2021 Child Tax Credit and Advance Child Tax Credit Payments — Topic N: Commonly Asked Immigration-Related Questions

A1. Yes. You — and your spouse, if married filing a joint return — must have a Social Security number (SSN) or an IRS Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) to be eligible for the Child Tax Credit. You will receive advance Child Tax Credit payments only if you used your correct SSN or ITIN when you filed a 2020 tax return or 2019 tax return (including when you entered information into the Non-Filer tool on IRS.gov in 2020 or the Child Tax Credit Non-filer Sign-up Tool on IRS.gov in 2021).

Advance Child Tax Credit payments will be made for each qualifying child who has an SSN that is valid for employment in the United States.

A2. Yes. For your child to qualify you for the Child Tax Credit, your child must have a Social Security Number (SSN) that is valid for employment.

Therefore, if your child does not have an SSN that is valid for employment, you are not eligible to receive advance Child Tax Credit payments for that child.

A3. For qualifying children, a valid Social Security Number (SSN) is one that is valid for employment in the United States and is issued by the Social Security Administration (SSA) before the due date of your 2021 tax return (including extensions).

If an individual was a U.S. citizen when he or she received the SSN, then it is valid for employment in the United States. If "Not Valid for Employment" is printed on the individual's Social Security card and the individual's immigration status has changed so that he or she is now a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, ask the SSA for a new Social Security card.

However, if "Valid for Work Only With DHS Authorization" is printed on the individual's Social Security card, the individual has the required SSN only as long as the Department of Homeland Security authorization is valid.

A4. No. Under current law, receiving the Child Tax Credit or other Federal tax credits that you are eligible for will not affect your immigration status, your ability to get a green card, or your future eligibility for immigration benefits. Use of Federal tax credits is not considered for purposes of a "public charge" determination by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

A5. No. Having DACA does not affect your eligibility. If you and your child satisfy all eligibility requirements, you can claim your child for the 2021 Child Tax Credit and receive advance Child Tax Credit payments.

A6. Yes. Your eligibility is not affected by your child being a DACA recipient. If your child has a Social Security Number (SSN) that is valid for employment, and you and your child satisfy all other eligibility requirements, you are eligible for the Child Tax Credit and advance Child Tax Credit payments.