs, or Railroad Retirement Board).

If you don’t get a payment and you are eligible to receive one, you may be able to claim it on your 2020 tax return as the Recovery Rebate Credit.

No. The Non-Filers tool is no longer available.  If you don’t get a payment and you are eligible to receive one, you may be able to claim it on your 2020 tax return as the Recovery Rebate Credit.

 

Receiving My Payment

No, unless there is an exigent circumstance.  If you think the IRS inadvertently served a levy on an account into which your Economic Impact Payment was deposited, contact the IRS within 21 days at the phone number listed on the levy notice to let the IRS know that it has levied on your Economic Impact Payment.  

If the IRS doesn’t have routing and account information for you for a direct deposit, you will be sent either a check or debit card in the form of an EIP Card. If this applies to you, IRS urges people to carefully watch their mail for either of these during January. For more information see the IRS press release.

No. New EIP Cards will be issued. The earlier EIP Cards will not be “reloaded.” If you received an EIP Card for the first Economic Impact Payment, it does not mean you will receive an EIP Card for second payment; you may receive a check. If you received a check for the first payment, you may receive an EIP Card for the second payment. If this applies to you, IRS urges people to carefully watch their mail for either of these during January. For more information see the IRS press release.

EIP Cards are sponsored by the Treasury Department’s Bureau of the Fiscal Service, managed by Money Network Financial, LLC and issued by Treasury’s financial agent, MetaBank®, N.A.

The EIP Card will be sent in a white envelope from “Economic Impact Payment Card,” and will display the U.S. Department of the Treasury Seal.  The card has the Visa name on the front and the issuing bank, MetaBank®, N.A., on the back. Information included with the EIP Card will explain that this is your Economic Impact Payment.  If you receive an EIP Card, visit EIPcard.com for more information.